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Good morning guys,this is my second post and reason for joining this fantastic group. As you can see in title it says Barndominim but I don't know if that is what my project should be called. So let me first give my plan or intent and little history. First I am a DIY'er,I have built my house that I live in now and my garage.It was a learning process VIA mistakes. I just about did it all,from elec to drywall to building my cabinets. Well that was 35yrs ago which I am now 66 and wanting to get myself setup for retirement. Which will be in East Tx by Toledo Bend area on a small lot( No deed restrictions,no HOA,no inspections). So I been tossing the ideal of building a wood frame house about 1000-1200 sq ft. then a shop for my play time. I am a one man show so all this be done mostly myself to help keep cost down. My other options is a metal bldg which is what I am leaning towards,which it built on slab. I do have a quote and its in my budget as a shell I guess call it. I will be finishing the inside myself just like any other house but nothing fancy,two bedrms and one bath to keep cost down and hope also keep taxes down and the back half of the building will be my shop space. I don't know if something like this is qualified to be called a Barndominium or not. So with my game plan kinda laid out here, I will be asking for info on what to do and not to do.Framing inside a metal bldg is new to me so this is area where I am uncomfortable.Any websites,or Youtubes,links or maybe link to other members post would be big help.This is just beginning guys,in planning stages right now getting land in couple weeks.
 

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First of these I saw was in the mid 60s. Was in a Texas based magazine. A farm house burned down and the family had a long pole barn. they went in and closed off enough sections to make a long hall way, bedrooms an kitchen. leaving the back open. As time went on, they enclosed more and more. I think when the mag came out they had several kitchens, multiple living and dining rooms, and lots of bed rooms.
Someone built a basic pole barn under the hill from me about 30 years ago, It was enclosed, one day I noticed windows, doors and a stovepipe. Guess someone converted it.
Someone I knew had a horse barn built in pole barn style. closed up the front half, divided the space with 8 foot walls to make bedrooms/bath. Rest of the space was open. Poles coming up out of the floor. A screen door opened to the livestock area on nice days. That is a real rustic living arrangement. A horse looking in the kitchen door.
Met a half brother, had a metal building put up and framed up the inside himself, Used the upper space above living space as storage, Never did finish it. Cabinets and most rooms had no doors, but he lived there until he divorced. ex wife got the place. don't know if it was ever finished.
Most I know of are living on one side and shop storage on the other, some are completely living space. Most are metal buildings, that can be designed to suit. Both size and configuration. Finished out or not. Just ck with a metal bldg manufacturer and find out the options. If I have to redo again, I'll probably go that route myself. The roll up doors are noisy on windy days though. Keep that in mind.
 
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I have two such barndominiums.

At home we have an all steel, Butler building where I have partitioned off a finished "man cave" with bar, kitchenette, restroom, and a general party / game room. Simply built new insulated stud walls inside the existing insulated metal building walls and finished everything out with drywall, etc. left the ceiling high and exposed, but super insulated the metal roof.

My hunting cabin is a pole barn 35 x 55 x 10' tall with a small unfinished garage bay on one end and the balance all framed out and finished into a two bedroom apartment with complete kitchen, restroom, dining / great room and mechanical room, everything super insulated. Did a simple electric thru wall heat and AC unit, plus a wood stove for supplemental heat. Walls are pine car siding and left the floor a nice finished concrete slab with some rugs. Also has a covered porch on the end to sit outdors in the shade.

A couple things I would do differently:
a. For bug and rodent control, I would extend the foundation wall a course or two of block or poured concrete above grade so the base of siding is not down so close to ground level.
b. Use both metal and foam closures to close off the ribs of metal siding at base to prevent mice and bug entry.
c. I would build the metal shell, then spray foam the entire thing. Spray foam really seals things up tight against air leaks and also seals up better for bugs.
 

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I live in East Texas, as well, the Athens/Canton area. I couldn’t find Toledo Bend on the map. Barndominiums and metal homes are very popular around here. I’m seeing more and more new construction. My brother built his 6400 square foot, three story home as a metal building, then built the house inside it.

About 12 years ago, we built an apartment (Barndominium) in our metal barn. We planned for it before we had the barn constructed, so had all the plumbing in the concrete foundation and my husband later framed and finished out the apartment. It’s about 1100 sq. ft., two bedroom, one bathroom, living area and kitchen. We also built an office space as a part of it, but it has a separate entrance into the barn.

One thing to think about is that the steel beam structure is wider than normal walls. So, you have to decide if you want to have thick walls, losing a little floor space, or if you want to drywall around the beams and have them stick out a little. We chose the thicker walls, using 2x6’s instead of 2x4’s for framing, but in each bedroom, we used that deep wall space by building built-in bookshelves.

As another poster mentioned, if I had it to do over again, I would also raise the level of the foundation so that it was several inches above the soil. So far, we haven’t had water seep in, but I’m always worried that it will. Plus, the metal sheets are rusted at the bottom just a little.

We had cellulose insulation blown into the walls and that has been really nice. Makes the place almost soundproof, which you kind of need if you’re going to have work, heavy equipment, or animals in the barn area. Plus, it really keeps the apartment cool in the summer and warm in the winter.

We mostly built it for guests, but have had various people live in it from time to time. Our son lived in it with his family for a year. Honestly, I would not mind living in it. We raise goats and it is so handy to be right there with them during kidding and milking season. I would just have to step out the door into the barn (we have a sliding glass door for that and another metal door on the opposite side of the apartment that leads directly outside) without having to put coats on or make the trek from the house. I do keep all my milking supplies in there, plus freezers, so the milk handling is easy.

The sheet metal roofs do seem to have a problem with leaking. My brother has had constant problems with a persistent leaky spot. We also have a spot that leaks and we haven’t been able to stop it. Thankfully, it is over the barn area and not the apartment. We did have a leaky panel over the apartment right after we built it, but the company that built the metal structure came out and replaced the panels and we haven’t had a problem since then. I go up in the storage area above the apartment to check from time to time just to make sure.
 

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If your roof is leaking, metal or otherwise you most likely have a workmanship problem, not a material problem.
A metal roof is every bit as weathertight as any other type and will outlast almost all other types.

Another comment on the barndominium ...... Seems a lot of folks like to do a loft with the living quarters upstairs to maximize use of space. I think this is a real bad idea, particularly if you are middle age or beyond. Who in the heck want's to climb stairs if they don't have to? And think about what fun it will be moving large furniture, appliances, etc. to the upper level. Keep your living quarters on the ground floor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Guys lots of good points which leads me to another question that MosaicsMLS had brought up. Does the metal roof condensate on rainy days or when humidity is real high? And some of the metal roofs I see has that vinyl insulation and some don't. Our living space will not go up to the metal roof but will come close,planning on having that batt insulation above the ceiling.So does the metal roof sweat any during humid times?
We did get a quote from Metal Bldg of Tx which is in our price range without anything added,so they do the shell I guess its called then I will be taking over due to my budget
 

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If your metal roof is not insulated, you stand a good chance of having condensation issues. I would recommend having some white vinyl faced fiberglass insulation installed with the roof system to prevent this, and / or spray foam the underside. The white vinyl faced blanket insulation will be cheaper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Talking with the metal bldg company this morning ask question about size what it would cost to go with a 30x70x12' bldg instead of 40x60x10' was told that be little cheaper. Then was also told that if panels are ran horizontal instead of vertical would also be cheaper. So why is it cheaper to run horizontal,is there any strength loss? For me the appearance would look better if vertical but if it means a savings then I'm all in. So any ideals why its cheaper horizontal vs vertical?
 

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It's cheaper to run panels horizontally, because somehow they have found a way to eliminate some of the structural framing by doing so.

I spent 40 years of my career selling and building metal buildings. Most everything that gets built around here in the midwest is major name brand stuff; Butler, American, Nucor, Star, Ceco, Varco Pruden, etc. Our stuff is typically heavier and on substantial foundations. In Texas you don't have snow loads and don't need much foundation depth due to no freeze. Also, the gas and oil industry in your area has sprouted a whole lot of localized small fabricators that build metal buildings of all types. Many have some very unique ways of making them quite simple and economical. Things that won't work in snow country will often work in the south.

Out of curiousity .... What is the name brand of metal building company you are talking to?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I did not know there were name brands,I'm clueless but the name of the place is Metal Bldgs of Texas. If possible maybe you could look at their website and see if its just junk or if one of the name brands that your familiar with.Thanks for taking time to respond to my questions.
 

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meuller ?
 
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I did not know there were name brands,I'm clueless but the name of the place is Metal Bldgs of Texas. If possible maybe you could look at their website and see if its just junk or if one of the name brands that your familiar with.Thanks for taking time to respond to my questions.
Looked up their website.
All of their stuff is very lightweight "tube steel" framed stuff, considerably different than what we typically work with up here. They are not really providing a "name brand building", more like putting the components and package together.

I'm guessing they either fabricate all of the structural framing in house, or have a close relationship with a fab shop that fabricates their structural, then they buy their panels and trim from another supplier, doors, windows and insulation somewhere else, and put the package together themselves. Probably a quite localized operation vs the name brands such as I've mentioned that supply buildings all over the continent.

Does not look like their stuff is suited for large wide span buildings, pretty much limited to smaller stuff, which is fine. Not suggesting the products won't work are are inferior, they just do things differently.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I think they are a localize company which we seen their signs on freeway heading to our potential retirement home. They say their bldgs are rated for 140mph wind which is kinda important here in Houston area. As whiterock suggested Muellar does advertises on TV and we are getting a quote over phone using their 3D drawing,but they leave out cost for shipping,bolts,etc whatever else is needed that I don't know about. But it is an estimate
 

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No, but I think they are local to this area. Around Ellis County. They have been in business for a while and I believe have a good reputation.
 
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Since Fishindude was in the business, he’d know more than me, for sure. I can only speak about what we’ve experienced with ours and I haven’t noticed any condensation problems with the roof. Ours is about 14 ft. at the lowest point, so really too high for me to see, but we don’t get drips of condensation. The apartment side of the barn is insulated on the sides and the roof. There is storage above the apartment. The barn side is not insulated. And, believe me, if it was getting condensation, it would be dripping. It is quite humid here and the single pane apartment windows drip with condensation. We have ridge vents in the highest part of the roof and those leak when it rains real hard or the wind blows a certain way. But that’s over the barn part and isn’t really an issue.

And speaking of snow loads, do not dismiss it as if it was not an issue in TX. It’s highly unusual, but East TX is capable of having large amounts of snowfall. In 1929 a big storm dumped 26 inches of snow on some areas around here. If it happened once, it can happen again and it only takes once to cave your metal roof in. Take the safer route and have your bldg. built to withstand at least that much. Your builder will argue that you don’t need it, but he’s not the one who will have to pay for fixing it if it does happen. Also, large hail can damage a metal roof. Right after my brother had his barndo built, we had a hailstorm. We only live 8 miles from him. We got quarter sized hail and he got 4” hail. He had to have his brand new roof replaced. Thankfully, insurance takes care of that.
 

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I go to church in a metal bldg. No service there either.
 
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