aspargus from seed???'s

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by jackie c, Sep 27, 2004.

  1. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    I've started and asparagus bed from seed last year. They did get some very small spears this year and I let them go to the ferny stage (which is recommended). I was wondering if anyone has any tips on getting this bed producing all that is possible. What kind of fertilizer/when, winter mulch? Thanks all in advance :)
     
  2. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    I put rotted manure on my every fall before I tuck it in (mixed leaves) During the summer, I used to give it nothing. This year, I gave them a dose of the Algoflash all purpose. It didn't seem to make a difference.
     

  3. steff bugielski

    steff bugielski Well-Known Member

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    I mulch and keep it weed free . those little spears will get bigger each year. I leave only the first spear in each clump to go to fern stage. i pick every thing else. I would leave a few the second year also.
    steff
     
  4. dla

    dla Well-Known Member

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    My books say it takes three years to establish asparagus, and that it does not tolerate weeds well.
    We were happy to inherit a fine asparagus plot when we moved here, but I am the only one who will eat any!!!
    Blesses the neighbors more than my family....
     
  5. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    Well lucky you! Asapagus is my absolute, all time favorite veggie! How big is your plot? I keep starting new plants every year, can't get enough of them :D Sure will be glad when I don't have to buy any more, boy are they expensive :no:
     
  6. diane

    diane Well-Known Member

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    It takes three years to fully establish an asparagus patch from ROOTS. With seed, add another year. I would not cut any next year either, just let those roots get good and strong. The following year don't cut anything with a smaller diameter than a pencil, and only cut for a couple of weeks. The year after that the same thing, but you can cut for about 6 weeks. After that....go for it!! We throw a nice layer of compost on ours in the spring and in the fall. They like lots of water also and as weed free as possible.
     
  7. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    Jackie,
    Growing asparagus from seed can be very satisfying, because you can choose varieties to your liking. My experience in the past was positive with growing them from seed here in the northland. (NW Ontario). I grew at least 4 varieties, including the purple ones and the selective (male) ones that gave the largest spears. The best seed I got was from Lindengergs in Brandon, Manitoba and not expensive.
    I started the seen in 3 inch peat squares with a starter mix having composted sheep or rabbit manure/peat/vermiculite or some such similar mix you might be familiar with. These grow 'ferny' into small plants which went into raised beds that have to be weed free (which they are not at the present :eek: ), and well endowed with fertilizer. Nitrogen richness won't harm them to grow well the first year. The second year you may expect a small harvest, but leave enough growth for the plants to strengthen further for the 3rd year of good harvest.
    Quack grass is the bane of asparagus growing and keeping the plot weed free. If you challenge that well enough to keep the asparagus to outcompete the weeds, you'll succeed. Weeding and nitrogenous fertilizing go well with growing asparagus. Growing from seed is the way to go, in my opinion and get lots growing, but it takes a couple of seasons to get there.

    Rich