Asp?

Discussion in 'Countryside Families' started by ceresone, Nov 27, 2006.

  1. ceresone

    ceresone Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Reading the various posts, makes we want to ask a question about my step-grandson. doctors havent seemed to give a accurate diagnosis, perhaps the people here can!
    he's now 8 years old-seems to be doing fair in school, despite the other boys never able to communicate with him. he lives in his own world a lot, when disiplined, he just rolls his eyes back and tunes his parents out. he says he feels as if he comes from a different world, and noone here understands him. all this despite the fact he is very bright, his immagination is always in overtime, teacher asked children to write about this city the could invent, including mayor, councilmen, police, etc. normal subject, right?except he made a city ran and controlled by robots!! i dont know as he is anti-social as much as he cant find anyone who can live in their immagination as he does.
    i'm sure this isnt much to go on--but does it sound familiar in any way?
     
  2. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Does he have texture issues...foods and clothing?

    How is he with giving/receiving affection w/ family? Eye Contact?

    He does sound like he has some Asperger and/or autistic qualities, but there is a very large range with a given diagnosis (mild to severe)...

    The school guidance counselor should be able to point the parents to a clinic and/or doctor that specializes in testing/diagnosis/therapy.
     

  3. MarleneS

    MarleneS Well-Known Member

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    Teachers are trained for signs that a student may need to be seen by a specialist for learning or social disabilities. If your grandson (I hate people being called steps), has been examined by his family doctor and he did not advise additional medical testing, and his parents are not concerned, and the teachers do not have a problem with his learning abilities, I would leave him be.

    With all the labeling, and pushing for cookie cutter children, we may end up keeping them from reaching their greatest potential. If you could know the future would you rather see him grow up to be the next Steven Speilburg, or the weird person who has been on meds for most of his life because he's different?

    Hugs,
    Marlene
     
  4. ceresone

    ceresone Well-Known Member Supporter

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    he does Not want to be hugged, or kissed, very stand-offish, and obcessive/compulsive nothing in his room can be moved, upsets him terribly, hand-washing, etc. he has been taken to best dr's in state, but they seem to be more concerned in his dragging one foot, than anything. he's also in IEP (?) program, and on ridalyn. lol--sorry bout the step, he's just a hard child to get close to-but mostly because he wants instead to talk about out of space aliens he's been to visit. thanks all
     
  5. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    You might suggest they try him on a celiac diet. My autistic daughter began to make eye contact only after she had been on the celiac diet for a while. There is a strong link with autism and celiac.
     
  6. MarleneS

    MarleneS Well-Known Member

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    The additional information makes a world of difference. He's gone from being a somewhat anti-social, creative young man to having serious medical issues. :( Sorry, about the misunderstanding. It's amazing that he's been to all the best doctors and no one has been able to pinpoint what is the best means by which to help him.

    And please don't let my quirks be a problem for you. I have a problem with being being called step anything because it has never had a helpful connection to it. Probably got it start with all those fairytales about mean stepmothers, and ugly stepsisters and such. Who'd want that label placed on an innocent child?

    Hugs
    marlene
     
  7. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Soft clothing only, hates to change clothes, avoids any type of ceremonies, soft food only, obsessed with counting things? = Aspie.
     
  8. Tracy Rimmer

    Tracy Rimmer CF, Classroom & Books Mod Supporter

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    It certainly sounds like it may be autistic spectrum -- but the fact that you say he's on Ritalin also makes me stop and think. Has he always been like this, or did it start after the advent of that particular wonder-drug?

    Ritalin has some pretty extreme side effects in some children. I would say that if the doctors can't figure it out, then it's not Asperbergers, because they're ALL TOO eager to diagnose that one. Too often mistakenly. If the child has been on Ritalin since this began, and he's having physical issues that have also begun since taking Ritalin (the dragging of the foot), I would consider that.

    Is it possible that the parents know full well exactly what is going on and have chosen not to share it with you, or are in denial about the diagnosis? Some parents need some time to get used to a diagnosis of "Autistic Spectrum Disorder" -- they don't understand what "autistic spectrum" really is, and when their child doesn't "look" autistic they deny that that is what it is. Autistic spectrum covers a LOT of area, and Asperger's is only one part of it.
     
  9. manygoatsnmore

    manygoatsnmore Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Boy, it sure sounds like AS or ASD. Even the foot dragging part, as motor skills often suffer with this disorder. The fixating on one subject and only wanting to talk about that one thing is a red flag. Both of my AS kids do that. My oldest son definitely lives in his own world, really doesn't think about going for months or even years without getting in touch with us. Then he'll drop back in as though he'd never been gone, and doesn't understand that we may have actually been WORRIED about him!

    Also, ADHD, depression, often go along with the AS. Not uncommon for a kid to be on Ritalin or another stimulant med, and also be an Aspie.
     
  10. ceresone

    ceresone Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I thank you all for the help, it really seems to fit him better than any other diagnosis we've heard- yes, the parents share with us, they would like to have a correct diagnosis also. does this run in families? his mother says his father was like this also, was in the pen. twice, because what he wanted, he wanted NOW, didnt matter if it wasnt his, could never hold a job, etc.
    he definetly isnt dumb, he can explain the workings of something he has only seen once and looks at it a min. thanks again
     
  11. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Have you seen the movie "Rainman" w/ Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman??

    If not it may help you "see" what goes on for such folks.
     
  12. Bluegirl

    Bluegirl Well-Known Member

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    I am the mother of an autistic child. This boy does not fit the description of a child with autism. Imaginative creativity is more difficult than reality-based creativity in a person with autism. An autistic would re-tell a story they are already familiar with. An autistic child would not have an active fantasy life. An autistic child might memorize and recite the lines from a "space" movie. An autistic child would not pretend to be from another planet. The autistic child is very black & white. Reality. Facts. Literal. Very literal.
     
  13. Ardie/WI

    Ardie/WI Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There is such a broad spectrum of developmental disorders that it is sometimes difficult to pinpoint one. I feel that this little boy needs evaluation by someone who is familiar with those disorders. Sometimes it is amazing what a little counseling can do.
     
  14. mayfair

    mayfair a yard full of chickens

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    Sometimes teachers and pediaticians don't catch Asperger's because they have no experience and it does manifest in so many ways. Maybe an evaluation by a psychiatrist trained in recognizing ASD and AS is in order so they can rule it out or diagnose it.