Article- independant farmers/ranchers to disappear....

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by LMonty, Dec 13, 2006.

  1. LMonty

    LMonty Well-Known Member

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    Thought y'all might find this interesting, rest of the article at the link (other categories, thats allthere is on farmers...):

    10 Jobs That Will Fade by 2012
    By Kate Lorenz, CareerBuilder.com Editor
    While there are indications that the economy is swelling and many industries are projected to grow in the coming years, there are also signs that some occupations are becoming obsolete. The majority of the decreases are in office and administrative support and production occupations, which are affected by the implementation of office technology that reduces the needs for these workers, changes in business practices, and escalating plant and factory automation. A majority of the job openings occurring in these occupations will arise not from job growth, but from the need to replace those transferring to other industries, retire or leave for other reasons

    Here are some of the jobs expected to severely decline between now and 2012 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

    Farmers and Ranchers
    This dwindling occupation will see the largest decrease or all sectors, losing 250,000 jobs by 2012. The complexity of modern farming and keen competition among farmers leaves little room for the marginally successful farmer. Therefore, the long-term trend toward consolidation of farms into fewer and larger farms is expected to continue displacing small independent farmers.


    snip

    http://jobs.aol.com/article/_a/10-jobs-that-will-fade-by-2012/20050808184609990056
     
  2. montysky

    montysky Well-Known Member

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    Long time trend, but my famly has been ranching in Montana since 1860 , and in Germany and Sweden before that. I have no plans of stopping.
     

  3. unioncreek

    unioncreek Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think that you'll see mid sized farms decline and a slight increase in corp. farms. But, I also think you'll see a large increase in the number of small farms that will fill niche markets. The trend is already upward for those small farms that are 50 to 100 acres. Even in the east the number of dairies that have less than 50 cattle has gone up. I maybe wrong, but hopefully not.

    Montysky, where are you from? I grew up southeast of Billings, my Mom still owns our farm there.

    Bobg
     
  4. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    Nor do I. The large farms will need replacements. There will be a time when they will have trouble finding replacements, so the premiums for heifers will be high. Even with the low milk prices, replacement prices haven't dropped much at all. People are still spending top dollar for top animals. Even the small farm is still buying animals ever so often. I do think by 2010 and beyond things will change dramatically. However, remember this. The consumer is becoming more aware, and the consumer has the voice. The consumer wants beef and dairy products differently. They dont want "hormones" in their milk or meat. So the small farmer raising beef naturally, or milking naturally will benefit if they use their head. By marketing your beef or milk under the table will make you $$. It is amazing how many people want raw milk. We recently got our permit, and we could advertise. However what keeps us from doing it, is the fact we dont want too many people. People tell us we have the best raw milk they have tried. A local farm some have bought some from (who have their permit), but they said ours tastes better (probably due to the low SCC, and the diet). Either way, the small farmer will die, if the small farmer doesn't diversify. Those niche markets are the key to success, and you can do very well in those markets. The farmers markets around here have become very popular, because people can talk with the person who actually grew the product.


    Jeff
     
  5. hillsidedigger

    hillsidedigger Well-Known Member

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    As evidenced by this forum and others. I think the number of very small farms, 2 to 10 acres will continue to rise with many supplementing or completely earning their income from these very small farms.
     
  6. montysky

    montysky Well-Known Member

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    Bob, I am in Springhill about 10 miles from Bozeman, my grandmother's grandparents or greatgrandparent's Ranch. My grandfather's Famlily ranched in what was Straw Montana, Straw is long gone.
     
  7. unioncreek

    unioncreek Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Montysky,

    I spent 10 years in Bozeman (MSU) and know where Springhill is. My brother has a friend there (Brian Wright), I think that's his name. He owns Auqa Tech at Belgrade. I miss that area and hope to one day move back to the general area.

    Isn't Straw up around the Lewiston area, between Judith Gap and Eddy's Corner?
    Bobg
     
  8. montysky

    montysky Well-Known Member

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    It is a small world, yes I know the Wrights one of the first families into Springhill. to be Honest I don't know where straw is My grandfather's family left the Ranch when He was 14/15 his father died when he was 9. But he did move to Lewiston so maybe. The ranch in springhill is on my grandmother's side of the family.
     
  9. unioncreek

    unioncreek Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Montysky,

    There's still a sign for Straw just before Eddy's Corner the last time I was up that way. Yes, it's a small world.

    Bobg