Beaver downed timber

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by moonwolf, Nov 11, 2004.

  1. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    You folks mainly having woodlots or tracts in the northwoods around beaver ponds might relate to this.

    Across a pond over the past years, the Beavers have downed some fairly large poplar trees. Now these are striped of the big brances and some of it can be cut up and used for firewood. I'm thinking next season to try retreiving some to burn for wood fuel in the outdoor furnace.
    Question I have is that some of this is laying about 8 years. It's dry. Once cut and stacked next year (I can't do it this year), but it's tractor fuel going back and forth once the it's frozen over. I usually could haul a 1/2 cord load per trip.
    There may be several cords on the ground so far. It would just go to waste or be flooded if the beavers raise the pond water level anyway.
     
  2. electronrider

    electronrider Well-Known Member

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    well, poplar isnt the best wood for firewood, not too dense. But if it is free, just the cost of the fuel, then why not? Take a good look at the wood as yer loadin it up, obviously you want to make sure its not rotted, that would prolly be a waste of time then.

     

  3. Ole Man Legrand

    Ole Man Legrand Well-Known Member

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    Take a chain and drag the log home and then cut it up. saves a lot of labor of hauling.
     
  4. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    I've burned season poplar. It burns hot and fast. You would do well with it with your out door wood furnace. Alot of people around here burn it in those type furnaces.
    Although for the times when you don't want to or can't keep filling the furnace, its better to use a real dense hardwoood such as birch or black ash.
    I use both in my woodstove, mixing it in a 1-1 ratio in srping and fall and strictly birch in the colder parts of winter.
     
  5. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    been there, done that by skidding several trees at a time. Having a trailer hitched to the tractor seems to haul more and efficient and cleaner cutting it on site where it was downed.
    I would probably go there and cut up the downed timber in 3 ft. lengths, and stack it to bring out whenever I could go get it (at freeze up time).
    The outside furnace handles large pieces.

    Jackie, I've burned plenty of poplar. It does burn fast when dry, and I agree with you that it's better to mix with a denser wood. Also the fine ash builds up fast of burning a lot of poplar. Being outside, it's not a big deal to empty the ashes. It's just that it has to be done more often. Those ashes are good for the garden, so that part I don't mind so much. Before, if I've used poplar cut fresh, it was burned unseasoned with dry birch or ash. That combo was excellent.

    What concerned me most about considering this beaver mess, is the age of the poplar that is sitting on the ground. Regardless, if it burns and produces heat, then I guess it's worth bringing in if it's not rotted.
     
  6. insanity

    insanity Well-Known Member

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    Id venture to say if its 8years old its rotten.Rotten wood will not burn,it just smolders (like saw dust).Even oak doesn't last that long on the ground.But you might take your saw down and cut into a few pieces to see.You could also just wack it with an axe to see how hard it is,or isn't.I do this sometimes, to see how deep the rot is on hard woods.Sometimes large hard woods will be rotten on the out side few inches and hard as a rock in the middle (heart).But man it makes a mess cutting it up and knocking off the rot.Soft woods don't have the hard heart in the center so id image there a total loss.