ASI Weekly

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by bergere, Feb 4, 2005.

  1. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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    News for Sheep Industry Leader

    Writer/Editor: Judy Malone E-mail: judym@sheepusa.org

    Web sites: http://www.sheepusa.org AND http://www.americanwool.org

    Ferbuary 4, 2005

    Sheep Numbers Increase for First Time Since 1990
    U.S. Department of Agriculture Under Secretary Jim Butler delivered spectacular news to participants at the American Sheep Industry (ASI)/National Lamb Feeders Association Annual Convention last week, when he announced that the number of replacement lambs under one year of age had increased 10 percent over the last year. Butler provided this information from the newly published Sheep and Goats Report released by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS).

    As of Jan. 1, 2005, replacement lambs under one year increased from 702,000 in 2004 to 771,000 in 2005, an increase of 10 percent.

    “Reports of growth in sheep numbers is great news for the entire industry and hits a priority goal of ASI to strengthen our industry,” stated Peter Orwick, ASI executive director. “It is gratifying to see such positive results in the lamb and wool business helped in part by the nine different incentive programs that ASI has provided over the last four years, including the retained breeding ewe-lamb program.

    Confirmation of better times for the wool sector also was evident in the NASS report. Over the last 12 months, wool prices have improved. The average price paid for wool sold in 2004 was $0.80 per lb., up from $0.73 per lb. last year. The value of U.S. wool sold in 2004 increased 6 percent.

    "We are proud that our wool marketing programs implemented in 2001 have helped drive competitive pricing for U.S. wool,” added Orwick. “We have helped build a customer base in the United States, as well as internationally, with our wool being exported to a dozen countries around the world."

    Staff contact: Peter Orwick, ext. 33

    Enthusiasm for U.S. Sheep Industry’s Future
    There was great enthusiasm for the future of the U.S. sheep industry at the 2005 American Sheep Industry Association/National Lamb Feeders Association (NLFA) Annual Convention Jan. 26-29 in Reno, Nev. Registrations topped those seen in recent years, with attendance surpassing 360.

    “The industry definitely demonstrated a unified front with participation from five national sheep associations including ASI, NLFA, the American Lamb Board, the National Sheep Industry Improvement Center and the Western Range Association,” stated ASI Executive Director Peter Orwick. “Additionally, all major players in the domestic wool industry had a strong presence again at this year’s events, and everyone was pleased to hear U.S. production of lamb and wool would be increasing in 2005.”

    Dr. Jim Butler, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) deputy under secretary, and Dr. Ron DeHaven, USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service administrator, addressed attendees on topics ranging from the increase in sheep numbers and ewe-lamb payments to an update on animal health issues and trade policies.

    Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) representative, Ron Cole, conveyed that AMS began reporting wool on a clean basis by region rather than individual sales on a grease basis. This type of reporting provides the producer more complete information on wool values, encourages more companies to share information and is a more internationally accepted type of reporting.

    Major policy additions or amendments addressed by the board included:
    · an opposition to the United States reopening the Canadian border to sheep trade until the trade barriers concerning bluetongue and anaplasmosis are eliminated;

    · industry support of an effort to amend the Minor Use and Minor Species Animal Health Act of 2004 to include language that would provide federal tax incentives for the development and labeling of pharmaceuticals for sheep;

    · ASI assistance to USDA/APHIS in requiring all states to attain consistent state status for scrapie eradication; and

    · approval of an across-the-board membership dues increase for fiscal year 2006-2007.
    The board of directors also welcomed back into membership sheep producers from Iowa and Delaware.
    To read the full press release, go to: www.sheepusa.org

    ASI Executive Board Named
    New officers and executive board members were seated Jan. 29, 2005, during the American Sheep Industry (ASI)/National Lamb Feeders Association Annual Convention in Reno, Nev.

    The slate of officers includes: Paul Frischknecht, president, Manti, Utah; Burdell Johnson, vice president, Tuttle, N.D.; and Glen Fisher, secretary/treasurer, Sonora, Texas.

    Newly elected members to the executive board were Brant Miller, Bowdoinham, Maine, representing ASI’s Region I; Bill Sparrow, Jr., Durham, N.C., representing Region II; Jim Bristol, West Branch, Mich., representing Region III; and DA Harral, Fort Stockton, Texas, representing Region V.

    In addition to the new members, two regions re-confirmed appointments for existing members. Lyndon Irwin, Ph.D., was re-elected to serve as ASI’s Region IV representative and Richard Hamilton as the Region VIII representative.

    Members continuing their service on the board include Mark Marley, Roswell, N.M., Region VI, and Margaret Soulen-Hinson, Weiser, Idaho, Region VII.

    BOD Passes Dues Increase
    During the 2005 American Sheep Industry (ASI)/National Lamb Feeders Association Convention in Reno, Nev., last week, the ASI Board of Directors passed a membership dues increase that will take effect in fiscal year 2006-2007.

    The board agreed that in order for the national trade association to be sufficiently funded to carry on membership, legislative and communications services, planning and preparation needed to be conducted. Approval of the dues rate fully a year and a half in advance of the effective date provides sufficient lead-time for state members to plan for increased fund-raising.

    The dues structure to be implemented in fiscal year 2006-2007 provides for a 22-percent overall increase to ASI. The dues will increase by the following amounts: stock sheep from $0.03 per sheep to $0.035; member dues from $6 to $8 per member; and minimum state dues from $300 to $400.

    FSA Update
    County Farm Service Agency (FSA) offices are currently working with sheep producers on two important industry programs:

    1. As announced by U.S. Department of Agriculture Deputy Under Secretary, Jim Butler, producers who applied and were eligible for payment under the ewe-lamb replacement and retention program will be receiving the full $18 per-head payment. Applications were submitted by 16,217 producers on 824,572 lambs totaling $14.8 million. Payment processing began the last week of January and continued through the first week of February.

    2. Voting on the American Lamb Referendum is being conducted throughout the month of February. Documentation showing involvement in the industry in 2004 will be required for voting. Producers can download the voting form at: http://www.ams.usda.gov/lsg/mpb/lamb/referendumlb.htm

    Wool Trust Report Presented
    During the 2005 American Sheep Industry (ASI)/National Lamb Feeders Association Annual Convention in Reno, Nev., last week, the 2005 Wool Trust Report to Congress was presented to Dr. Jim Butler, U.S. Department of Agriculture’s deputy under secretary.

    The fourth year of programs under the Wool Trust has been completed. The trust continues to have a positive impact in the industry and is clearly helping to achieve the goal of a more competitive U.S. wool industry.

    ASI contracts with the Wool Trust Foundation to deliver key programs for the wool industry with an emphasis on industry communications, animal health and domestic and international wool programs. These wool-oriented, non-industry funds have been extended to ASI through 2008.

    Wolf Status In Question
    U.S. District Judge Robert E. Jones in Portland, Ore., on Monday ruled that U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) improperly separated the gray wolf into Distinct Population Segments.

    Monday’s decision by the federal court requires FWS to abandon its 2003 policy that created three regional recovery areas and requires the wolf to be recovered within most of its historic habitat at historic numbers before delisting can occur. With the wolf’s ‘endangered’ designation restored, rules allowing ranchers to harass or kill wolves have been eliminated.

    The FWS director’s office said it will take two to four weeks to review the decision and its implications. They did indicate that they will move forward and issue the guidance for the new 10j rules on wolves in Montana and Idaho, which allows increased flexibility for wolf management in these two states with approve wolf management plans.

    “It looks like it will be a longer period of time before we will have the authority to manage wolves,” said Gary Skiba, director, Colorado Division of Wildlife.

    Bonnie Kline, executive director of the Colorado Woolgrowers Association called the ruling a stab in the back. “Our willingness to work together and be proactive and work outside the box has just plummeted to zero because of this.”
     
  2. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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    Page 2

    Confirmed Case of BSE in a Goat
    According to an European Union (EU) press release, a suspected case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in a goat slaughtered in France in 2002 was confirmed late last week by a panel of European scientists.

    The European Commission proposes to step up testing to determine if this is an isolated incident. This is the first time that BSE has been found in a goat under natural conditions.

    The Commission is proposing increased testing for BSE among goats for at least six months or 200,000 tests of healthy goats in the EU, to determine if this is an isolated incident.

    Weekly National Market Prices for Wool
    The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s prices for wool the week beginning Feb. 2, 2005, can be accessed at http://www.fsa.usda.gov/pas/FullStory.asp?StoryID=2023.
     

  3. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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    Page 3

    * PRESS RELEASE * * PRESS RELEASE * * PRESS RELEASE *

    FEBRUARY 3, 2005

    ENTHUSIASM FOR U.S. SHEEP INDUSTRY’S FUTURE

    For More Information Contact:
    Judy Malone (303) 771-3500, ext. 35, or judym@sheepusa.org
    Amy Conner (303) 771-3500, ext. 55, or amy@sheepusa.org
    Peter Orwick (303) 771-3500, ext. 33 or porwick@sheepusa.org

    Denver, Colo. – There was great enthusiasm for the future of the U.S. sheep industry at the 2005 American Sheep Industry Association (ASI)/National Lamb Feeders Association (NLFA) Annual Convention Jan. 26-29 in Reno, Nev. Registrations topped those seen in recent years, with attendance surpassing 360.

    “The industry definitely demonstrated a unified front with participation from five national sheep associations including ASI, NLFA, the American Lamb Board, the National Sheep Industry Improvement Center and the Western Range Association,” stated ASI Executive Director Peter Orwick. “Additionally, all major players in the domestic wool industry had a strong presence again at this year’s events, and everyone was pleased to hear U.S. production of lamb and wool would be increasing in 2005.”

    The convention schedule was filled with workshops and presentations covering multiple aspects relevant to the industry. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Wildlife Services Agency presented a predator management workshop, which focused on the economics of predation management in relation to livestock and wildlife. Multiple studies demonstrate positive effects when a predator management plan is utilized. Results show predation rates in adult sheep decreased from 5.7 to 1.6 percent and from 17.5 to 6 percent in lambs.

    USDA Deputy Under Secretary, Dr. Jim Butler, congratulated the industry on its ability to increase sheep numbers for the first time since 1990. He also informed attendees that producers who applied and were eligible for payment under the ewe-lamb replacement and retention program would be receiving the full $18 per-head payment. Applications were made by 16,217 producers on 824,572 lambs totaling $14.8 million.

    Also addressing convention goers was USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Administrator, Dr. W. Ron DeHaven. He stressed the agencies commitment to the sheep industry by pledging long-term support to the scrapie eradication process and continued support for Veterinary Services and Wildlife Services programs. DeHaven provided an update on the intent of the agency to re-open the border between the United States and Canada. The results of the investigation by USDA’s technical team in Canada will provide guidance on the next steps to be taken.

    The American Lamb Board highlighted its promotional activities of the past year by sharing ad copy as well as segments of film footage promoting American lamb. Raising awareness of domestic lamb was a common thread throughout the campaign.

    Sheep leaders reviewed the progress on the ASI initiative to secure a Livestock Risk Protection program for the lamb industry. Discussion pursued as to the steps to be taken this winter to implement the program.

    Agricultural Research Service (ARS) representative, Ron Cole, conveyed that ARS began reporting wool on a clean basis by region rather than individual sales on a grease basis. This type of reporting provides the producer with more complete information on wool values, encourages more companies to share information and is a more internationally accepted type of reporting.

    Bob Padula, ASI’s wool quality improvement consultant, provided details about the implementation of two new quality improvement programs – the “Certified Clip” and “Certified Shearing.” The self-certifying shearing declaration provides a way to certify that wool will be shorn and prepared properly. The board was also pleased to see a wool/nomex flight suit. The suit was made of fire-retardant fabric and was developed by ASI with Natick for military use.

    For the second consecutive year, a panel of international sheep industry representatives provided insight into the industries of their respective countries. Mexico, Canada, Australia and New Zealand made available producer presenters to speak with participants about the issues affecting the sheep industry in their countries.

    Major policy additions or amendments addressed by the board included:

    · an opposition to the U.S. reopening the Canadian border to sheep trade until the trade barriers concerning bluetongue and anaplasmosis are eliminated;

    · industry support of an effort to amend the Minor Use and Minor Species Animal Health Act of 2004 to include language that would provide federal tax incentives for the development and labeling of pharmaceuticals for sheep;

    · ASI assistance to USDA/APHIS in requiring all states to attain consistent state status for scrapie eradication; and

    · approval of an across-the-board membership dues increase for fiscal year 2006-2007.

    The board of directors also welcomed back into membership sheep producers from Iowa and Delaware.

    The “Yes for American Lamb Coalition” was well represented during the convention with all sheep organizations participating in promoting approval of the American Lamb referendum during the month of February.

    Elected to the leadership role as ASI president was Paul Frischknecht from Manti, Utah. Burdell Johnson from Tuttle, N.D., moves into the vice president position while Sonora, Texas, sheep producer, Glen Fisher, was elected secretary/treasurer.

    New regional representatives on the board include: Brant Miller, Maine, Region I; Bill Sparrow, N.C., Region II; Jim Bristol, Mich., Region III; and DA Harral, Texas, Region V. Lyndon Irwin, Mo., and Richard Hamilton, Calif., were re-elected for second-terms to represent Regions IV and VIII, respectively.

    “Industry leaders have committed huge resources to incentives and national programs to grow the U.S. sheep business, so the announcement of the inventory report was very positively received,” added Orwick. “Conducting the meeting on the eve of the lamb referendum was also fortunate as leaders view the promotion of programs for increased lamb production a necessity.”

    ASI is a national trade organization supported by 42 state sheep associations, benefiting the interests of nearly 67,000 sheep producers.