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Discussion Starter #1
I am sorry, but I posted this message the other day. or a part of it and I did not think that it got posted and I found it. I comment was made about cedar trees. Yes, there are lots of cedar trees in the area and the apples are ill formed. We have also had lots of rain. I am sorry that I did double up on the post but have not been on here for a while. Will try to do better. Thanks again
braggscowboy
 

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Sounds like too much rain and not enough warmth and sunshine. But that is just MHO. Have you had a wet, cool year where you are?

Tracy
 

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It sounds kind of like your apples have scab, from the description. Your malformed apples - do they have brown scabby looking spots, and look like they're puckered in at those spots? Another possibility is rust, but that usually doesn't malform the fruit. The fruit, by the way, is probably just fine to eat. I don't notice any difference in the flavor of the apples that have scab, and we've had no problems pressing them for cider.

If its been unusually rainy and cool, that's why you're seeing fungal diseases when you haven't before. It's really late in the season to do anything about the fungal problems, I'd let the trees be for this year. This fall, rake up ALL of the leaves and fallen apples (here's where my sheep and goats earn their keep!) - fungal spores will spread from the leaves that fell off of the tree. Early next spring, just before the leaves break out, spray the tree with a lime/sulphur spray - these "fruit tree" sprays are pretty common. Make sure you get good coverage of the whole tree. Then if you really need to control the fungus, spray every 6 weeks or so with sulphur. This is what I have to do in Western Wa, your area may be very different. Your county Ag commisioner will probably have a handout explaining this in your area.

No, your trees won't die from this. At least not for lots of years. Cedar trees can harbor fungal and insect pests that attack apple trees, so that may be what the other poster was referring to.
 

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Are there any cedar trees within a half mile of the trees? Cedar blight will infect some varieties of apple tree from as far as 1/2 mile away.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes, to about every statement. It has been wet and rainy and I have cedar trees everywhere. When you make your cider, do you boil or just freeze it. I have made it before and just put in the freezer and then we read where people got sick from the cider that was not pasturized. Would like to make again. I don't pick from the ground. Too many deer to take the chance. Would like some ideas. Thanks!
 
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