Bean Talk

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by moonwolf, Nov 27, 2004.

  1. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    As I got some dry beans (french horticultural) out to soak for making chilli later, it got me to thinking about growing more dry beans. Besides easy storage when dry and good varieties for eating, I'm thinking what animals would utilized dry beans for good protein and meat conversion?

    What are some of your favorite dry beans to grow. Among some I have grown are black turtle, jacob's catttle, cowpeas (a dry pea) and a few others I can't remember off hand.
    What about letting the wax beans or string beans go to hard seed? Can those be utilized for eating or animal feed? Any thoughts or certain varieties that anyone would like to share that you have experience growing in your area?

    Rich
     
  2. Jimmy Mack

    Jimmy Mack Well-Known Member

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    the puple podded Royal Burgandy bush bean is a nice variety. the pods are purple making them easy to identify at harvest and then turn green when cooked. This variety also germinates in cooler weather (I'm in the Denver, CO area) and has outstanding flavor. Its a regular in my garden.

    I also like the texture of wax beans and in my experience they tend to be very prolific producers.

    no problem letting fully develop for a seed crop for most any beans

    in terms of fesh feed livestock feed you might consider a stock pea. I've got some Colorado Stock Peas going in the winter garden as a cover crop. haven't used them as feed but I bet they would produce more edible plant material for feed than beans

    good luck with the Rich!
     

  3. Mid Tn Mama

    Mid Tn Mama Well-Known Member Supporter

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    And of course the nitrogen fixing that they would give the soil would be wonderful in the garden. I planted a fall crop of pinto beans (1lb bag for $1 at the $ store). They didnt last long enough for a crop but they will nourish the soil and crowd out the weeds. I'll plant amongst the dead bean plants in the spring. In fact, if you want to know how lazy I am--I just threw my damaged, rotten tomatoes from another section of the garden amongst the bean plants and hope to have volunteers in that section next summer.
     
  4. Chas in Me

    Chas in Me Well-Known Member

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    I grew yellow eye baking beans. They look good, not eaten any yet. I also grew field peas and let them dry. We made soup from them. The ones left will get planted and plowed down. That was the worst soup we ever ate. LOL
     
  5. BeckyW

    BeckyW Well-Known Member

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    I tend to use a lot of the dried varieties at the shell stage. Just a matter of personal preference. Our favorite variety to use as a dried bean is southern black eyed peas. To my thinking, Vermont Bean Seed has the best selection of beans just about on the planet - bush, pole, shell, runners and dried! I was just drooling over their 2005 offerings over the weekend .....

    BW
     
  6. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    Becky, Thanks for that info. I found the link for Vermont Bean and I'll peruse the selections. Great!

    https://www.vermontbean.com/images/layout2_3x2.gif

    I'm still using canellini, jacob's cattle, vermont cranberry, and black turtle dried beans that were grown and stored from a few years ago. I've also grown yellow china, soldier, pinto, and white northern bean that I can remember. Others escape my memory, but I enjoy growing beans selected for the dry pick stage varieties. This company should add to a wider source and try some new choices.

    Rich