Anyone used an infusion on a sheep?

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by Mouse, Jun 15, 2004.

  1. Mouse

    Mouse Well-Known Member

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    Hi,

    I have a ewe with mastitis in one half her udder. She's on Naxcel and Banamine per the vet and I have to infuse a Cefa-dry ointment this evening. I'm a bit concerned about doing this correctly and want any advice you can give.

    Thank you,
    Mouse
     
  2. mawalla

    mawalla Well-Known Member

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    As long as there is not a blockage in the ewes teat you should be able to insert the teat cannula easily. There is only one way in so there will be no guess work for you. Once you do it you will be ok, it is quite easy to do provided your ewe is tied or held still.

    Good luck with the treatments. Are the ewes lambs weaned?
     

  3. Mouse

    Mouse Well-Known Member

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    Thank you. Yeah you're right, once it went in, it was in. However, there's so much scarring I think that I could only get 1/4 of the ointment in there. I massaged and rubbed and got a bit more, but more went on the ground. It took forever for us to get her to come to us, because she's been messed with whenever feeding time comes. So I've decided we'll wait till after eating, then go for the treat and then work on her.

    Yes, her lambs are weaned. They were born on Feb 14th. What happened was that we sold her lambs and another pair to a friend. We sent this ewe Sophia along with her lambs to help get them situated. She prolapsed, probably because there was a barn they could go under to get out of the sun and rain. So we went down and put the harness on her and gave the lady Pen G. Unfortunately because Sophia doesn't have a tail, the harness kept falling to one side or the other. Rather than calling me, the lady fussed with it and finally Sophia gave up on her and quit coming to her and food. I called her 2 weeks later just to check on everyone and she told me that the harness was still on but she couldn't get near her. So we hotfooted it down there to find a very skinny Sophia with a swollen udder and a few sores from rubbing. After an hour of chasing her, we cornered her in the front of that shed. I got my hand on her harness adn she dragged me until I hit a pole (resulting in a huge gash and bruise on my collarbone, but that's ok). I wasn't letting go. We cleaned her up and took her home. The lambs are old enough and I'm sure Sophia was weaning them already, so they'll be fine. They like this lady and come to her for petting and food. one even climbs into her lap, lol.
     
  4. mawalla

    mawalla Well-Known Member

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    Mouse, I hate to say this but.... it would not be best for Sophia to breed her again. The prolapse and the mastitis are two major problems that will probably resurface again only to cause you and Sophia more grief and discomfort. (By the way, what type of prolapse does she have?)

    How is the gal doing today?
     
  5. Mouse

    Mouse Well-Known Member

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    She is doing so much better. She's finally alert and eager to eat anything and everything. She was just running around, went out to the new pasture, came running back in and around. So I put out some fresh hay and she went to town. Her udder doesn't look so swollen anymore either.

    Yes, we don't want to breed her anymore. She is 6 years old on top of ot. She's a great mama, but like you said the grief and discomfort are too much for her and me. It was a vaginal prolapse just like 2 weeks before she lambed. And unfortunately the lady she was staying with didn't recognize it for a few days. I cleaned it and put lots of Furazone ointment on her, but couldn't get it to go back in. So I sent the lady to her house for sugar. Luckily hubbywas able to get her back in and she got better. I really see why people no longer dock tails so short, she has none. Poor thing.

    How would I go about making sure she no longer gets bred?? I mean she's going to go into heat, right?
     
  6. mawalla

    mawalla Well-Known Member

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    If you are going to keep her make sure she is seperated from the ram when you put him out with the ewes. Easier said than done, I know!

    If you really like her you could go to the expense of having her spayed. I have no idea what the cost of that is where you are, though. (I'll check at my clinic to see what my boss charges and you check with yours. We can compare prices. We spayed a cow for a client last year and I assume that the cost would be comparable.) If her wool is worth keeping for your fiber needs and you like her as a pet that might be something for you to consider.

    Of course you could sell her, too, and replace her with a younger ewe that would do the total job for you.

    If I were you, I'd also purchase a prolapse retainer. It's a plastic thing-a-majig that one puts into the ewe when they prolapse and is tied to the wool to keep it in place. I had to use one this year for the 1st time. The ewe lambed with it in place without a problem. I removed it about a week after she lambed and she has been fine. (I will sell her this year, however.) The retainers are very inexpensive.

    The guy who bought most of my lambs this year said that the Texas feedlots don't like those short docked tails on the lambs they buy because of the prolapse problems. (I'm assuming rectal.) He said they deduct about $.10 per pound for them. That was reason he liked my lambs. They still had some tail!
     
  7. Mouse

    Mouse Well-Known Member

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    Thank you. LOL, yeah I've thought about spaying her, that would be interesting. I imagine it would cost a lot, but I'll ask next time I'm in. I'd hate to sell her and give her next owner this problem, unless of course I could find someone without a ram who just wants her fleece. Her wool is incredibly soft. Our friend sheared her last year and process her wool, wow, so soft and snuggly.

    We have a prolapse retainer, but I don't know when I should use it. I had it overnighted with the harness when I needed it, but since the harness worked, I've never used the retainer.

    Definitely need tails on sheep. I'm all for long docking.