Back up well pump

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by Bladesmith, Apr 8, 2005.

  1. Bladesmith

    Bladesmith Well-Known Member

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    our well uses a submersible pump to bring up our water. Well is about 100' (rough estimate) deep. If we were to lose power, or the pump go legs up on us, what secondary system could we install to continue bringing up water? I'm not adverse to old time hand pumps either. Just need some ideas,
     
  2. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    .............If I was going to prepare for the eventual demise of my pump\motor I would erect some type of structure with a pulley and winch of some sort of sufficient height to allow me\you to pull the 1 1\4" , schedule 80 pvc pipe . Then , I'd procure a new replacement pump\motor\check valve and sitback and wait for "IT" to die . WHEN , the pump does quit you're going to have to PUll the whole Pipe string and remove the "dead" motor before you make any decisions about what kind of pump to replace IT with . fordy.. :)
     

  3. mohillbilly

    mohillbilly Well-Known Member

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    I agree with fordy, If the pump fails or poiwer is out for an extended length of time, and you really need water BAD. You will have to pull the pump.


    As far as pulling the pump, I have pulled mine by hand with the aid of my wife using the pipe wreches for the "clamps". Mine hangs at 140 feet. and on pvc.

    So bottom line, you will have to pull the pump for any type of water. I cannot think of any REASONABLY priced jet pumps that will draw at 100'. that would be an option. check the true water depth, you are guessing 100'. How? Why ? You need to know! Drop a lead weight with a bobber on the end and measure out the amount of fishin line that goes down the hole. If its around 40 - 50 ft. you can use a jet pump in line with the well head. Proper valving and electrical connections are must.

    Otherwise pump it by hand, or go to the creek.
     
  4. Hip_Shot_Hanna

    Hip_Shot_Hanna Well-Known Member

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  5. Bladesmith

    Bladesmith Well-Known Member

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    I can see that when my pump goes, its really gonna suck then....(pun fully intended :haha: )
     
  6. mohillbilly

    mohillbilly Well-Known Member

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    one more option, Install a hand pump, but the type with the actual "pump" at the bottom of the well pipe, Then use apump jack oufit run by a gas engine or stick a windmill over the top of it, just like my garandpa used for years and years. old technology, but you can still buy all this stuff new. Cumberlands is one source, and their is one more but i cannot think of it right now
     
  7. farminghandyman

    farminghandyman Well-Known Member Supporter

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    actually you can do both on one pipe a electric sub pump and a hand or pump jack or windmill,

    my wind mill has a sub pump under it,

    look on page 27 of the windmill manual linked to here,
    http://www.vintagewindmills.com/Resources/Library/manufacturers/aermotor/Documents/aermotor1.pdf

    if your casing is to small for the tee, and the foot valve,

    one can use a bell reducer from your pipe size to a 3" pipe, and then about 12" nipple of 3" pipe, and then bell reduce it back down to the pipe size, also pick up a street ell of 3/4" and cut a hole and place the street ell inside the 3" nipple and weld it in to place, add a3/4" check valve to the nipple, in side the pipe.

    here is some pictures at the bottom of this post, in the below URL, I like the second system better, that is all in line,
    http://www.timebomb2000.com/upload/showthread.php?p=1068391#post1068391

    the cylinder will not pump well though the sub pump, but the sub pump will push water easily through the cylinder,

    and on top of the well put a stuffing box so the pump rod can pass, and either place a pump jack or hand pump type handle
    pump jacks can be ran by gas motor like a small briggs motor,

    NOTE: foot valves and check valve are not the same,

    if on the out side of the tee you use a foot valve, and if on the inside you need to use a check valve,(note: direction of flow) as in the 3" in line pipe, a foot vale will not work in side the nipple, but a check valve can work on the out side of the tee

    watch the arrow on the side that show the flow direction of the water it will need to flow so water will inter into the nipple, and be blocked in going out,
     
  8. leaping leon

    leaping leon Well-Known Member

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    Bladesmith, since you're in Florida and probably have a high water table, I would suggest that you put in a second shallow well. Be careful of the location, make sure it's away from any possible source of poisoning, such as your septic system or run-off from agriculture, etc. Lehman's sells a kit for hand-drilling a shallow well, so you can avoid having to get a permit and having to hire a $$$company to do it.

    You can then put a hand pump on a well up to about thirty feet deep (check it out, I don't know how much deeper a the cheaper-priced hand pumps go.) Or get one of the buckets that Lehman's sells, they're designed to go down a well pipe, and lift over a gallon at a time; they're shaped like a piece of pipe...or make your own out of pipe and rope or chain. You might want to have the water tested, and/or purify it some way to be safe...This eliminates the necessity of pulling your sub. pump before you can get water...in a sudden power outage this can be a real pain...and what if you're sick or you have an injured arm?

    I recently found some hand pumps online that claim they will pump water from 300 feet, but these are a lot of money...I can't remember exactly because I looked at so many options, but they may be running around $500, or more.

    I'm planning on putting in a shallow well with some sort of hand pump, in addition to the electric pump on our main well. I've lived through too many long power outages to feel good about not having additional means of acquiring water. I will never rely solely on electric again for water, heat and or cooking.
     
  9. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    Check out www.survivalunlimited.com. They have a hand pump that sits in your 4" casing beside your drop pipe for your main pump. The cylinder sits a little above where your electric pump would sit. Then when the power or the electric pump goes out all you have to do is pump the water by hand.
     
  10. Blu3duk

    Blu3duk Well-Known Member

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    If you are worried about just losing power from the electric company then a backup genset is what you could install as long as it had the availabe amp rating for 220 hookup as most all pumps are 220 and higher amps.

    My well is 8 inch, and over 700 feet total depth with the pump sitting around 600 feet give or take [it was done before i bought the place] the quote from the company that put it in to pul it and do any repairs that might need done last summer was $85 per hour and 3 hours to pull it, and 3 hours to put it back, and whatever it tok to fix it in between. fortunately it was only a relay which they had replaced a few months before we bought the place...

    What they suggested was to put in a 2000 gallon holding tank and a secondary pump so the main pump only had to kick in after about a 500 galllon draw down, saving the number of starts on the pump, thus extending the pump life, and the secondary pump motor would only have to be a 3/4 horse which could be a 110 or 220 motor as whatever we desired..... yeah it is an expense that would have to thought out and paid off over several years time.... but the added feature would be in house fire protection from wildfires as an added plus if set up for at the same time. and a handpum can be installed on the holding tank too.

    something to consider
     
  11. Jackpine Savage

    Jackpine Savage Well-Known Member

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