Bartering

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by BearCreekFarm, Nov 25, 2005.

  1. BearCreekFarm

    BearCreekFarm Well-Known Member

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    DH and I have really gotten into bartering lately. We have done some bartering amongst friends and acquaintances in our area for a long time, but recently took it to a new level by using the internet. If I had 100 hens I could trade for every egg they could lay!

    This morning my neighbor came over to get eggs (we trade eggs for milk) and she was all excited and could hardly wait to tell me about her new barter arrangement. She has started helping a neighboring farmer with their milking and chores twice a week. It takes her 4 hours each afternoon, and in exchange she gets one Jersey bull calf for each shift. She and her husband just fenced in their pastures this year so that they can start raising grass-fed beef, so this is a very timely arrangement for them. The dairy is currently milking around 90 cows, so she could potentially wind up with 40-50 calves. Hmm, not sure what she will do when they run out of calves, lol. Well, I am excited for her and hope the arrangement works out well.
     
  2. auntieemu

    auntieemu Well-Known Member

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    When you say a calf for each shift, I thought you meant 2 calves.
     

  3. BearCreekFarm

    BearCreekFarm Well-Known Member

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    I think I meant one calf each 4-hour shift, or two calves per week.
     
  4. Shepherd

    Shepherd Well-Known Member

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    Gads, that's really generous of them!
     
  5. Marilyn in CO

    Marilyn in CO Well-Known Member

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    We barter feed with neighbors in exchange for use of machinery. :D
     
  6. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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    Not really. They don't want the bull calves because they can't milk them when they get older. They would be lucky to get $5 for a day old at the auction. One dairy I knew growing up would put them in a pin next to the road with a sign " free calves." Most didn't get adopted and died in the pin. Just saves them the trouble of getting rid of them.

    BCF - Does your Nieghbor understand what it takes to raise a calf? Where's she going to get all the milk (starter formula) to raise them?
     
  7. Siryet

    Siryet In Remembrance

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    Times have changed, Here, they sell the calves for $150 and up Bull Calves and if they are weaned they get $300.00
     
  8. BearCreekFarm

    BearCreekFarm Well-Known Member

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    Yes, Wolf, she does know very well what it takes to raise calves. She and her husband have a herd of dairy goats and a small herd (four) of dairy cows.

    Typically, bull calves in our area sell for $125-140. Jerseys, however, don't have the value that other dairy breeds do, but even they bring $40-50 apiece. So, that works out to about $10-12.50 an hour for my neighbor's labor. Not bad for these parts. She and her husband raise their own oats, corn, and hay, plus they have their pastures, so they won't have much cash in these guys by the time they butcher them.
     
  9. Caelma

    Caelma Well-Known Member

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    Just FYI
    I have been told if you
    swap work for living quarters
    and even merchandise for merchandise can you believe
    IRS considered it an income cause you are recieving something
    merchandise in exchange of cash, still an income per se, thus technically needs to be documented and claimed :rolleyes:

    PS: Best to keep matter private, about a year ago, a different forum I belong to, one of the responses in a post I was invloved with (nothing really of any major importance) was quoted later in a BBC new artical, so one never knows who is reading our stuff that is NOT a member of our forum since this is public.
    With so many of you using farm and business names as your forum ID
    I am not endorseing dishonesty in any way, I am however wanting to warn you of privacy issues when mentioning finances
     
  10. Shepherd

    Shepherd Well-Known Member

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    That's great the bartering your neighbor's done. They can raise the calves and butcher for the meat once they're fed out.
     
  11. BearCreekFarm

    BearCreekFarm Well-Known Member

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    ranchlady- there is nothing illegal or dishonest about using a barter system. I don't advocate that anyone do anything that is not aboveboard, and I don't assume that because someone uses a barter system they must be doing something wrong. And I don't do anything that I would have to keep a secret, so I have no qualms about posting this on a public forum.

    Bartering is a GREAT way to do business, that is why I posted this here, to maybe give someone else an idea that they might not have thought of which they might be able to use themselves. I WANT people to read this post. Bartering is the only reason I can even remotely justify keeping my laying flock. Nobody around here buys our eggs, many people have their own chickens, or their neighbor/friend/relative does so they get them free or dirt cheap. People put signs out all the time advertising eggs for anywhere from 50 cents to $1.25/dozen. Our hens are fed a transitional organic feed and at $2/dozen I don't think we are breaking even, much less profiting. But, I can take my eggs to the cities and barter for all kinds of stuff that is useful to me but might be junk, or at least useless to, people down there. Heck, we trade for some things that people might have to PAY to have hauled away as trash down there, lol. So it works out great, everyone winds up happy.

    I think there are loads of possibilities. Maybe someone will post some ideas that help us, too.
     
  12. Caelma

    Caelma Well-Known Member

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    no no no, that's not what I meant, I meant by my saying to be cautious mentioning hundreds and thousands of $$$$ in barter trades, just be careful how much private financial info one gives in a post. And due to my warning I was in no anyway saying be dishonest, was just warning caution on mentioning the hundred and thousands part.

    I personally think Bartering is great and for many of us it enables us to get and aquire things we ordinarily coulds not afford or would not pay cash for.

    I'm not tax person, don't claim to be, But I have been told by a ax person technically we are suppose to report bartering as an income and expense, which makes absolutely no sense what so ever to me if we are making equal trade, but you know our government, anything to make an extra buck.

    I was equally shocked living quarters in exchange for work is reportable income, you're suppose to ask and find out the fair rent value and report this as an income. :rolleyes: even though no cash is changing hands.

    Was not insinuating it was dishonest, was only saying did folks realize this was a type of activity that IRS considers reportable and taxable. And be careful mentioning amounts you bartered in public, if you want. Don't have to if you don't want to.
    With my customers I use to barter at Christmas for gifts in stores, they got my product for them to resale and I got Christmas on my efforts not my cash.
    When I was notified this was considered reportable income, I canned doing it with businesses, still trade out rabbits with others on occation.
    Sorry I gave the wrong idea.
     
  13. TxCloverAngel

    TxCloverAngel Happiness is Homemade

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    I am very interested in how / where to find bartering groups in my area. is there a web site? I'd like to learn more about it sure sounds GREAT! any hints? tips? for a total "Newbie"?what type of things are in high demand? or is it mostly labor related? oooh I wanna know more!

    thanks!!
     
  14. ihedrick

    ihedrick Can't stop thinkin'

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    Finding people who are open to bartering is as easy as asking. If I need something and I have something to offer of comparable value; I ask around. Sometimes I get weird looks, but other times someone will say they aren't interested in what I offered, bu they would like a something or other. Then I can figure out if I can work the trade.
    I'm about ready to offer one freezer hog to the owner of the car dealership where I bought my truck as payoff for the truck. Otherwise, I'll find a handyman to help with a list of projects I can't do alone around here.
    I'm sure there are some web sites too that can help ya find organized bartering groups. I belonged to one when I lived in Cali. My kids did too. They worked for the elderly in our area and in turn used their credits to get rides to the mall and such from the younger members of the group (of course I knew who the drivers were also). The seniors read books to the young ones and if able, they babysat occassionally or pet sat to earn their credits.
    Bartering is great, but as previously posted the value received is considered income in the eyes of the IRS. So keep that in mind and act accordingly to what your concious tells you.
     
  15. BearCreekFarm

    BearCreekFarm Well-Known Member

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    Dana-

    I don't know where in Texas you are, but go to craigslist.org and look on the right hand side of the page. There is a list of all the cities which have craigslist. If you are anywhere near one of them, click on the name of the city and it will take you to the page for that city. Somewhere in the middle of the page there is a category titled "barter". Go to that section and you can see the types of things people have to offer. But, don't limit yourself to what you see already listed- people will often trade for anything- you'd be amazed. I started posting ads in the Minneapolis area a couple of monthe ago. We are 3 hours north of the cities, but we go down once a month to sell our products, and before we go down I line up all our barters online, then we pick them up on the way home after the market. People who read those ads rock- oh, but first, I want to add that I got responses from people who wer even further away from the cities than we are, which amazed me. I actually got so many responses in a couple of days that I had to pull my ad after the second day two months in a row. Also, people emailed to say that they had nothing to trade, or did not need our products, but just wanted to tell us that they thought it was awesome that we were bartering farm products. Other people emailed to say that they did not have anything we needed (I had posted a list of about 20 items we would trade for), but that they had seen ads on freecycle or free market for the item we were looking for, just to help us out. Other people emailed offering to trade for things that were not on the list but which would be useful to us (like a wheelbarrow, and we actually did need one but I had not included it).

    So, that is a good place to start. In addition, when you have something to barter, just start asking people if they want to trade. It's a little weird at first, but don't take it personally if they say no- just ask the next person. Or, if you have bulletin boards in your community, instead of just a For Sale sign, post a for sale or trade sign and see what happens.

    Some areas have online barter boards- you can do a search for your area and see what you come up with.
     
  16. lewbest

    lewbest Well-Known Member

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    I own 3 yahoo groups devoted to buy/sell/trade; names are descriptive of acceptable items. beekeeping_exchange, homestead_small_farm_exchange and shop_tool_exchange. They're not real active but the more members the more likely they are to become active! Anyone interested please join!

    Lew Best in Waco, TX
     
  17. canfossi

    canfossi Well-Known Member

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    Ive done bartering with my neighbours lately, never use to. I usually give them some firewood for little jobs I need them to help me with. It seems to work out alright. Chris
     
  18. Cygnet

    Cygnet Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Major newspapers, for what it's worth, should categorically NOT be quoting people here without giving them notice they're being quoted and asking for permission. That's unethical and, depending on the AMOUNT they're quoting, and the countries involved, could be a copyright violation. Your words are copyrighted by US law for the US citizens as soon as they're in print. Fair use would be to, maybe, quote one or two sentences, cite the source, ethics would probably require notifying the source, and not use the quote if the source didn't want to be quoted. I HAVE some gardening tips quoted in a book and the writer, who was ethical, not only got my permission, she sent me a copy of the book.

    A journalist could NOT take an entire post & reprint it if it were a US company and a US citizen doing the posting. I don't know how foreign laws work. That would be a major violation of copyright law. It'd be like stealing an article out of a competing newspaper. No can do. Not allowed, not legal, and you could nail them for $$$. I actually KNOW a writer who caught a small-town newspaper reprinting a most of a post from his own website in their newspaper. He got paid nicely for the offense. The guy was making a living writing & his per word rate was much higher than that little newspaper was used to paying ...

    As far as barter goes -- stupid rule, but the IRS is generally stupid. On the other hand, as far as I know, GIFTS are not taxed. :D

    Leva
     
  19. Caelma

    Caelma Well-Known Member

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    You're right Cygent, ones words should not be quoted without permission.
    But they were (not mine, anothers) and it was the BBC, the Mod of that forum is quite a wise person, I imagine she handled it.

    I'm not trying to rain on anyones parade. Just be careful what you say, our words are being read my many we most likely would prefer not read them.

    Believe it or not I was even approched on through this forum just a few weeks ago about a TV documentary about families moving from the main stream to the wilderness and how my posts about moving to Alaska, well they were wanting to talk to us. We declined and forwarded the IM to Chuck.
    I want to move for privacy, political and many other reasons, being on TV kind of defeats the privacy thing don't you think?

    I simply wanted to give a friendly warning not to mention finances, let folks know in case they didn't, Bartering is an IRS reportable income activity, check with your tax person and just in general be careful. Not trying to rain on anyones parade, was done with a sincere heart.
     
  20. goatkid

    goatkid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think barter is great. I helped a friend on her goat dairy for my foundation breeding stock and continue to barter by helping her in exchange for stud service on a few goats I don't wish to breed to my Nubian bucks. I barter with a friend who is a massage therapist by swapping some goat milk and cheese for body work. In our state, bartering is considered "in kind labor" and doesn't count as income for persons needing assistance for things such as help with heating in the winter. I suppose if a person were bartering for lots of expensive things, that may be different, but the state is OK if one does it for things they need to get by.