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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I asked this in the poultry section, too..try to cover my bases.

We are working on fixing up one of our sheds and moving all of our small livestock/animals into that (everything but the horses). I thought I had read that poultry and pigs cannot be kept together...I can't find anything about it now, though. Is this true? We are looking at putting our chicken pen boardering the pig pen - would that be okay? They wouldn't actually be penned together - just neighbors. Or should we put the rabbit pens inbetween them?

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks! Just wanted to double check. They will be in different pens (so no chicken dinners for the hogs!), but I thought I had read they shouldn't be kept together for disease.
 

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What you may find, depending on your fencing, that the occasional chicken will go in to eat the hog food, and the hog will end up eating it. We have large blacks that occasionally will nibble on a squatting turkey hen's tail feathers - and will continue to do so until it squacks - they won't eat anything live, they always just nibble/taste. Other breeds will be a bit more aggressive. A friend of mine had Yorks that were eating his pullets -

in other words - your mileage will vary ;-)

Chickens are very helpful to scratch through pig waste though!

Andrea
www.arare-breed.net
www.faintinggoat.net
 

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We co-pasture our chickens, ducks, geese and pigs. If they are raised from a young age with chickens around the pigs don't seem to turn into chicken eaters. I also cull any pigs that are a problem like that although it hasn't been necessary in years. If the pigs got hungry enough they might start thinking about their pasture mates as dinner but that really shouldn't be an issue - one feeds them to grow them...

The reason we co-graze the animals is they eat a pasture better as a team, some eating things that others don't and chickens are the best organic fly and parasite management.

The one thing not to do is have chicks around big pigs. The pigs routinely eat mice, as do the chickens, and chicks get sucked in too easily. Same goes for lambs, during lambing separate the ewes from the pig herd. A week later they can all be together again. The bloody newly born lamb is just too interesting for a curious pig to resist the temptation to take a taste.

Cheers

-Walter
Sugar Mountain Farm
in the mountains of Vermont
http://SugarMtnFarm.com/blog/
http://HollyGraphicArt.com/
http://NoNAIS.org
 
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