Bay Leaf Propagation/Storing

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Sonshe, Jan 3, 2007.

  1. Sonshe

    Sonshe Well-Known Member

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    I was just given a huge Bay Leaf branch. If I cut off two of the small side branches, skin off the outer bark on the lower part, put the exposed area in rooting compound, and plant it, do you think it will root and grow?

    Can I just freeze the rest of the leaves instead of drying them?
     
  2. suburbanite

    suburbanite Well-Known Member

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    I don't know about freezing the leaves, but bay trees love water, so make sure you keep the soil moist.

    It should have a good chance of rooting--it is quite common to see bay trees that have been uprooted by winds, continuing to grow years later from the horizontal log which has sprouted both leafy shoots and roots along its length.
     

  3. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    I doubt if you'd have any success doing that. If bay laurel were easy to propagate, everyone would have several plants. What is used for cuttings is the very end of the branches, the semi-hard portion where there are probably 5 or 6 leaves. Do not skin any bark, angle cut instead. The end 3 leaves are left on, stem dipped in rooting compound, then planted in a pot with 50/50 mix of sand and dirt. Whole works then covered with a clear plastic bag to assure never drying out. You may have roots as early as 3 months but more often 6 to 9 months before you know that there is growth. All contingent upon if they don't simply rot first. Best success I had was 3 out of 8.

    Martin
     
  4. suburbanite

    suburbanite Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Martin. I was just guessing based on what I'd seen with California Bay trees, which are a different species than the bay most commonly used for spice (though they taste identical, with the California variety being stronger).