Are Llamas as good at protecting as Donkeys?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by TimandPatti, Jun 19, 2005.

  1. TimandPatti

    TimandPatti Texas

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    I have raised donkeys, so I know what they will do to a coyote. I hear Llama's are as good. My question is, anyone have Llamas that could tell me for sure. Since we moved, I can't find a donkey. :(
     
  2. BamaSuzy

    BamaSuzy Well-Known Member

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    One of my best friends just sold their donkey this week planning to buy a llama because coyotes were still killing his lambs....
     

  3. 65284

    65284 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This probably won’t be a popular opinion since it contradicts some widely held beliefs. One large llama may deter one small predator. Think about it, what can a llama really do? They don't have hooves just small pads with nails, the males do have moderate sized canines, but they don't stand much of a chance against several or even one large aggressive dog, bear, or cat. I know of several instances where feral dogs or coyotes have killed llamas. Donkeys are somewhat better but again unless they are specially trained and bonded with whatever they are supposed to guard they are not very efficient. A lot of them are problems themselves, chasing sheep/goats, and killing lambs. Against a pack of dogs or coyotes most donkeys will simply turn tail and run. The best solution I have found is 2 or 3 LGD, although they also have drawbacks/problems. I have raised donkeys, llamas, and Great Pyrs for many years. I suspect you will get testimonials swearing how great they are from the donkey and llama factions here, but in my experience neither is very effective.
     
  4. GrannieD

    GrannieD Well-Known Member

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    AMEN ~ Its like other things "the book says"....My donkeys are not for protection,but will make life uncomfortable for a dog when they want to, but I don't think it is to protect anything & they will go their way when a dog gets tough back...plus how busy they'd be keeping watch all 24 hours for coyotes on 250 acres...GrannieD
     
  5. brosil

    brosil Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Our llama seemed to be a good shepherd for 4 yrs and this year started killing our ewes by raping them. He's gone now and he won't be coming back. I'll take my chances with the coyotes.
     
  6. Misty

    Misty Misty Gonzales

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    Our Llama also was raping goats....no one I had talked to ever heard of that before. My fave gaurdians are my two anatolian/pyr/akbash male dogs. I love them. They will kill, but are gentle natured enough to have around my kids. They let the baby goats play all over them. I love those dogs.
     
  7. Gary in ohio

    Gary in ohio Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A gelded male is a nice protection for sheep, goats and smaller animals, but llama's and horses dont get along very well. Not sure about llama's and donkeyes.
     
  8. whodunit

    whodunit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Some donkeys just arent interested in protecting IMO, others just love to do it. I had a donkey that ANYTHING that didnt belong in the pasture that got run/stompt out. Needless to say my grandmother wasnt impressed LOL went she went for a walk when we werent home. Even tresspassers got run out by him. Coyotes never came near while we had him. The other donkeys depended on him for protection. he was not trained.

    I just dont think all donkeys have it in them to protect.
     
  9. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think the personality of the donkey has to be taken into consideration. If he or she considers himself to be lower ranking than the ram, he will expect the ram to protect the flock. If you have a flock or herd, notice that when there is danger, they take up positions. Mothers and small children will be in the inner circle, or kept closest to safety. Adult males and more dominant females will face the intruder. I have no doubt that my jennets would protect the sheep because of the way they interact with them, llike a subset of the larger set, and the way they set themselves up when they suspect danger.