Apple organic pesticide question

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by brownthumb, Jun 8, 2006.

  1. brownthumb

    brownthumb Well-Known Member

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    My apples are being attacked by a small boring white worm. I have sprayed with an organic pesticide but some of these critters have not been deterred. I have removed all apples that had worms. I've got about 80% left. Anybody know what they are and how to stop them?
     
  2. woodspirit

    woodspirit Well-Known Member

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    In the old days the apples were made into sauce and cider and pies. Worms were expected. Today people want pretty food. If there were an organic product to use on apples that worked, then everyone would already be using it.
     

  3. Shadow

    Shadow Well-Known Member

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    After many years trying we gave uip. Raising organic apples that look good enough for people to buy them is really hard if not impossible. Apple orchards use tons of stuff to keep them bug and fungus free and there fore pretty fot the buyer.
    It takes so much that we no longer even try to get fruit from our orchard of 60 trees we just buy what we eat its cheaper.
    Just our experence. We are thinking of doing away with the orchard and that way we would have just another field to bushog. Hate cutting around the trees.
     
  4. TNHermit

    TNHermit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Where are you located.. if your going to cut trees that are of any size at all please let me know. Or find a woodworker in your area. Fruit trees are prized by woodworkers for tool handles and turnings.
     
  5. Greenhorn13

    Greenhorn13 Member

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    How about the little paper bags I've seen in some of the garden catalogs.
     
  6. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    There is an organic apple orchard right over the border in Canada and their apples are gorgeous. The owner gave our homeschool group a tour and talked all about his methods.
    For example, he uses pheremone traps. I also believe that dormant oil is very good to use and totally non-toxic. You spray it on before the buds form or the weather gets too warm or the sun will burn the buds.
    HTH!
    Do a google on it and see what comes up!
     
  7. Tabitha

    Tabitha greenheart

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    I have pictures to prove that our unsprayed apples looked picture perfect. Maybe it was the climate....we did very little, in the late winter I scraped the bark, really cleaned it good,for that I had a special tool, you can not do that on younger trees. Then we ran the chickens and turkeys in the orchard, in the hope they would pick up any worms, eggs etc. Later, when there were apple drop offs we let the sheep in the orchard, they ate every apple that fell off and if there was a worm in it it got eaten. also mowed down the grass;). we had 32 fruit trees. the only worms we could not get at were the ones in the yellow cherries. I guess we should have sprayed. so my husand made "Sherry" out of the yellow cherries (good stuff). it seems though that there are more bugs here in Ky. one for every variety of fruit or vegetable that grows.
     
  8. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm in Western Wisconsin, and there are a number of organic orchards around here. Also a local or rather regional organic orcharding group the I have learned a lot from.

    First you need to find out what the pest is, then figure out how to deal with it. Spraying a "pesticide" whether organic or not may do more harm than good if you don't match the solution to the problem. We get lots of damaged fruit that we use for cider, etc., and still have enough to store to last our family of 5 from fall until May or later.

    Bagging the fruit helps with some pests but probably needs to be done as soon after the petals fall as possible to keep things like codling moth and plum curculio off the fruit. You can use cheap plastic sandwich bags and a staple or wire tie to cover the fruit.

    You can grow organic apples but it might take more work.
     
  9. TNHermit

    TNHermit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You can spray Pyola on them. It has helped mine a lot. its a natural spray. Only time your not to use it is when they are blossom. the bees ya know :)
     
  10. Ramblin Wreck

    Ramblin Wreck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think this best sums it up...plus have a plan for the apples that do get a few bugs/other problems, which in my book is not a "biggie". Cut out the diseased or damaged portion and use the rest of the apple.
     
  11. kathy H

    kathy H kathyh

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    There are a couple things you can do. www.gardensalive.com has a product which is clay based which protects the fruit. Also traps work when you find out what pest you are after.