Bad for rabbits?

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by jessandcody, Dec 28, 2003.

  1. jessandcody

    jessandcody Well-Known Member

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    KY
    We are going to be raising several rabbits for our own consumption, and we have a few questions.

    They will get pellets, but we also want to supplement their feed with vegetables from our garden. We know potatoes are not good for rabbits, but does anyone else know what is okay for them to eat? We are looking for more than carrots, spinach and lettuce.

    Also, what could be wild crafted to supplement their feed? We are both in college and on a pretty tight budget, so anything we can do for ourselves, the better off we will be.

    Thanks for any help!

    - Cody and Jess
     
  2. shaneymc

    shaneymc Well-Known Member

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    clover and dandelion leaves are good
     

  3. Thumper/inOkla.

    Thumper/inOkla. Well-Known Member

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    centeral Okla. S of I-40, E of I-35
    Ungreened potatoes are ok for rabbits to eat, not the above ground plant parts, I checked this on many sites and books,and I have in the past and do now feed potatoes in winter for a water suppy in the cage, the potaoes have very little nutrition, but the rabbits can nibble them for water when the bowls are frozen.

    I keep at least one rabbit for testing new foods on, with a tummy full of known safe foods, I add the new item. That way bunny is not so hungery that he will eat anything, the new food is added a little at a time, increasing it over 2 weeks. There are a few weeds that he will not eat, somethings he will nibble but doesn't like much, the other rabbits eat lots of.

    Most tree leaves are enjoyed very much. most of the garden herbs, I have one doe that really likes a mixed herb salad (all the kitchem herbs), the others won't eat half of the herbs offered to them. For limited treat status, dry bread products can be feed also, but rabbits really need the green foods most.

    If the tummy is full, they are not likely to eat something bad for them. Most vegetables and fruits people eat, a rabbit can, but in small amounts. start with just a taste, then just a little more each time. If they always have a food they know and like available they will eat it first. never just feed a new food the the whole herd at the same time, even if it is a pellet feed or hay from a new place, they need time for the gut to adjust.

    And of course, don't feed things that are known to be toxic.(houseplant and landscaping plants)
     
  4. AndreaR

    AndreaR Well-Known Member

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    Alberta, Canada
    Jess & Cody, check out the grocery stores for old (not moldy!) produce in the back storage. I have picked up free romaine lettuce(no iceberg lettuce..toxic to rabbits), carrots, fruit (remove mushy spots)etc this way. I ask a staff member if they have old produce and they take me to the back and let me rummage throught the stuff. Some days they don't have any. Check out low priced apples,cukes,carrots as they are cheaper produce. Here's a website for the kinds of fruits/vegs you can give your rabbits http://members.iinet.net.au/~rabbit/rabfod.htm

    Hope this helps...don't forget, you can grow vegs in containers on your patio/balcony and garden if you have the space. Ask some local farmers for straw or hay for the rabbits to munch on...you can get some 40-60 lb square (about 3ft by 1.5 ft rectangular) alfalfa/grass bales for $4-6 each. It goes a long ways to stretching the budget! I know, I've been a student too! :D And I enjoy my farm now for the space and cost efficient ways of growing own food. Good luck Andrea
     
  5. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    In the summer, I feed mine a few handfuls of fresh green grass twice a day, and in the winter I buy alfalfa cubes (the kind they feed to cows and horses) to feed them. The cubes are essentially the same as what goes into the rabbit pellets, just lots cheaper. I always make sure they have a mineral disk too.
     
  6. jessandcody

    jessandcody Well-Known Member

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    Thanks everyone - excellent responses. Gives us a lot to think about.....every penny counts.