Bad hooves

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Spinner, Jun 10, 2006.

  1. Spinner

    Spinner Well-Known Member

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    I've been reading a lot and looking at photos on web pages. I've come to the conclusion that the goats I bought have badly overgrown hooves. They don't stand up straight like the pics show.

    Now I'm wondering if I can fix them or if it might be too late. I'm wondering if their leg bones have grown out of shape to compensate for the hooves. I may be worrying about nothing, but I want to be sure.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  2. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    get to trimming, for the most part you can correct alot of woes just by trimming strateagically, you may have to cut alot more than normal to get to a decent flat cerface and it may take a few rounds to get it right but you can fix it, cut them back untill the bottom flat part that they "SHOULD" walk on is parralel to the line made from where the leg joins the hoof, the fur line
    and then keep on any future hoof trimming so it doesnt get out of hand again
     

  3. witchysharon

    witchysharon Well-Known Member

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    Spinner....trust me...it is not too late. You wouldn't believe some of the hooves on rescued goats I've seen. Actually, these hooves look remarkably well if you could compare them to some of the hooves on the goats I've rescued you'd think your goats hooves are in great shape! They can recover from poor hoof care quite well. It takes times and consistant
    trimming to correct bad pasterns from hoof neglect.

    Yours look like they have splayed toes. to compensate for toes that are spread apart like that, cut the outer walls shorter than the inner walls. (the walls between the toes should be longer). From the picture, it appears as though you badly need to cut the outer walls of both the inside toe and outside toe anyway. Do that, but do not cut anything between the toes yet. You also might want to be sure the tips are also trimmed. once you trim the two outer walls, see if the toes are closer together when they are standing. I have to trim this way on over half my goats so their toes are together.
     
  4. christij

    christij Well-Known Member

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    I have some kids I bought that look about like that that I am slowly working on -- hoepfully the right way (they are my first goats!)-- so you are not alone! I just wish I could watch someone trim so I could be sure I'm dong it the right way!

    Christie
     
  5. Spinner

    Spinner Well-Known Member

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    ME TOO! I would gladly travel a reasonable distance and volunteer my time to work with someone and learn first hand about goat care. Is there anyone near SE Oklahoma who wants a temporary "hand". PM me if you are in the area and interested.
     
  6. Milk n' Honey

    Milk n' Honey Well-Known Member

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    This isn't near as bad as the goat we rescued that had hoof mange. I didn't think her hooves would ever recover but they did. You just have to trim and then wait a week or two and trim again and repeat until you get what you want out of them. Here is a great tip, the toes grow faster than the heels. Clean the outer part of the hoof wall really well (you can use a toothbrush and water) and then look at the growth lines. You need to trim with the growth lines. Your tendency will be to trim the same amount all the way around. This will not leave you with a properly trimmed hoof. If you follow the angle of the growth lines, you'll do great. Watch for pink. If you trim down so far and it starts to get pink, stop trimming in that spot. You can trim them as much as you want until you see pink in that area. Then if they aren't done, wait a week or two and trim again. Make sure you don't trim the inside part, just the edges. Also, it helps to scrape out the dirt, manure, rocks, etc so you can see where the inside hoof actually is!! Practice makes perfect!! Good luck!!
     
  7. christij

    christij Well-Known Member

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    What is meant by "inside"? The part closest to the sole? This is the first time I have heard of growth lines... I have so much to learn!
     
  8. comehomesoon

    comehomesoon comehomesoon

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    I am so glad somone is posting too cause even in books they do not describe it this well or talk about growth lines, any more info on this would be greatly appriciated. Pictures of bad trims and good trims and what you are talking about would help as well
     
  9. Spinner

    Spinner Well-Known Member

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    here's a link that has some drawings showing the growth lines. It explains hoof trimming fairly well. hoof care