Are my broccoli seedlings OK? (photos)

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Leah IL, Apr 7, 2005.

  1. Leah IL

    Leah IL momto6

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  2. Manny

    Manny Well-Known Member

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    Not enough light. These plants will not be suitable for transplanting outside. I would suggest that you purchase a cheap 4 foot fluorescent shop light, replant with new seeds and place the the new sprouts under the lights with about 2 inches of clearance. Keep the light on for about 16 hours a day.
     

  3. sylvar

    sylvar Well-Known Member

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    They will be ok if you get some more light on them. A window sill is not enough. I use a flourecent light 1 inch above the plants.

    Good Luck!

    Shane
     
  4. Leah IL

    Leah IL momto6

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    Thanks for your responses, Manny and Shane. On your advice, I went and bought a 4 foot fluorescent light and set it up over the plants, about 1-1 1/2" above. Manny, I know you said they are no good, but I am going to try to salvage them. If it doesn't work, I'll deal with it I guess. Do you think the plants on the side, not directly under the light, will be alright? And what about plants that haven't sprouted yet? I have some flats of tomatoes that I just planted a day or so ago. Should they be under light also, or not until they show?

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/lkh314/IMG_0726.jpg

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/lkh314/IMG_0729.jpg

    Thanks for answering my dumb questions!
     
  5. sylvar

    sylvar Well-Known Member

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    I'd go ahead and put the tomatoes under the lights. The heat will help them sprout.

    I really do think your broccoli will be ok. They aren't totally twisted, just a little lopsided. They are young enough that they should straighten up.

    Shane
     
  6. bethlaf

    bethlaf Homegrown Family

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    keep the light low till the plants are trying to grow up past it , and the broccoli should be fine, personally i keep my grow light on 24 7 for my seedlings
    mine are out in the garden now, and the only ones i "lost" were the ones the chickens found and denuded
     
  7. Leah IL

    Leah IL momto6

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    An amazing recovery!! Wow, you guys were exactly right! Already, after only 3 hours, they are starting to straighten toward the light. Plus- and this might just be a coincidence- my celery and parsley started to come up as well. Up until today I thought they were both lost causes due to bad seed, but there they are. And my dill looks as though it is growing before my eyes :) I never knew it was necessary for such direct light. Thanks so much, everyone!
     
  8. Manny

    Manny Well-Known Member

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    If you plant those long stemmed plants outside when they have more leaves on them any wind at all will whip those long stems and you will wind up with a number of broken plants. If you really want to save them, new ones planted would only be a week or so behind, you could try planting them deeper than they are growing now, all the way up to the first set of leaves. Some veggies tolerate this and some do not but I would still suggest starting anew.
     
  9. Leah IL

    Leah IL momto6

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    Ok, you have convinced me :) It was the wind comment- we get some unbelievable wind out here. I guess I won't be too far behind, will I? I am borderline zone 5/6, so I think it will be ok. My brussels sprouts and collards were really tall like the broccoli, so I re-started those also.

    One more question, if you don't mind. Does the light need to be directly on all of the seedlings all the time? I am thinking that when I put another flat or 2 on the table, I won't be able to have them all under 1 light. Can I just rotate them, or do I need to go buy another light?

    Thanks a lot.
     
  10. mammabooh

    mammabooh Metal melter Supporter

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    I've been known to tape aluminum foil to the sides of my light...long enough pieces to reach past the trays. That seems to keep the light in there better. I also do lots of rotating. I normally do 16 hours with light, 8 dark.

    Also, I don't know if anyone else suggested it, but after looking at your set-up, I'd suggest that you put your light down much closer to the plants.
     
  11. Leah IL

    Leah IL momto6

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    Ok, I'll do that too, thanks. And I'll experiment with the foil as well. Maybe I'll buy another light, it was only $7.00 at Menards. I just hate spending MONEY :)
     
  12. Manny

    Manny Well-Known Member

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    If you have as many seedlings as I think you have it would be best to get another light. A rotation scheme is just too much work compared to another $7.00. Another thing I would suggest is that you don't keep your sprouted seeds at too high a temperature, around 55 to 65 degrees is good, and try to water from the bottom to prevent the "damping -off" disease.
     
  13. Leah IL

    Leah IL momto6

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    What is watering from the bottom? Putting water in the tray underneath the plants?
     
  14. Manny

    Manny Well-Known Member

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    I assume the containers that your seedlings are in have drainage holes in their bottoms. When you water from the bottom you have a tray that you set your growing containers in and put water in that tray. The growing medium that your seedlings are planted in will suck up the water by capillary action and will only take up whatever moisture it needs or you can remove the containers just when you see the surface of the mix just starting to get wet.
     
  15. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thinking about what Manny said, I'm wondering what would happen if you transplanted the seedlings once before you set them out? There's still a month or so in Zone 5 before the coles and brassicas go out. You could put them in deeper soil, up to the lowest leaves. I've done this with moderate success on leggy plants.

    Good luck!

    Pony!


    Just noticed you're growing in peat pots. So, as for watering, just make sure the pots don't dry out. But don't drown them, either. I always wait until the top edge of the peat pot looks dry, then I water from the bottom. (Some splashes on the top, oh well... <G>)
     
  16. TabletopHomestead

    TabletopHomestead Well-Known Member

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    I've had no luck with cole crops started in the house. My mom says too warm and not enough light. This year I started them in the greenhouse and now have beautiful cabbage and broccoli in the garden. I think without a greenhouse I'd try using a cold frame outdoors.