Austrees

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Unregistered-1427815803, May 6, 2004.

  1. I was wondering if any of you have had any experience with Austrees. They almost sound too good to be true. But I sure am thinking about trying them.
    Any info, whether good or bad, is much appreciated. Thanks..
    Sherry
     
  2. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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  3. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    My inlaws are moving to western AZ near the NV border on the river and want fast growing trees. Sure would appreciate any info on these trees too. Thanks.
     
  4. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    is nv. a country?? the trees are banned in some areas as an invassive speices, you might want to ck. the state ruling before buying them. i read you can start them from cutting or slips they can be used for graze after the first yr is what the article reported but they are water hogs ,will find water or sewer lines to obtain water as with all willow speices.
     
  5. DW

    DW plains of Colorado Supporter

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    Yes, they're good but let me tell you the cheap way. I have my originals f/Rocky Mtn. Austrees in Colo. Springs. Four Seasons(and another name/same co.) have this same tree but not called Austrees. These are WAY cheaper but grow just as well. Through the years what I have discovered to the trick are fertilizer stakes. I still order the stakes from Colo. Springs around $.50 each, I just have not looked for another place and/or method. I use the stakes spring & fall. Here in Colo., the more you water, the faster they grow. In Colo. you must water any tree quite a bit to get started.
     
  6. Southerngurl..that was a great site..thank you so much! And DW and James..thanks for the replies!
    I am needing a north wind break. On the site..they said they were water hogs and that the roots come to the top. I didn't see the part about them procreating so fast. I am wanting to put them along the north fence. So it will give us some wind break for the house and give some livestock a windbreak and give some protection for our driveway from the blowing snow. Out there, it will not be very close to water lines, etc.
    Any more info or experiences would be greatly appreciated. I was wondering..in the other catalogs..if they are not called Austrees...what are they called? Thanks a bunch everyone!
     
  7. gccrook

    gccrook Well-Known Member

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    I believe that Austrees are really just a hybrid willow or hybrid poplar. Those can be had cheaper many places. I have not tried yet, but they are supposed to be easy to start from cuttings. I have planted some hybrid willows and some hybrid poplars, and they do grow fast if watered well. They are however a soft wood that might not stand up to high winds as well. Alos, I was told by a friend that they will send roots out, up or any where possible to find water.
     
  8. Jimmy Mack

    Jimmy Mack Well-Known Member

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    Sherry,

    If your looking for plant material for a wind break that grows fast how about some Cottonwoods/Poplars or silver maples. These varieties are not a long lives as others and the faster growth makes the branches more suceptible to breakage. On the flip side, with proper watering it would only take a few years to create a wind screen with these trees.

    If its a real difficult location try one of the hardy, drought tolerant Ash variety. Not as fast growing and one of the last trees to leave out in the Spring but they are tough trees.

    Best of luck, Jimmy
     
  9. Locust trees grow quickly and have early foliage, and live much longer than poplars. The are a member of the pea family and will fix nitrogen, thereby helping other plants under their canopy. They also have beautiful cascading flowers that smell like honey. There are relatively thornless varieties, and others that are very thorny.

    If you want a snow break, think more along the lines of a conifer, pine, cedar etc

     
  10. Mullers Lane Farm

    Mullers Lane Farm Well-Known Member

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    We planted our Austrees last week. Thankfully it has been raining almost every day since then! :) They are a hybrid cross of poplar x willow which makes them fast growers. The more water, the faster they grow.

    Ours are mulched in with rabbit manue for fertilizer. We marked a couple to see how fast they actually grow.