appomattox va

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by stumpyacres, Oct 8, 2004.

  1. stumpyacres

    stumpyacres Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    548
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    va
    I called in a bill - to pay it and could not believe that the lady on the other end never heard of it...have you? It is real important to US history. :confused:
     
  2. vegascowgirl

    vegascowgirl Try Me

    Messages:
    1,083
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2004
    Location:
    somewhere, and No where
    Civil War :The South surrendered to the North. and the war was over (although there were small battles fought afterward by companies who had not yet heard the news)
     

  3. Siryet

    Siryet In Remembrance

    Messages:
    847
    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2002
    Location:
    River Valley, Arkansas
    Walk the old country lanes where Robert E. Lee, Commanding General of the Army of Northern Virginia, surrendered his men to Ulysses Grant, General-in-Chief of all United States forces, on April 9, 1865. Imagine the events that signaled the end of the Southern States' attempt to create a separate nation. The National Park encompasses approximately 1800 acres of rolling hills in rural central Virginia. The site includes the McLean home (surrender site) and the village of Appomattox Court House, Virginia, the former county seat for Appomattox County. The site also has the home and burial place of Joel Sweeney - the popularizer of the modern five string banjo. There are twenty seven original 19th century structures on the site.

    I understand a group of people are trying downplay all that was civil war cause it's racist. maybe the true story isn't taught in schools any more. You understand don't ya? It's politically incorrect.​
    :no:
     
  4. breezynosacek

    breezynosacek Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    223
    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2003
    Location:
    VA
    Maybe they ran out of room in their history books to teach that in school???

    Or maybe the woman didn't understand English? :haha:
     
  5. stumpyacres

    stumpyacres Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    548
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    va
    so it is incorrect to talk about a war that happened - OVER money - money was the real issue...and if we don't talk - how do we understand???
     
  6. Shygal

    Shygal Unreality star Supporter

    Messages:
    9,894
    Joined:
    May 26, 2003
    Location:
    New York
    It's true, unfortunately. The schools dont teach much about it nowadays because its all racist :rolleyes:
    Just like banning the Confederate flag , because that is a symbol of racism, so they say.

    The Confederate flag doesn't stand for slavery, it stands for the people that were willing to sacrifice everything for what they believed in, and to ridicule it, or to ban it , or to pretend it never existed , is a terrible shame.
     
  7. syringaweb

    syringaweb Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    102
    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2003
    Location:
    Virginia
    I've read about the mutual respect that Lee and Grant had for one another. The mood in the parlor when they signed their names to the end of the war, it makes me shiver.

    To think of the extreme views and opinions that both gentlemen represented....

    Our current national candidates, and the extremist voters on either side could take a deep breath and learn a lot from this one historical day.
     
  8. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,977
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2002
    Location:
    East TN
    Currently in HS a standardized test to pass is not required in US history. They're spending sooo much time getting them to pass the very minimal in math and english they don't have time for history.
     
  9. Nomad

    Nomad Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    4,212
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2002
    Location:
    Northeast Ohio
    Anyone who ever had a thought to the character or strength of conviction of Southern soldiers has only to go to Gettysburg and stand near the Virginia Monument. Look out at the mile long uphill stretch of land those brave men marched across into almost certain death on that hot afternoon July 3, 1863. I don't consider myself a coward, but I can't concieve of what those men were made of that they could make such a charge. I have read many books on Gettysburg, but to see it in person was humbling. I am not ashamed to say that I was moved to tears more than once by things I saw. There were many heroes on both sides and if anyone has even a slight interest in the Civil War, Gettysburg is a must. There are over 1300 monuments and markers in the area. The scope of the three day battle covers a very large area. Mrs Nomad has even developed a large interest. She says her hero is Chamberlain of the 20th Maine. Sorry, I guess I got carried away. I have had an interest the Civil War for a few years, but since visiting Gettysburg it is my consuming passion. We'll be going back again next month. I would love to become a licensed guide, but I've still got a lot to learn. If anyone has knowledge of how I can find a battle flag of the 53rd Virginia I would appreciate it.

    Nomad
     
  10. deberosa

    deberosa SW Virginia Gourd Farmer!

    Messages:
    569
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2003
    Location:
    Floyd County, VA
    Yes, I have been to Gettysburg many times and even as a kid it was amazing to me. In high school I even organized a trip for my class to go there. I hope you got to see the Cyclorama (if it's still there!!!). It's the one presentation worth every penny to get in. Been to Appomatox, Manasass (both battles there) and many other civil war battlefields. All of them were very impressive. The shock at the first battle when the ladies went out to view the fight and their shock at it's actual brutality. They thought that war would only last for one battle and be over. (What is it about history repeating itself.)

    The field of Picket's charge - as you say it's inconceivable the strength of conviction it would take to march across that field into a hail of lead balls, knowing that one small wound would probably spell death or severe disability due to the poor medical knowledge at the time.

    What also impresses me is the comparison of current war death statistics with past wars. Thinking the war in Iraq is not as bad as the Civil war because there are not as many deaths. Consider that the survival rate of wounds was a tiny fraction back in Civil War times, it makes the size of these two events much closer when counting those not only killed, but wounded.
     
  11. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    24,572
    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2004
    Location:
    MS
    My son got to participate in the 135th anniversary re-enactment at Gettysburg. He said it was a most humbling experience to stand ready to take part in Picket's Charge and see men lined up on each side as far as one could see...and there were only a fraction of re-enactors participating that day to represent those soldiers. It was an experience that my son will always remember and I am grateful that he was able to participate. He was a re-enactor from age nine to age 16 with the 16th Alabama.
     
  12. Nomad

    Nomad Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    4,212
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2002
    Location:
    Northeast Ohio
    There were too many things to see in one short trip. We did the two hour CD self driving tour. After 5 hours we had to stop to go to the bathroom and eat, and there was still a lot more to see. I guess It takes two hours if you don't get out and walk around. Our next trip will give us three full days to look at much more places. We got there too late in the evening to see the cyclorama and then did the tour the next day and had to miss it. We hope to see it this time. The one thing that amazes me the most is that there was only one civialian casualty considering there was fighting right in the town. If poor Jennie Wade had stayed in the basement instead of baking bread for the soldiers, there probably wouldn't have been any. We saw her sister's house where it happened but didn't go in. It's a nice historical landmark but loses something with the Holiday Inn right next door. Oh well, progress. At least there are people trying to put the battlefields back to pretty much the way they looked then. I saw a large area where trees had recently been cut. There are places where it's hard to imagine the scene because it looks so different now. They will slowly get it all restored. I'm sure I'll be long gone by the time it's finished, but the battlefields of Gettysburg will live on forever whether they teach anything about the war in schools or not. Guess I'd better quit now. I tend to go on and on.

    Nomad
     
  13. deberosa

    deberosa SW Virginia Gourd Farmer!

    Messages:
    569
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2003
    Location:
    Floyd County, VA
    The cyclorama is an oil painting built in a circle 359 feet in circumference and 27 feet high. It depicts Pickets charge and was painted in 1884 from pictures of the battlefield by a French painter. You stand in the middle of the circle and it's like you are standing in the middle of the battle. There is a show that then points out all of the details of the painting and compares them with today's landscape etc. but you can spend as much time as you want looking at it before and after the show. I remember the painter painted himself leaning against a tree as a way of signing it! I put Gettysburg cyclorama in google and it came up and is still open! I last saw it in 1973.

    If you are going next month that would be a great time to see it because even back in the 70's this was a very crowded place in the tourist season, would be difficult to even get near it.