Babies!!!!!

Discussion in 'Goats' started by racecraz, Jan 6, 2007.

  1. racecraz

    racecraz New Member

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    Our nanny had babies the morning of Jan 2, a bit ahead of our expected due date. Anyway, this is her second kidding. She had 3 babies this time. 2 boys and a girl. The nanny(baby) didn't make it, she died on Jan 3. My question is to you, the nanny and one of the billies would not walk on the hooves. What causes this, is it because they are weak yet. We taped the billies leg for a day and it seems to be walking fine now. The tape is off. In a couple months the billies will be up for sale so if you want one please post.
    Thank You,
    Melissa
     
  2. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    MI
    It would be helpful to know what breed and where you're located in order for people to be interested.

    Did you actually see the kids eat? This is very important. It may be that the doeling was too weak to eat, and therefore starved to death. If that was the case you probably should've tube fed or bottled her.

    Good luck with your other babies, and where are the pictures? LOL
     

  3. racecraz

    racecraz New Member

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    Feb 15, 2005
    Our other nanny had babies yesterday Jan 7 . She had 2 billies. That is all that we seem to get from our 2 nannies. This is her second time kidding also. She is being a good mommy, too. Just like the other ones, these billies will be up for sale in a couple of months, too. All of our goats are pgymys, and we live in central Wisconsin.
     
  4. Jim S.

    Jim S. Well-Known Member

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    About the not walking on the hooves part, I assume they are "knee walking." This is a genetic defect in which the ligaments of the leg do not elongate properly as the fetus grows. The same situation arises in calves. Awful to watch, but they do recover on their own with time and begin walking on their hooves, as the ligaments stretch and elongate. This defect can sometimes create some leg problems later on, depending on the conformation of the animal. Most I have seen with it in my own experience have poor conformation (knock-kneed, cowhocked) and also tend to be poor doers. If I recall correctly, it is a recessive trait, so both parents must have it for it to be transmitted. Easiest way to eliminate it from the herd is culling, which I would recommend. If you cull the females and make all their offspring terminal, you eventually eliminate it from the herd because only the sire will have the gene. It will have been eliminated from the females. Please do not sell them to another producer without full disclosure. Hope this helps.

    In my own herd, I cull for triplets. Two kids max is what I am after. Triplets generally are poor doers, or one will die...but only after having taken resources from the other two while in the womb.

    UNDER EDIT: Oh yes, on the "too many billies" problem -- switch herd sires.