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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have these weedy shrubs all over the back 6 acres of our property. This is the first year I've really ever done anything with them though. I made 12 jars of autumn olive jam, and I've got autumn olive fruit leather dehydrating now. The jam is lovely deep red color and has a sweet, tangy fruity flavor. Just wonderful! I can't wait to try out the leather!

Do any of you use them? If so, what do you do with them?
 

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We have these weedy shrubs all over the back 6 acres of our property. This is the first year I've really ever done anything with them though. I made 12 jars of autumn olive jam, and I've got autumn olive fruit leather dehydrating now. The jam is lovely deep red color and has a sweet, tangy fruity flavor. Just wonderful! I can't wait to try out the leather!

Do any of you use them? If so, what do you do with them?
I was looking at a recipe for autumn olive wine today..I was thinking of riding out on horseback to collect some as there are tons of them out on the trails around here.

ETA, Then I remembered deer season and it will have to wait. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You'll have to tell me how the wine is. :) I imagine with the type of seeds they have, you couldn't use them for anything like pies, etc.
Maybe I'll do some experimenting. Everything I read says they contain more than 15 times the lycopene of red tomatoes. Sounds great, and tastes great too!
 

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I'm interested in them for erosion control. I'm ordering some for next spring to plant in a small gully that is developing across my land. By the way, does anyone here have experience with Goumi, which is supposed to be a larger relative of A.O.?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What are autumn olives?
They are an Asian relative to Russian Olives that were introduced into the US. They've naturalized all over the eastern US and are considered a nuisance plant or a weedy shrub in most areas. They have sweet berries that are nutritious and useful too. They make great jam, and leather (fruit roll ups), and supposedly, wine.

You can read more about them here; http://www.psa-rising.com/eatingwell/wild-foods/autumnolive.htm
 

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I went out and looked at the AO plants around here and they are completely bare.

Wine will have to wait until neat year.
 

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We have transplanted Autumn Olive to form a sort of privacy hedge. They are very fast growing. I did not realize the berries were edible. I will definitely have to try them. thequeensblessing, would you share your recipe for jam?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Sure! Here it is;

Autumnberry (autumn olive) Jam

8 cups Autumn olives, washed
1 cup water
1 pkg. powdered pectin
5 cups sugar

Place berries in large saucepot and add water.
Bring to a boil and then, lower heat and allow berries
to simmer for 20 minutes.
Run berries and juice through a food mill to extract seeds.
Measure out 3 1/2 to 4 cups of pulp.

Place pulp in saucepot. Add powdered pectin
Bring to a boil. Stir in sugar and return to a boil
stirring constantly. Boil hard for one minute.
Remove from heat and pour hot jam into
sterilized jars. Adjust lids and process in waterbath
canner for 10 minutes for half-pints, 15 minutes for pints.
 

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hmph. I'm too far west - sounds like something I would enjoy having a few of, especially around the chicken pen. Bet they would really like them too.
 

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We used to have a foundation planting of them around our house when I was young.. My siblings and I ate them when the berries were soft and loved to play 'house' w/ them.. Never knew what they were..Thanks...QB
 

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I had an AO hedge at my last house. Never did anything with the berries, though. The cedar waxwings loved them! :)
 

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are the skurge of the landscape in my mind. We planted a wildlife corridor of the darn things here on my farm when it went into the CRP program. I now have AO's all over the farm (200 acres), have to spray and mow yearly to keep them from taking over and they are overwhelming many of the native shrubs and grasses. There are places in the state where there are acres and acres of the things, very invasive, difficult to kill off and no longer on the recommended planting list for DNR, NRCS or USDA. I could shoot that wildlife biologist who told me I should plant them. I guess if you enjoy having acres of brush on your place then go for it . . .I prefer to have open fields around me and to be able to drive/ride/bike/walk across those fields. This is another one of those DNR mistakes, like multiflora rose was years before that. If I had my choice I would never plant any, wish I hadn't before, conservation districts are not allow to sell them anymore for this reason. I'd say think twice if your considering planting them and put them someplace where you can mow right up to them. Not only do the birds spread them high and wide but they send out suckers all over the place too. Sorry to you folks that like them and find a use for the berries, just wanted to let people know what they are getting into. End of rant, sorry folks, I feel strongly about this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yes, they are an invasive weed, for sure. I was merely pointing out that these invasives have a wonderful use! We hay our fields, so the shrubs don't ever get a foothold in our fields outside of where they are located right now. They haven't spread at all, and we like having them where they are as they attract the deer and make a great hunting spot. We also use the berries. If you can control them, it's not a bad thing to have on your place. If you can't control them, you may be sorry you introduced them. (although ours have grown wild, probably introduced by local birds, who, as Willow girl said, seem to also LOVE the berries.) Our honeybees also love the fragrant blossoms in the spring.
 

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I always thought they were just for the birds,got mine from the place that sends out trees with membership( wish I could remember the name)I break off a small limb and stick it in the dirt and have a new bush in no time.
The berries are red with tiny gold specks on them,the branches are slender and straight.So far they have not been invasive.
 

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thequeensblessing, thanks for the recipe. I will have to wait for the next crop of berries to try this. By the way, the bears really like these berries, they have done a good bit of damage to our "privacy hedge" this year.
 
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