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Discussion Starter #1
You read that right. We were planning on getting Pyrenees to protect our acres, but then I learned that they also run off deer. We plan to feed them and take a few for the freezer.

As luck would have it, our neighbor's mixed Terrier got pregnant with their Oz Cattle Dog. Unexpectedly. Shotgun wedding aamof.

Given that we already have experience with Westies guarding our last place in France, I agreed to take two pups. With terriers on the job, cats are not needed. Cats complicate things even though I enjoy them a lot. I've seen our terriers kill a rat in 5 seconds flat.

These are the most energetic little pups ever. The male will resolutely follow me everywhere if unfamiliar people are around. Very loyal. Here is the female.
 

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If you have enough property they should have a fine time most dogs that have a hyper active nature need space and you need to get them acclimated to other animals you intend or have.
 

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Shouldn't have any problems with anything getting your chickens with that thing around. (Mainly because you won't have any chickens after the six year "training phase".)
 

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What would be a crazy mix is a Chihuahua and a pit bull or more commonly known and feared as a bulluaha, it's has no fear, is an ankle biter and can fit under the couch.
 

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Time and patience and lots of one on one training. Hope you don't have to many cat lovers in the neighbor hood.

It took me about two years to get the Airedale / Heeler cross I have on the straight and narrow. Yeah I lost a few birds along the way.
 

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Love them Heelers. My DD had one and I was never afraid of her living alone - anyplace. I had a Heeler, Aussie mix. Great dog. The Aussie mix toned down the Heeler - except when he was chasing rabbits - Had an electric fence he'd cross, then whine on the other side for me to undo it so he could get home. Very single minded.
Never liked Terriers. Now I have a Staffordshire Bull Terrier mix. Sticks to me like glue.
 
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I have always had either Siberian Huskies or Malamutes, then comes my Cattie Mae....got her at 8 yrs old and she is now about to turn 14. Cross of ACD/GSD...sticks to me like glue, very loyal and has no fear of ripping into something or someone should the need arise if I am threatened.
 

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There was a dog cross like that in an animal shelter that I inspected. Had been adopted a few times, but always brought back. Two high energy breeds crossed with far different instincts, created a nightmare. With the hundred different breeds of dogs, I cannot think of a worse cross.
Terriers are in ground hunters, hence tera ferma, earth, in their name. Healers have an intense instinct to herd cattle, and sometimes anything that moves, by heal nipping.
Either breed should only be owned by someone that can keep the dog busy, a well structured job. For a terrier that would be lots of rodents and plenty of digging area. For a healer that would be a good size herd of cattle that need moved frequently.
 

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Haypoint...I agree to a point. We have an ACD/GSD mix, she was high energy when she came to us at 8 years of age, would go after anything that was on our farm, and our horses were an issue which took a lot of time and patience, a few grumbles and yelling at her a few times, to get her to stop biting the heels, as she got kicked good by one of the drafts. What I taught her to do, is she would dart back and forth barking, threatening and look at me for direction. It worked and she was "safer" that way.

Never had a dog this smart and who saw things a lot quicker than I did. One of the best dogs I have ever had, faithful and yes, we walked all the time, threw sticks, balls, played chase, she worked the farm and I made sure each day to expend the energy she had. I had originally taken her in to foster her, retrain her, etc. but she bonded with me, then when I realized, as you said, they herd by nipping, we decided to keep her as I didn't want her ending up in a shelter somewhere.

Cattie Mae is now 14 years old and while pretty grey in the face, still one hell of a dog.
 

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Haypoint...I agree to a point. We have an ACD/GSD mix
IMHO, a German Shepard is a dog with instincts to react on human voice commands, as is a cattle dog, while a Jack Russell is a high energy of instinct motivated digging, biting, jumping fireball.
That you obtained a middle aged dog and you apparently had the time to satisfy that energy was a big help. No one should ever own a working dog breed that cannot provide a constructive outlet for that energy. No one should ever own a Jack Russell unless they have a constructive outlet for their digging/hunting instincts. I cannot imagine a home/family/situation/owner that could satisfy the mixed up mess of Cattle Dog/Jack Russell puppy. But that is just my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
We're getting our chickens and coop today. We'll start the kids on working with the puppies, individually, to accept and protect the feathered friends.
 

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Work with them, each dog is different in what it takes to get them to listen to you. I've found a shock collar is a good tool for when they are off a leash, you can deliver discipline from a distance instantly. A cow dog and a terrier are both smart, independent working dogs that can forget to listen when they have a bit of freedom, this is where the long reach of a shock collar is handy.

You'll enjoy your dogs, terrier / cow dog cross isn't that uncommon and makes a good companion for some one in the outdoors a lot. The pups and your kids will have some good times and make some great memories.
 

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Best of luck! I have also heard of Great Pyrenees protecting deer, so I really don't think it's a blanket trait. There are also many many other LGD breeds as well if GP's don't fit your bill.
 

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I had a JRT/ACD mix for 13 glorious years. I got him when he was just 7 weeks and 2 lbs. He was the most energetic dog until later in life. He was also the most LOVING dog I've ever had. He was a cuddle monster, and he was truly my best friend. Yes they are work, but they are FUN! Some day I'll get another dog, but I can honestly say whole-heartedly, no dog will ever have my heart the way this guy did. He is a part of soul forever. He got me through tremendous heartache. He absolutely loved to play in the snow, catch snowballs, splash in mud puddles, play with sticks and chase critters, bite the vacuum cleaner, etc. Just great joy every single day. Greatest mix of two dogs I could have ever gotten. He was my best hello and one my hardest goodbyes.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Hello Sir, I hope that you get another heeler mix soon to bring back some of that joy and companionship. Our heeler mix dogs have turned out very well. We let them go right into the coop when they were pups. The rooster got one on the nose, and ever since they have not bothered the chickens. In fact, we can get them to help herd the chickens off of where we don't want chicken poop, but they never hurt the chickens.

They are wary at night, barking at bobcats, but have enough sense to sit silent when packs of coyotes are nearby howling. We added a third pup recently who is heeler mix German shepherd, and he's still young but seems to be fitting in. We added him because of the coyotes, thinking that three dogs are safer together, and he's going to be bigger too.

And what affectionate dogs they are! The male will leap up in the air over twice his height in joy when he sees us, then lie down for a rub. One curious phenomenon is jealousy between the dogs regarding affection. The male heeler absolutely will not let us pet the others unless we pet him too. He comes a-runnin' and noses in on the affection. He'll actually growl off the puppy if he tries to horn in on affection time. I wonder how that will sort out when the puppy is the biggest dog....
 

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These breeds are way too much energy for me, hoping you have the time to train. This could be the best little dog ever but will need training and be kept constantly busy.
My ‘rescue’ mutt I am afraid has some of those breeds (DNA test has been sent away), I’m losing my mind. Can’t wear the darn thing out, he’s on the kitchen table when I leave the house, incapable of leaving the cat alone, he sees a bike out on the street and just goes, wow. Every time I see any herding breed pup for sale on fb farm pages I want to say do your homework!
 
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