Are all dog foods created equal?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by dot, Dec 2, 2004.

  1. dot

    dot Well-Known Member

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    Checking on bags of dog food at Wal Mart the Ol' Roy brand lists the same ingredients with the same percents as the Puppy Chow brand. Is one just as good as the other? What brand do you feed your dog?
     
  2. second_noah

    second_noah Local Yokel

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    I use Purina feeds for my animals. I guess it's just personal preference, but I've just seen too many dogs that looked sickly after being fed Ol'Roy and other cheaper foods. Course they had other problems too, so I can't say that was THE cause of sickness, but I don't think it helped in recovery. I think Purina and some of the other mid range priced feeds use 'better quality' ingredients, most all dog foods do have pretty much the same stuff in them. The Iams and Eukanuba 15$ for a 9 lb bag foods are pricey but I think for a sick animal they have their place.

    Anyways, just my two cents! :)

    ~Christina
     

  3. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    Between all the regular commercial brands, there isn't too much of a difference-in some ways. usually pricier foods have higher quality ingredients- thus typically more absorbable, but this isn't law or anything. I think Ol Roy is probably the worse thing out there. :rolleyes:

    What you should look for in dog food:

    No by-products

    It should have 2 meat ingredients in the first four ingredients, and meat should be the first ingredient.

    No Corn

    Above are things most people "into" dog food will agree on I think. Maybe not the corn. Corn in dog food typically contains the husk too.

    Personally I think the food should be human grade due to the Pentobarbital (euthanizing & anesthetizing chemical) being in dog and cat foods. When livestock has to be put down, they use pentobarbitol. They can't use this meat for people, so it goes into the trashcan that is pet food (you do some research, you will find that is exactly what it is). They tested the effects of the low levels of pentobarbitol on dogs for 8 whole weeks before saying it was safe. I believe most dogs eat food for years. :rolleyes: In amounts a little higher than what is found in pet foods, it gave dogs enlarged livers.

    Also, I think minerals should be chelated, this makes them more absorbable.

    I also think a dog should be fed a food that is cooked with extrusion if possible, but that just about narrows things down to the food I sell. Extrusion is a very fast hot pressurized cooking method.

    Whatever you do, stay away from the "vegan" dog food. :no:

    I got into all this about 2 years ago, learning about pet food because I was worried about my beloved dog who is getting older. I wish she could have been fed good food earlier, but at least now she is eating good stuff. :)

    _____________
    "Chicken Byproducts Meal:
    Consists of the ground, rendered, clean parts of the carcass of slaughtered chicken, such as necks, feet, undeveloped eggs and intestines, exclusive of feathers, except in such amounts as might occur unavoidable in good processing practice.


    There is nothing inherently wrong with a little organ meat, it just shouldn't be the only meat source.

    Meat By-Product:
    Clean, non-rendered parts other than meat of slaughtered mammals. This can include lungs, kidneys, brain, spleen, liver, bone, blood, stomach, and intestines freed of their contents. It does not include hair, teeth, hooves or horns.

    Digest of Beef - material from beef which results from chemical and/or enzymatic hydrolysis of clean and undecomposed tissue. The tissues used shall be exclusive of hair, horns, teeth and hooves, except in such trace amounts as might occur unavoidably in good factory practice.

    Digest of Beef By-Products - material from beef which results from chemical and/or enzymatic hydrolysis of clean and undecomposed tissue from non-rendered clean parts, other than meat, from cattle which includes, but is not limited to, lungs, spleen, kidneys, brain, livers, blood, bone, partially defated low-temperature fatty tissue, and stomachs and intestines freed of their contents. It does not include hair, horns, teeth and hoofs.

    Digest of Poultry By-Products - material which results from chemical and/or enzymatic hydrolysis of clean and undecomposed tissue from non-rendered clean parts of carcasses of slaughtered poultry such as heads, feet, viscera, free from fecal content and foreign matter except in such trace amounts as might occur unavoidably in good factory practice.

    Dried Animal Digest - dried material resulting from chemical and/or enzymatic hydrolysis of clean and undecomposed animal tissue. The animal tissue used shall be exclusive of hair, horns, teeth, hooves and feathers, except in such trace amounts as might occur unavoidably in good factory practice and shall be suitable for animal feed. If it bears a name descriptive of its kind or flavor(s), it must correspond thereto.
     
  4. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've never heard a single good thing about Ol' Roy dog food. Last two Border Collie puppies I adopted were being fed Ol' Roy and were on meds for diarrhea. My dad (he has one of the pups) was upset about the Ol' Roy...said it was the worst thing you could feed a dog. We changed their food, stopped the meds and no more diarrhea.

    My husband, when he's in a tightwad phase, will look at Ol' Roy sometimes and I tell him to keep on moving. We feed our dogs Co-op dog food mixed with a more expensive brand and they are doing great.
     
  5. MARYDVM

    MARYDVM Well-Known Member

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    Only the occasional horse is put down with pentobarbitol, most livestock - cattle, pigs, sheep etc. are not killed by chemical means.

    Read the Ol Roy label again. Unless their formulation has changed, it contains "animal digest". This is the original mystery meat. It can contain ANY rendered animal, including road kill, or euthanized pets.
     
  6. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    Pentobarbital is in many brands of dog food, they've proven that.
     
  7. MARYDVM

    MARYDVM Well-Known Member

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    Pentobarbitol has been found in some batches of dog foods, but that doesn't change the fact that it is not used to kill livestock. It's primary use in animals is for the euthanasia of pets, and occasionally, horses.
     
  8. longshadowfarms

    longshadowfarms Well-Known Member

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    Ask your vet. I'm no feed expert but often you get what you pay for. As Southerngurl mentioned, better feeds are more absorbable. What that means long term is less bulk, you feed less and the dog poops less. We feed Diamond feed which is excellent according to our vet and every other vet that I've talked to about the issue. It isn't as high priced as the Iams or Eukanuba because they don't advertise as heavily if at all. Personally, I think the quality of the Diamond is better after doing careful comparisons. Diamond looks and smells better too for what that is worth. A number of breeders that I have encountered use it because of the lower cost/excellent quality. Our labs have reached 12, 14 and one is currently 12.5 years of age, all retaining excellent health throughout their lives. My BIL's dog is the fussiest eater on the planet and won't eat dry food unless it is Diamond. I am feeding lamb & rice (two of four dogs with allergies) forumula which runs $20/40 lb. Other forumulas will probably be less expensive since lamb and rice seems to be consistently most expensive.
     
  9. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    Brands positive for Pentobarbital
    http://www.fda.gov/CVM/efoi/dfchart.htm

    Looks like Purina's formulas are pretty clear.

    http://www.nutroproducts.com/reportinfo.asp

    "You may be asked how Nutro's Premium could contain even this minute level. To answer this you should first know that pentobarbital is routinely used by veterinarians to humanly euthanize injured farm livestock, like cows with broken legs. These cows are then rendered with other cows. Since Premium is a beef-based product, it is possible that some cross-contamination in rendering plants occurred. Second, you should point out that Premium did not appear on CVM's second, more recent, list. "


    http://64.233.179.104/search?q=cach....gov/poison.pdf+pentobarbital+livestock&hl=en
    "Most incidents of secondary poisoning (excluding accidental feeding of tainted meat tozoo animals) have been caused by both intentional and unintentional failure to properlydispose of a pentobarbital-tainted carcass, leaving it exposed in the environment andavailable to animal scavengers.There are many instances in which euthanized largeanimals including sheep, goats, pigs, horses, mules and cows, have been left out in thefield to be scavenged."
     
  10. mammabooh

    mammabooh Metal melter Supporter

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    We feed our miniature pinscher Iams. We tried the Walmart junk ONCE and she pooped three times as much as normal. It was just gross.
     
  11. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ...................Iams , is , very hi quality dog food . Both meal and Meat are what I feed my Akita and the vet said he will probably live longer because of it , ..fordy... :)
     
  12. 2horses

    2horses I'm a silly filly!! Supporter

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    You can actually starve a dog to death by feeding some of the cheaper brands of dog foods. I tried the PetsMart "house" brand once with my Pyrs (forgot the name - Advantage, maybe?), and that was a huge mistake. I don't have any personal experience with Ol' Roy, but mainly because I've never even entertained the thought of using it. I had my doberman on regular Purina Dog Chow (Lamb and Rice), and noticed that he seemed okay, but not optimal - coat and weight wise. Then I switched to Pro Plan, and he really picked up. So even the cheapest Purina feed has some deficiencies, in my opinion. Of course Pro Plan has a bit more fat in it, too, I realize, but I know I have one happy, healthy doberman now....

    Just my 2 cents worth....

    Pam :cool:
     
  13. Corgitails

    Corgitails Well-Known Member

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    Pro Plan is excellent- Southerngirl's Flint River Ranch is AWeSOME.

    Dogs do eat less of a premium quality food, sicne it's more digestable,
    so you CAN save money that way.

    Ole Roy and Puppy Chow / Dog Chow are JUNK. I would not feed them to
    ANYTHING. Stepping up one level- just to the Walmart premium brand Maximum
    Nutrition, or Purina One - is a BIG plus.
     
  14. Laura

    Laura Well-Known Member

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    The last time the dog food discussion came up, some even suggested that you shouldn't feed your dog anything you wouldn't eat. The "no corn" point of view was also expressed along with "the dog poops too much." I would like to remind you all that just as bran and bulk is good for our colon health, it is also good for your dogs.

    I was feeding my dogs Eukanuba and Iams at the time but I decided to follow my farm dogs around and see what else they ate.

    They ate a lot of cracked corn, even pushing the horse out of the way to eat it.

    All of the dogs ate alfalfa pellets, spilled rabbit food and chicken food, too. They ate cob, but only after everything else was cleaned up.

    The dogs found chicken poop especially tasty. All of them scouted the yard with their nose to the ground lapping up evey little pile.

    All of them ate turkey and chicken feathers. Supposedly there is some protein in feathers, but is supposed to be unavailabe protein. It does cause a lot of bulk.

    They liked aged brain, well ripened guts of anything, green meat and crunchy feet. It didn't matter if was road toad, skunk or coyote, it is good stuff!

    I concluded the notion to only feed my dogs food I would eat was total BS because I was not going to take their road toads and chicken heads away from them and I wasn't going to start eating chicken poop because there was no way to make them give that up. I concluded my dogs liked the bulk of corn, grains and "fillers" as they chose these over the full bowls of expensive dog food that was always out for them.

    I concluded the expensive brands of dog food were not cost effective for my dogs who preferred grains, fillers, and rancid carcasses.

    I now feed them a mid priced high protein dog food with fillers and they eat half the amount they did with the expensive stuff. While they still like the taste of chicken poop and get excited about something dead, the are no longer pushing the livestock out of the way to eat corn and cob. Their feather intake seems to have dropped off, too/
     
  15. Jane in southwest WI

    Jane in southwest WI Well-Known Member

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  16. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My dogs also like crunchy snacks (soft creamy filling) from the cats' litterbox and horse poop. :haha:
     
  17. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Heh... Buster the Dog likes Gritty Kitty Casserole, too...

    But I feed him Iams Senior for weight maintenance. The cats get Bench and Field, which also makes a very good dog food -- not as expensive as Iams, but still good quality, less clean up in the yard.
     
  18. januaries

    januaries Well-Known Member

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    We don't have a wide variety around here to choose from... I feed my GSD Iams.
     
  19. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    Dogs are not meant to fill up on things like corn. They are meant to eat meat, with some other things added to it the main part of their diet should be meat. Dogs do not require as much bulk and fiber as humans. Just like humans do not need the kind food a cow eats. Dogs are not humans, humans are not dogs. Dogs eat meat, they will also supplement that with some grians and vegetable matter from prey, grasses, and poo - especially from young animals currently on mama's milk. Poo from calfs ect. have lots of probiotics (not to mention unabsorbed nutrtion from milk), these are beneficial to dogs, and that is why they crave it. They also eat a little chicken poo for the same reasons. Yes, dogs will eat a few feathers.

    Problems arise when we try to feed the dogs a food that is based in foods they should eat here and there.

    If all you tried to make most of your diet consist of a mineral supplement and apples, it would not be optimum, yet both of these are good for you, they just aren't what you are supposed to base your diet on.
     
  20. ozarksnick

    ozarksnick Don't Tread On Me!

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    I am owned by a beagle. The best food that I've ever used is made by Diamond. I feed a high energy mix made especially for hunting dogs, but they make regular mixes too.

    A good majority of the other beaglers that I know also like Diamond, in fact that's how I initially found out about them.

    Diamond is also very inexpensive, the last 50 pound bag I bought cost about $13 from Orsheln's.