banding horns advice sought...

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Jcran, Oct 10, 2006.

  1. Jcran

    Jcran Well-Known Member

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    I bought a nice doe kid who was horned and while she's not much trouble, I still have concerns about any possible "down-the-road" issues. Now I am looking at two new does to buy, both with horns. So I am interested in using my elastrator to band their horns. I printed some info about it but would love to hear from the "horse's mouth". What advice can all y'all give me? The doe kid I already have is almost 10 months old. The other two I am considering are almost two years old. I've heard age DOES make a difference.
     
  2. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

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    My banding is in progress, in fact it just kicked off three days ago. I have bands on six animals. First I used a file to make a groove then applied two bands into the groove two make a biting on each other affect. Also if one breaks the other takes over....So far so good. Horns looked good on Boers for a while, well time up....bye bye horns...Good luck and keep in touch....Tennessee John
     

  3. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

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    :bouncy: my my.....you funny..... :goodjob:
     
  4. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    what you do is roll the band down the horn untill it is fastend at the hair line, there should be a natural groove to slip it in too up against the skill, as long as its fastend down in this natural groove it will stay and cut the horn off, best to do it in cool weather for the fly issue, and once its been on long enough the horn will just come off, probably will pop off when the goat least expects it and spook the animal depending on how it comes off.

    i dont know how it would work on a young goat whos horns are just now comming in, the only horns i took off were on animals who miss used their horns or had a pention for getting them into trouble some how, everyone else kept theres.
     
  5. goatkid

    goatkid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've heard that whenyou remove a goat's horns by banding them, there is a good chance they will grow back because the horn buds haven't been burned.
     
  6. chamoisee

    chamoisee Well-Known Member

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    My advice is not to band horns.

    If she's young enough, you can probably saw them off and then cauterize the area with a dehorning iron. I've gone into extensive detail on this method before on this forum. Most people don't have the stomach for it, and I can understand why.

    Or you can take her to a vet and have it done.

    Banding horns is fraught with trauma and complications.
     
  7. Terre d'Esprit

    Terre d'Esprit Boer-ing Mom

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    It worked fine with my Sannen/Boer cross. He did have a scur grow back, and I will band that when it freezes and the flies are gone. Initially, one horn came off just one day when he was outside, but the other horn came off when he was playing around, and there was more blood than with the other one (but not tons because it had been banded). It's definitely a YMMV type thing, but I would do it again-- it didn't seem to cause him any pain other than the initial banding, and that was okay within a couple of hours.

    I do agree with the poster who said that the horns will grow back if it's not banded down far enough.

    T
     
  8. fishhead

    fishhead Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Here's one farms experience with banding 60 goats.

    http://www.greatgoats.com/articles/dehorning_text.html

    It seems to have worked well for them.

    The wethers I borrowed this past summer are currently banded. I've been told they seem to be indifferent to the bands.

    Chamoisee, I've read that sawing horns is extremely painful. Is that your experience?
     
  9. chrisl

    chrisl Well-Known Member

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    Chamoisee do you have personal experiance with banding horns or is this opinon? I'm getting ready to do a couple of bucklings and a doeling and I want to be informed well on this subject.
    Chris
     
  10. moonspinner

    moonspinner Well-Known Member

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    I know many goat keepers who have banded many horns without problem. I'm sure you're going to get goats here and there who do not take well to this, but I still think most of the problems stem from not doing the procedure correctly. I personally would not feel comfortable tackling full blown large horns, but it can be done.
     
  11. chamoisee

    chamoisee Well-Known Member

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    I have experience with banding horns, sawing them off, having the vet do it surgically, disbudding, caustic paste, and using OB wire to saw them off. I've had hundreds of goats over a period of 14+ years. Here is my ranking of the methods, from best to worst:

    Disbudding- the best.

    Sawing them off (I used a saws-all, do NOT do it by hand!) and cauterizing with dehorning iron- if you're able to do it and have the help, this is the next best choice. Recovery is faster than one would think. It's very hard on the people, but provides excellent incentive to never neglect disbudding again.

    Surgical removal by vet- easier on the people, harder on the goat, longer recovery period, more skin loss on top of head.

    Banding- Fraught with complications. Sometimes it works fine, other times it's a nightmare. Goats can be traumatized and head shy for life, or they may turn out just fine. If you have feeders that they need to stick their heads into, this is even more problematic. The wobly horns get caught and the bleed like stuck pigs. There's also the CAE risk with blood all over the place, if you aren't 100% sure your stock is completely negative.

    OB wire- messy, painful, the last few strokes involve a horn dangling with OB wire eentangled and a goat screamign her head off and bleeding all over the place while you try to disengage the wire and finish removing the horn. Nightmare.

    Caustic Paste. I would rather butcher the goat or leave the horns on.
     
  12. stacygoats

    stacygoats Well-Known Member

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    Should you wait for a goat to finish growing their horns before you band them? The reason I ask is I bought a 2 year old % boer doe that only has 6 inch horns with a very flat blunt end. When I asked the previous owner if someone had sawed the top portion off she said she had tried banding. She thought the goat was around 7 monthes old when she notched and banded, but the horn below the band continued to grow, so by the time the band worked it took off the top portion only.
     
  13. chamoisee

    chamoisee Well-Known Member

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    Yep, that happens. At least the horns are smaller, I guess.
     
  14. Jcran

    Jcran Well-Known Member

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    Great info, thanks! Maybe I'll wait a bit. With my own goats, I religiously disbud.
     
  15. AnnaS

    AnnaS Well-Known Member

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    I've banded a couple of horns that the disbudder didn't get. One on a milking yearling, one on a dry yearling and one in progress on a 4 mo old doeling.

    I would band at as young an age as possible, based on my experience. The band doesn't bother them until it gets about halfway through the horn. Then if the horn is bumped, it is extremely painful- spontanious urination, running blindly around, screaming. Based on the reaction, I'd say it hurts worse than disbudding or kidding. The smaller the diameter of the horn when banded, the faster the whole thing will be over.

    If you can possibly pen the ones with banding "in progress" away from the herd, do so. They will not eat grain or hay out of group feeders for fear of getting that horn bumped, and they will drop to last in the pecking order because they will run if challenged and not hit back.
     
  16. Jcran

    Jcran Well-Known Member

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    That is a visual that really makes me think.
     
  17. pyrnad

    pyrnad Well-Known Member

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    I have had very good luck with banding. I do seperate the ones with the bands. I have never had a horn grow back.
    I never did the banding until 6 years ago. I had a nubian does udder punctured by another doe with horns. Now all of the horn get banded.