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Hi All,

I'm having a heck of a time with my new well pump. The old pump split out at the pump bearings. It was installed in '84, and rebuilt in '98. We bought the place in '01. I went to Sears and got a new pump, exactly the same as the old except a 1 hp instead of a 3/4 hp. With all the discounts, horsetrading, etc. I paid $214.00. I thought I got a good deal...

But......

I have two problems that are driving me nuts.

1. The smaller well hose fitting just will not stop dripping at the pump housing thread. The pump housing is a very hard black plastic. I've seen it before..it's tough stuff. I went to Home Depot and got new fittings and Teflon tape. The fittings were gray plastic, threaded on one end to go into the pump and the other end "barbed" to fit into a hose, then tighted by a hose clamp. I've wrapped two different threaded 1 1/4 fittings with Teflon. The first fitting I wrapped with one layer of tape, the second fitting I wrapped with 3-4 layers of Teflon. I cinched them up to what I though snug, but not super tight. I'm afraid I'll strip the threads. At 40# they just start leaking and at shut offf of 60#, both still dripped about a drop a second...What's going on? The other grey fittings don't leak. Should I try a different plastic fitting, or even copper...or did I get a bad female thread in the pump housing? Your thoughts would be appreciated.

2. I have a lot of dripping condensation on the copper piping from the pump to about 30 feet away. The pipes are 1/2". The cellar is a dirt floor, 5' in height, and granite foundation. The water is cold!!! Do you think I should insulate the pipes to stop the condensation?

Again, thanks one and all...you guys always have great advice!!! :)


He who is little and swims against the tide.
 

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agmantoo
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Smelt, go back to the hardware and get a metal barbed fitting and put the teflon tape on it and then thread into the pump housing and the leaking should stop. As for the pipe sweating that should not be a problem with the dirt floor. What about freezing in the winter? It would only cost a few dollars to buy the pipe insulation while you are at the store.
 

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1. Shut it down, drain it, remove the fitting, clean and retap the threaded hole with a standard pipe thread tap. Wrap a black iron or brass fitting with a wrap of teflon tape coverage that covers 50% of the last layer, pull til snug. Once you recieve resistance to the pull equal to the pressure that you get from a pull rope hand start lawn mower - add about 3/8ths more of a circle to the pull - but not more than 5/8ths. Pipe thread is tapered to create a tight fit, thread disortion is exspected for a tight seal, crowd it but not too much. Be glad you have water clean enought that there are no little particles that fill the spaces and stop the leaks.

2. Sounds like humidity, where are you located, I cannot tell by the info in the review of the post via the scrolldown.
 

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I think the gray plastic is not supposed to be wrapped in teflon tape. That could be your problem with the drip.
 

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agmantoo
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The grey plastic fitting is a molded part and the threaded section is out of round. Screwing the plastic into a metal housing would cause the plastic to conform. Since the pump body is a type of plastic it is difficult/risky to tighten the barbed fitting to where it will conform. The metal barbed fitting I recommended will be round as it will be a die threaded part and will work with the pump body.
 

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Are you rapping the teflon tape the right direction on the threads?If you rap it wrong it will peel off as you tighten......
 

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I was replumbing a trailer several years ago that had several plastic to metal connections at the faucets. When I took them loose I noted that the plastic threads had been lightly coated with solvent prior to installation. None of these connections had ever leaked! I have since used this method on both hot and cold water lines and have had no leaks that I know of. In the past I have tried teflon tape and paste as well as stick pipe dope on plastic to metal connections and had them seep about a third of the time.

Using solvent on a fitting going into a pump I would be extra careful to only use enough to dampen the threads of the plastic fitting and take care to ensure that none gets into the impeller or on any other plastic parts in the pump.

Good luck!
 
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