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Discussion Starter #1
There are a number of different types of Australian immigration, classed under different categories of visa:

Employment visas - Australian working visas are most commonly granted to highly skilled workers. Candidates are assessed against a points-based system, granting points for certain standards of education. These types of visas are often sponsored by individual states, which recruit workers according to specific needs. Visas may also be granted to applicants sponsored by an Australian business. The most popular form of sponsored working visa is the 457 visa

Student visas - Foreign students are actively encouraged to study in Australia by the Australian Government. There are a number of categories of student visa, most of which require a confirmed offer from an educational institution.

Family visas - Visas are often granted on the basis of family ties in Australia. There are a number of different types of Australian family visas, including Contributory Parent visas and Spouse visas.

Skilled Visas - A new electronic process for managing Australia's Skilled Migration Program. Intending migrants without an Employer Sponsor will need to complete an "Expression of Interest" (EOI), then based on the information provided, will be allocated a score against the points test. Skill Select will then rank intending migrants scores against other EOI's. - The highest ranking scores across a range of occupations may then be invited to apply for a Skilled Visa.


Employment and family visas can often lead to Australian citizenship, however this requires the applicant to have lived in Australia for at least four years with at least one year as a Permanent Resident.

Humanitarian programme - Refugee - "for people who are subject to persecution in their home country, who are typically outside their home country, and are in need of resettlement. The majority of applicants who are considered under this category are identified and referred by UNHCR to Australia for resettlement. The Refugee category includes the Refugee, In-country Special Humanitarian, Emergency Rescue and Woman at Risk visa subclasses."

Special Humanitarian Programme - "for people outside their home country who are subject to substantial discrimination amounting to gross violation of human rights in their home country, and immediate family of persons who have been granted protection in Australia. Applications for entry under the SHP must be supported by a proposer who is an Australian citizen, permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen, or an organisation that is based in Australia."

The Humanitarian program for 2012–13 is set at 20,000 places, an increase of 6,250 from the previous year. This category includes a 12 per cent target for Woman at Risk visas. This allocation also includes Onshore Protection visas granted to people who apply for protection in Australia and are found to be refugees.

In 2010–11, a total of 13,799 visas were granted under the Humanitarian Program. A total of 5,998 visas were granted under the offshore component, including 759 Woman at Risk visas. In addition, 2,973 Special Humanitarian Program visas were granted to people outside Australia.

A total of 4,828 visas were granted to people in Australia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immigration_to_Australia
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If we allowed immigrants at the rate of Australia (.8%) we would have 2.6 million immigrants per year.

We have about 800K legal immigrants per year today.
 

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Wait until they have do deal with the results. The US was pretty open to people coming in to develop the country. That philosophy runs into problems when the jobs have been deported en mass while people are imported en mass. nAnd you have to support the imports without the tax base to do so.

But they probably will do better than the US as they have plans to deport people without skills and an actual job.
 

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Wait until they have do deal with the results. The US was pretty open to people coming in to develop the country. That philosophy runs into problems when the jobs have been deported en mass while people are imported en mass. nAnd you have to support the imports without the tax base to do so.

But they probably will do better than the US as they have plans to deport people without skills and an actual job.
The past decade in the US saw an increase between 2000 and 2012 of 9.7 million legal immigrants. Legal...

The undocumented illegal population is an estimated 11.7 million. Not legal.... aka illegal....

https://www.americanprogress.org/is...10/23/59040/the-facts-on-immigration-today-3/
 

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People wake up an immigration policy is not open borders.....it is a planned system with a goal to achieve a better future for for the current country population. It is not evil. How many people can live in you home be for it is a disaster.
Many of would actually like to see an immigration policy but not amnesty for the illegals who are already here. Send every illegal back, set up some intelligent policies that protect the US taxpayer and a lot of us would support it. Amnesty in any way, shape or form, NO WAY.
 

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If we allowed immigrants at the rate of Australia (.8%) we would have 2.6 million immigrants per year.

We have about 800K legal immigrants per year today.
Australia's population is only 23 million and the country is still establishing, the country needs more immigrants so their immigration rate is set in accordance with its needs. Australia has a good immigration system. America's population is around 14 times more than Australia's and America is already well established, it doesn't actually need new immigrants, it simply allows it. A million or less per year is a practical allowable immigration rate for America.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hmm

Isn't it a little harder to sneak across the border into Australia? :rolleyes:

Also, don't most immigrants here go to low skill, no skill jobs?
Again, you are just so darn smart.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Australia's population is only 23 million and the country is still establishing, the country needs more immigrants so their immigration rate is set in accordance with its needs. Australia has a good immigration system. America's population is around 14 times more than Australia's and America is already well established, it doesn't actually need new immigrants, it simply allows it. A million or less per year is a practical allowable immigration rate for America.
I think we agree, not sure..
 

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Again, you are just so darn smart.
Not necessarily, but i was not sure of the point of your OP.

Sounds like Australia has a very tidy immigration policy, but if the point was to compare Australia with the U.S., it would be like comparing apples to oranges, IMO.

It's a completely different situation, not even taking into consideration, people would rather immigrate to the U.S., for obvious reason, opportunity, anyway.

The vast majority of immigrants here - legal and illegal, take low skill jobs, which is why businesses want them here.

They could build a wall to keep out Mexicans, if that's what they really wanted to do.

But they don't, GOP or Dems, IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
President Obama vowed again in an interview that aired Sunday on "Face the Nation" to press ahead with executive actions reforming America's immigration system, saying House Republicans had over a year to pass the Senate's bipartisan reform bill, and they failed to act.

He added that Congress still has time to pass a bill, saying it would take time to implement any executive actions, and that legislation would supersede any administrative changes he might make.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/what-if-anything-should-obama-do-about-immigration/
 

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The vast majority of immigrants here - legal and illegal, take low skill jobs, which is why businesses want them here.
That is absolutely untrue ... at least when it comes to legal immigrants. Do you know what it takes for a US company to bring an employee in legally? They REALLY have to want them here.

First, a US employer has to advertise in the US for 6 months. If they are unable to find a person with the specific skills they are looking for, they may hire from outside of the US. They have to apply for a work visa for this person. This takes months (possibly years) to process. The visa is good only for a limited amount of time (6 years for H1B - most common type of work visa). There are limits on how many visas can be awarded in each category per year as well as limits per country of origin. This means, that people coming from countries with high population (like India or China) may end up waiting years before they fit into a quota.

There are certain exceptions - actors, high level athletes, corporate executives, super models and Nobel prize winners get priority and are allowed to enter without any wait.

There is also slightly faster process for people who are currently employed by US companies overseas. They can enter under the L1 visa (intra-company transferee). The employees must work directly for the company for at least a year prior to visa application, may stay for a maximum of 5-7 years (depending on specific category within the L1 visa) and have to apply to renew their visa after 3 years.

With all these restrictions, legal immigrants who are sponsored by US companies are usually well educated and work high paying jobs. However, I imagine that most people go on to become permanent residents (green card holders) and some choose to become citizens. You have to be a permanent resident for at least 5 years before you apply for citizenship. To become a permanent resident & eventually citizen, you must not be a criminal and you must pay taxes (failure to pay taxes automatically disqualifies you).

None of this is cheap ... I was sponsored by a US employer,got a green card and eventually became a citizen. From start to finish, this process took more than 8 years and cost approx. $4,000 in fees. This is just fees submitting forms, paying for fingerprinting, etc. I did not use a lawyer. Back when I was going through the process, a lawyer would charge $4,000 to $10,000 to file for a green card (in addition to the cost of fees). A lot of businesses will hire a lawyer to handle this if they do not have an immigration attorney on staff. Today, all of the fees the government charges are much higher as well. I have no idea what immigration lawyers charge these days.

No business will invest this amount of time & money in a low-skill worker. I do not know a single legal immigrant who works a minimum wage job. The ones I personally know are RNs, software developers, business analysts and corporate executives and - at minimum - make close to 6 figures a year.
 

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Hmm

Isn't it a little harder to sneak across the border into Australia? :rolleyes:

Also, don't most immigrants here go to low skill, no skill jobs?
Immigration is one of the bedrocks to our nation.
A new report from the Partnership for a New American Economy found more than 40 percent of Fortune 500 companies were founded by immigrants or their children. Eighteen percent (or 90) of the 500 companies had immigrant founders. The children of immigrants started another 114 companies.
http://www.forbes.com/sites/stuarta...nies-founded-by-immigrants-or-their-children/

The study concluded that 33% of venture-backed companies that went public between 2006 and 2012 had at least one immigrant founder at the helm. The study also found that those public, venture-backed companies with at least one immigrant founder represent a market capitalization of $900 billion.
http://www.fastcompany.com/3015616/...out-whos-really-starting-companies-in-america


Immigrants represent 13% of the U.S. population but account for nearly 20% of small businesses owners. Immigrant-owned small businesses employed nearly five million Americans in 2010 and generated an estimated $776 billion in revenue, according to a June 2012 study from the Fiscal Policy Institute. The Partnership for a New American Economy, a bipartisan group of more than 500 business leaders and mayors, has found that more than 40% of Fortune 500 companies were founded by immigrants or a child of immigrants.
http://online.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052702303290904579278173121185300

If you look at U S patents filed by immigrants the picture is about the same.

Please note that immigrants include second generation. This is because quite often the second generation is very motivated to succeed by the first generation.

Jim
 

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................The only area's with habitable living climatic conditions are mainly alone the coast ! The interior is very dry and hot and they've got way more poisionous snakes than the US ever had ! IF we had salt water crocs in the Rio Grande we wouldn't need any border fences and drug importation would be way down . , fordy
 

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I wonder what Australia would think if suddenly the US started deporting illegals here to Australia instead of back to their home country.

But I agree that many immigrants have historically increased the vibrancy of life. But those things are not so straight forward as they were in the past. The liberal litany of how abused immigrants and minorities are, along with the assertion of the evil of profit, has changed people from adventurous entrepreneurs into stagnant whiners. If not in the first generation, by the first generation sent off to college.
 

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I wonder what Australia would think if suddenly the US started deporting illegals here to Australia instead of back to their home country.
That is such a weird, off the wall thing to say. I wonder why you would even think of such a strange thing that would cause so much bad blood between countries, and then post about how you wonder about it? Do you have some kind of evil grudge against Australia? :confused:
 
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