Are Cashmere goats aggressive?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by AndreaR, Feb 10, 2005.

  1. AndreaR

    AndreaR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    57
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2003
    Location:
    Alberta, Canada
    I was looking to add a couple of cashmere goats to my growing flock of 5 shetlands, 2 Jacobs and was told I should not have the cashmeres with young children around. The goats are said to be aggressive more than the angora, and the wide horns could hurt my children(ages 5, 10, 10, 11). Any one have cashmeres and children safely on the same farm? Are cashmere goats easy to look after? Do they kid easily? Any help with this would be great...I would love to have the cashmere for my handspinning and knitting hobby.
     
  2. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,832
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    Location:
    Washington
    I've never had angoras to compare my cashmeres to, but my cashmeres aren't agressive at all. The wide horns can be a bit much, but they've never gotten me intentionally. My goats are just fine with my niece and nephews (4,6, and 12) - I'm in there to supervise but I've never seen anything worrisome.

    The only health problems I've noticed with the cashmeres is that they tend to have soft hooves - if you have soggy ground that's something to keep on top of. The soft hooves don't seem to bother the goats at all, and it does make it easy to trim their nails. It does bother me so I check their feet weekly when it gets soggy here. Copper deficiency also causes weak and soft hooves, so in a breed already prone to that you really do have to watch that they get enough copper - that might be hard to do with your sheep. I have to bolus my goats to get them copper - the sheep got into any mineral arrangement I could dream up and I just couldn't slip enough copper into treats for them.

    My doe had no problems kidding. She never did have twins, but I think that was just her and not a breed trait.

    One thing to think about is that the goats will get bossy with your sheep. My cheviots give as good as they get now, but at first the goats were definitely bullies.

    My cashmeres are as easy to care for as any other goat, or sheep for that matter. With your sheep you already know that burrs and bedding can really cause headaches when you're trying to spin or sell the fiber.

    The cashmere, as I'm sure you already know, is just wonderful. One thing that is nice is that cashmeres don't have to be sheared. You can brush the undercoat out as they shed it in the spring and not worry about de-hairing the down before you card and spin it. Brushing them does mean keeping them very tame, but then you get to run your fingers through that wonderful coat all the time! :) They are sooooo soft.
     

  3. AndreaR

    AndreaR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    57
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2003
    Location:
    Alberta, Canada
    Jen, this is the first time I have had a positive report on the cashmeres. I am looking to visit a farm that sells their cashmere fiber and find out how their animals are. I may be convinced quite well as the lady says hers are not aggressive either. She gets rid of any that show aggressiveness...in the freezer they go!

    Thanks for the input..much appreciated.

    Andrea