Asparagus

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by nubiannana, Apr 17, 2006.

  1. nubiannana

    nubiannana Willow Pond Farm

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    Mar 26, 2006
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    I need any information on when, how to and where, for planting Asparagus. And is it too late? I live in Oklahoma and it's already 90 degrees! ugh!!!
    Thank you!
    And is it too late to plant garlic?
     
  2. Darryl_MO

    Darryl_MO New Member

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    Jan 3, 2006
    Here's a site with lots of asparagus information. About all I do for upkeep on my bed is to put an approximately 3 - 4 inch layer of manure on it in late fall and cover that with a straw mulch. The DUMBEST thing I ever did was to plant a 'gift' sprig of spearmint near the asparagus bed before I knew of it's aggressive spreading characteristics. I've been fighting it ever since.

    http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/1000/1603.html

    I'm not sure about garlic, but I think it's traditionally planted in the fall. Might work in Spring, though.
     

  3. randy in central missouri

    randy in central missouri Well-Known Member

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    May 11, 2002
    Location:
    missouri
    last year was year 3, i did not pick any. just letting it do its thing. i kept the mulch on until last week. no spears? i pulled all the mulch. could something have killed it. or just behind because of the mulch. several neighbors have been picking for awhile. help
     
  4. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    No, it's not too late for planting garlic. The bulbs will be smaller and later, depending upon variety and type. If they are softnecks, you quite certain to get proper divided bulbs. If hardnecks, they will again be later but may also only be large undivided rounds, depending upon the specific variety.

    Martin
     
  5. Mid Tn Mama

    Mid Tn Mama Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Martin: explain please the large undivided cloves--what causes that?

    Recently, I dug up some big volunteers that I thought I missed digging up last summer. They were large undivided colves--kind of like a big green onion. Is it the variety? Do they taste the same?
     
  6. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    It depends upon many factors. If an entire bulb is missed, all cloves will become individual plants but there will not be enough growing space and nutrients to become big enough to multiply. I have that happening right now intentionally with a cluster of plants growing from an unknown softneck variety. They are being used for cooking as garlic scallions. In other words, the same as green onions except that they are garlic. Watch farmers markets for them as they are now becoming quite popular. It's one way of being able to enjoy fresh garlic in the spring when no bulbs are available.

    Another factor would be the amount of time to grow and length of day. Garlic growth peaks around the longest day of their growing cycle and they react to the days becoming shorter. All garlic first becomes a simple round bulb and then later divides. If it is not divided by the time that the plant thinks that it should be mature, it will remain a round. If they are then planted back, they become an even larger divided bulb the following year. They are just as edible and tasty as if they were divided and again you may find them in the gourmet section of a store as they are being marketed as rounds.

    Then there is elephant garlic and its close relatives which are difficult for those in the extreme northern zones. For me, it takes 2 years to get a divided bulb from regular elephant garlic. But it grows like weeds in the southern zones. When it becomes wild and crowded in the South, it too produces only rounds due to crowding. Add to the extreme such as Babbington's leek which is almost identical to elephant garlic but seldom makes more than a simple two for one split.

    So, now you know!

    Martin