Are CL & CAE contagious to dogs?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by WolfSoul, Oct 13, 2004.

  1. WolfSoul

    WolfSoul Well-Known Member

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    I have Service Dogs and Service Puppies in training on my property. Can they get CL and CAE from goats?

    I've been reading all of the info being posted, but I don't think this issue was addressed.

    Thanks,
    Karen
     
  2. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    CAE is a non-issue to other animals. There was some talk about the CAE virus being used to stimulate immunity to HIV and AIDS in humans, but I don't think it ever got past the conjecture stage. There is also talk that a positive sheep for 0PP can be CAE positive from goats, and vice versa.

    CL is labeled zoonic, so this means all mammals. You would have to look up to find out how cornybacterium effects dogs to even know the name of the disease in them, if they where or do get this. Like in goats it's called Caseous (cheese) lympanditis (inflamation of the lymph nodes), the bacteria that causes the lumps themselves is the corny.... Vicki
     

  3. WolfSoul

    WolfSoul Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, Vicki for replying. Now I'm scratching my head. The neighbor's goats with which I've had so much trouble, were let out last Saturday to graze (I called the Sheriff.) They came across the yards and were grazing in the front strip of lawn just outside my chainlink fence. That means my puppy was nose to nose with them, and the goats use my chain link fence to scratch all along. Ok, that probably didn't make sense.

    I have fenced off about an acre with chain link to make a nice yard around the house for humans and dogs to play in. The pasture is to the side and back. However, when the neighbors saw me putting up a chain link fence to enclose the front yard, he decided to use OUR FENCE as one side of his livestock fence and extend his pasture to include his front lawn area. Did that make sense?

    So now, his goats use our chain link fence as a daily scratching fence almost buckling it in. some goats have sores on their shoulders, one had a lump the size of a baseball (no kidding) and my puppy runs over to greet them nose to nose. Between the exposure to the front fence when they're loose and the DAILY rubbing on our fence and nose to nose exposure can that transmit CL to my pup who then carries it to the other side of the yard where he is nose to nose with my dairy herd (no laughing all you old timers, I'm new at this :haha: )

    If so, do you or anyone else know how to get my dogs tested for CL? My older dog has had two growths on her head that were round and she itched at them like crazy. She never had them before. Being that they are service dogs, this is a HUGE problem as it means my dogs, if they have it, can not go in public!

    Any help in answering this would be appreciated. Karen

    The more I read about disease transmission, the P-offed I am at my neighbors and their lack of responsibility. :mad:

     
  4. AnnaS

    AnnaS Well-Known Member

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    Looking through my Merck's Vet Manual... :)
    Since CL is caused by a bacteria, it will affect lots of different species but in different ways. CAE is caused by a virus, which are usually species specific and won't survive in the wrong host.

    The bacteria that causes CL, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, can cause pyoderma in dogs. This is a skin infection that will cause pus-filled blisters; round, ringworm like lesions; hair loss, fever, loss of appetite. You didn't say what breed your service dog is, but the breeds most likely to get pyoderma are GSDs, Labs and Goldens. I bet your critters are one of those.

    BUT there are also a bunch of other bacterium that will cause this, along with allergies and endocrine/metabolic/immune problems, which those 3 breeds also get a lot. It would be really hard to prove that any infection a dog got had originated with those icky goats. One step would be to have your vet culture the sores on your dog's head (if they are still there) to find out exactly what is causing that.
     
  5. MaKettle

    MaKettle Well-Known Member

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    Is your chain link right on the boundry line between the two properties? If you set it inside your boundry line, then is he trespassing by letting his goats use your fence? You might need to run a hot wire along the fence to keep your animals out of harm's way.