Anyone Up For Answering Questions?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by LadyofTheBarn, Dec 5, 2006.

  1. LadyofTheBarn

    LadyofTheBarn I Love My Dairy Goats <3

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    Hello, all! :) I'm new to HT and i've just been looking around here and there about the place. I just got in to goats earlier this year. I have PB Nubians, belong to ADGA and all that. I was hoping that you all could answer a few questions of mine so that I can ascertain the facts and start out strong with my goats. My thought was that if I get more than one person's opinion on a topic that I'll be able to make clearer decisions for my FurKids. Here goes!

    Do you test for CAE? How often? When? What age? What age to begin? Reasons why?

    What is your preference for dewormers? Do you like to switch up the dewormers to prevent immunity to the dewormer? What age to begin? Time interval between deworming? Do you deworm your pregnant goats? Reasons why?

    What do you vaccinate for? What age? Dosage? Why?

    Do you prefer pure alfalfa hay or half alfalfa and half grass/timothy? Why?

    What do you feed? Why?

    What are your thoughts on bringing other does on to your property to allow stud service?

    Why did you pick goats? The breed of goat?

    Thanks so much for your patience!! I realize that that was far more than "a few" questions and that these questions can be answered by a bit of reading (which I have already done.) I just wanted to get other views on how to run things and what really works.

    Thanks again!
    Allison
     
  2. dap

    dap lilsparrow

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    Welcome to HT LadyofTheBarn! I am to new to goats to answer any of your questions with any kind of intelligence, :shrug: but I'm glad you asked, 'cuz those are the kinds of questions bouncing around in my head too! :rolleyes:
     

  3. kerrinatoz

    kerrinatoz Well-Known Member

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    Even though I am quite new there are a few of these questions i can answer. I do think it is important to test for CAE and have already lined up a really great goat vet. Our does are on a 3 month cycle for deworming and will continue their present schedule. We are also using 2nd cut hay. Alfalfa can be way too rich for most animals especially for males from what I understand. The hay we've purchased is really good hay that just smells right, ya know? Anyway, I figure since they get so much it makes sense to use a good quality hay. We feed a great recipe mixture of dairy goat pellets, sweet feed (Vintage Victory) and black oil sunflower seeds in the hull. The stud quaestion is going to be a real question for me next year when we're going to get out girls some action. It is a bit risky I guess but i figure we're just going to really research the potential farms by seeing when they tested and rely on our network to see if their reputation is good.

    I will say we really debated over the various breeds but decided on Nigerians. Since we have very small children who are very good with animals and are going to be homeschooled, we really needed as bomb proof as we could get. So, we are going to be breeding Nigerians and probably showing as well in a few years. But since we have always loved Nubians, I think we will have a wether or two around for driving and some larger fun!
     
  4. goatkid

    goatkid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Montana
    Welcome to the forum. I can share with you what I do and it's up to you to do what fits for you and your situation.
    I have tested some of my does for CAE and plan to test more this month. Some folks test twice a year, others yearly. I don't have the cash to test the whole herd that often. I test when I'm wanting to know or if a customer wants the goats tested prior to buying them. The best reason I can think of for testing is to know of a doe's status prior to her kidding since the disease is spread primarily through the raw milk. You don't want the kids nursing from a positive doe or to receive her colostrum since heat treating it doesn't guarantee the virus will be destroyed the way pasteurizing milk does. We bloodtest goats 6 months and over.
    I use Ivermectin on adults and Valbazen on young kids. Does are wormed upon kidding and kids when they are about 2 months old. Bucks are wormed in the spring. When I attended ADGA convention, the vets there suggested to keep using the same wormer until it doesn't work anymore so that your goats won't develop immunity to every wormer out there. What area of the country you live in will determine what wormer you need to use. I don't generally worm pregnant does unless absolutely necessary, and NEVER with Valbazen. The reason is that I don't want to give any type of drug to a pregnant animal unless necessary.
    I don't usually vaccinate, but this year I did vaccinate the bottle babies with CDT at 4 and 8 weeks of age. Boosters are given once a year. The reason I did it this year is that I bought a buckling who had already had his first shot and I wanted to give him the second dose. There was enough vaccine in the bottle to do the rest of the bottle babies so I did that as those were the goats I showed and therefore would get the most stressed and prone to entero.
    I usually feed pure alfalfa though I've also fed a good alfalfa grass mix. The reason is my hay guy who is willing to deliver grows alfalfa and the goats do well on it. They don't care for a steady diet of Timothy.
    My goats get alfalfa hay and pellets. For grain, I feed the does a mix of COB, dairy goat pellets and BOSS. The kids get goat developer pellets. I give the bucks some of these too as they contain ammonium chloride to prevent UC.
    I'm very picky about bringing does here for stud service. I need to know where they came from. If I sell a doe to someone and she is not exposed to goats from other herds except to be shown, then I will breed her. Any person wanting to bring in a doe from an unknown background would have to have that animal tested for CAE and CL with a note form their vet that the doe is not a carrier. I would also never allow a doe who looked to be in poor health in with my buck.
    I think goats chose me. I grew up in the big city and had never really planned to have any livestock. I rented a place in the country primarily so that I could have cats and dogs. I got a job helping a friend on her goat dairy and those adorable baby goats really grew on me, especially the Nubians whic is the main breed I have, though I also have a La Mancha, grades, Nigies and Boers. I'm planning to phase out the Nigies and all but one Boer to focus on the full size dairy goats.
     
  5. DocM

    DocM Well-Known Member

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    NW OR
    In January, all my goats are tested. All ages. The first year they're on my farm.

    I alternate between cydectin and ivomec. I worm pre kidding (3 weeks), pre breeding (3 weeks), and as needed (watch coat, eyes, gum condition). Keep an eye out for a microscope you can afford and learn to do your own fecals.

    BoSE/CDT 3 weeks pre kidding, kids get tetanus when disbudded/banded, BoSE booster, CDT booster at one month, all other animals get CDT in late spring before show season starts. I don't vaccinate for anything else in this part of the country. Some people are recommeded to use Covexin 8 vaccine. Ask your vet or other goat owners in your area. Some does might get additional copper bolus or vit A and D as needed. If we are having a really wet nasty winter, I may revaccinate everyone with a CDT in late fall too.

    I feed alfalfa cubes because they're better than the alfalfa hay around here, and easier to store, and I buy them certified organic - 3 lbs per large adult a day, less for smaller animals. Free choice mixed grass hay is in the feeders all the time. I know hay cutters who save unsprayed fields and bale for me, lots of weeds, no chemicals - farm owners want it out of there so they can grow something good, I get the hay very cheap. My goats love it and thrive on it.

    Just recently made the complete switch from country blend organic goat sweet feed to unsweetened country blend all breed - basically dry cob, switching to their 14% horse blend now because I have found that horse feeds are more likely to be consistent in their quality, and do not contain "grain by products and roughage" - I want to know what my goats are eating.

    Only animals I know. Same with leasing bucks out. The goat people I know treat their animals the same way I do. I have my bucks collected in case someone wants to breed, there are straws available and a goat breeder in the area with a regular AI business.

    Human kids with milk allergies. Have had every breed of goat over time, settled with lamanchas because of their size and temperment. Still have some xbred nubian, alpine, boers. I enjoy showing now at open shows, still a 4H leader (20 years)
     
  6. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    North of Houston TX
    Do you test for CAE? How often? When? What age? What age to begin? Reasons why?

    All purchased animals are purchased tested, or on contract have ramifications for not coming back negative (ELLISA and PCR tested). All does here are colostrum tested ELLISA when kidding and the whole herd is tested in the winter when bred. I sell alot of kids to folks who test so do rely on their negative tests for checking out my program here, so far so good. It simply would put me out of busniess not to have negative stock.

    What is your preference for dewormers?

    What works on fecal. Do a fecal find the worm eggs, worm, then check teh fecal 7 to 10 days later to see if it worked. Using Cydectin now.

    Do you like to switch up the dewormers to prevent immunity to the dewormer? No. I use what works. Now if I fecal and see a worm that something else gets better/cheaper than yep I would switch that worming.

    What age to begin? Infant kids are wormed on schedule 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks then are fecaled....waiting to see any worm eggs or loos of color in gums in infants goatlings means they are not growing.

    Time interval between deworming? I fecal the first of every month. Since switching off Ivermectin we worm 3 or4 times a year now.

    Do you deworm your pregnant goats? They continue with fecals the whole pregnancy, sometimes they need to be wormed around 100 days pregnant, othertimes we go the whole pregnancy with no worming until they freshen.

    Reasons why? Because they have worms :)

    What do you vaccinate for? What age? Dosage? Why?

    I vaccinate for what are problems in my area.

    CD&T Kids get dosages at 6, 9 and 12 weeks out of vaccinated dams. Out of does who have not been here long, the kids also get a 3 week vaccination. Like my pups I think that the after 12 weeks shot is cruicial.

    Pasteurella pnemonia...I vaccinate the aged bred does whose colostrum will be used for the entire crop of kids, with a single dose shot of vaccine for pasteurella haemoticulla and multicidia. It's how we go to shows unscathed by the pnemonia bug.

    Lysigin...all virgin or unvaccinated does get a dose pre breeding, than everyone gets bolstered prekidding.

    All of the above is given 3 weeks before kidding.

    All does are given Bo-se 1 and 1/2 weeks (or close) before kidding.

    Do you prefer pure alfalfa hay or half alfalfa and half grass/timothy?

    We can't keep good alfalfa hay here, so we use alfalfa pellets.

    Why? Because they are dairy animals.

    What do you feed?

    I feed a equine dry mix to the milkers the last 50 days of pregnancy and while they are milking. Why? Because they are not pigs :)

    What are your thoughts on bringing other does on to your property to allow stud service?

    I do house and breed my 4H kids goats. I do outside service clean does. I just do a once over of them while the owner holds them, if she is not obviously ill or diseased, than I bring out the buck of choice on a lead, he breeds the doe, and he stands with me a few more mintues. When he goes to mount the doe the second time, as he brings his penis back in it goes through my gloved hand full of nolvasan.

    Why? I added this one :) So he does not catch anything from her.

    Why did you pick goats? The breed of goat?

    I knew I could handle them by myself. I picked Nubians because they were the ones in demand, and I was after a small business for my farm. Vicki
     
  7. LadyofTheBarn

    LadyofTheBarn I Love My Dairy Goats <3

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    Illinois
    Thank you everyone for your replies! I have another question that's been on my mind. I'm trying to figure out what i'm going to do in the spring when i have kids on the ground.

    Do you bottle feed or dam raise?

    -Allison
     
  8. AllWolf

    AllWolf We love all our animals

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    LadyofTheBarn
    I do not remember if I said welcome to the forum or not but here goes Welcome to the forums and have fun.

    Now you asked on this right here do you bottle feed or dam raise? Everyone raises kids different some bottle feed some dam raise. Everyone will have different opions on this subject. Me I mostly bottle feed.

    Good Luck and enjoy your goats. :)
     
  9. LadyofTheBarn

    LadyofTheBarn I Love My Dairy Goats <3

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    Thanks for the welcome, AllWolf! I'm leaning more towards bottle feeding, myself. But I was just wanting to get everyone's opinion on the subject. I think I will go ahead and bottle feed one year, and if I don't like it i'll try it some other way the next until I get my own routine set up. Thanks again,

    Allison
     
  10. DocM

    DocM Well-Known Member

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    NW OR
    All my does are tested, so I do both. Show udders, bottle raise. My personal milkers, dam raise. One doe hates babies - she will clean them up, nuzzle them, but the instant they try to nurse she starts batting them around the pen. She has a beautiful udder, so.. I use a bucket feeder during frantic times when I have lots of kids, or bottles if it's just a couple. I greatly prefer the bucket. I use hoegger's that takes both the pritchard and lambar nipples - I have both sets of neck rings. You can make your own by buying just the nipple and ring sets from hoeggers and drilling your own holes in a plastic bucket. For bottles I use plastic pop bottles iwth pritchards, or old wine bottles with the lambars. Yes, wine bottles! They're perfect, cheap, and I prefer glass to plastic.
     
  11. HappyFarmer

    HappyFarmer Well-Known Member

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    Do you test for CAE? How often? When? What age? What age to begin? Reasons why?

    Yes, and others too. Upon purchase(even at 3 months), at 6 month intervals up to 3 total, then yearly. Reason: to start out with & maintain healthy breeding stock.

    What is your preference for dewormers? Do you like to switch up the dewormers to prevent immunity to the dewormer? What age to begin? Time interval between deworming? Do you deworm your pregnant goats? Reasons why?

    Ivermectin. No. We worm once in the fall just after a hard freeze. Sometimes we worm once just after kidding. Hay 4-5 months out of the year probably helps us get away with this, along with rotational grazing. Cydectin is used on newcomers in quaranteen prior to release into pastures.

    What do you vaccinate for? What age? Dosage? Why?

    CD/T only. Twice before 3 months of age, yearly afterward. Horses are known carriers of tetnus, and my stock cost me towards the “high end” pricewise. Considering pneumonia vac but havn’t been pushed with a reason to yet.

    Do you prefer pure alfalfa hay or half alfalfa and half grass/timothy? Why?

    Prefer Alfalfa but usually feed mixed blend as alfalfa is hard to come by.

    What do you feed? Why?

    Pasture, hay, Charger, sunflower seeds, oats, loose minerals, baking soda, kitchen scraps on occasion.
    They’ve done very well on this for years & look great. Protein is important for us.

    What are your thoughts on bringing other does on to your property to allow stud service?

    Absolutely not. Bucklings are a dime a dozen & occasionally we have bucks for sale.

    Why did you pick goats? The breed of goat?

    To add to the zoo. Myotonic.

    Do you bottle feed or dam raise?

    Dam raise. Will change should we suspect/diagnose/test result problems.
     
  12. manygoatsnmore

    manygoatsnmore Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Welcome to the forum!

    Let's see...CAE testing annually and all goats brought into the herd are from clean herds. Usually do the testing about a month before the first kids are due to hit the ground, just to make sure no one's picked up a virus at the fair, or turned positive since the last test (rare in both cases, but I like to be sure).

    Worming: Ivermectin is still working well here, so that's what I use. 2 doses, pour-on med used orally, 10 days apart 4 times a year for adults. Prebreeding, just before delivery (or on day of delivery), and twice more staggered through the year. For kids, I worm with the CDT shots, pretty much the same schedule as Vickie listed, first shot with disbudding. I used to band wethers at the same I disbudded, but now I prefer to let them grow a few months before wethering. At 3 months, all bucks not worthy of herd sire status are wethered and grown for meat or pack/cart goats. At that age they can still be banded, and they have had a chance to grow that urethra a little bit more. Haven't had a case of UC, and don't want one! We also give Bo-Se shots several weeks before kidding, and our feed has selenium and AC in it (we are in a selelium deficient area).

    I prefer to bottle raise for tamer kids, but on first fresheners with small teats (and tested CAE neg, of course, I will let the dams raise them, at least until the teats gain a little size. Now that we are using an EZ Milker (and eventually getting our mechanical milking system set up), that will no longer be an issue. Even with dam raised kids, we make sure they are separated from momma part of the day and given lots of love and attention, liberally laced with treats, so that they associate humans with good things and come when they're called. My dd is the specialist in this area, lol!

    I prefer to feed an alfalfa/orchard grass hay mix, and give alfalfa pellets to all the stock as well. Right now, we are feeding grass hay and alfalfa pellets. We also feed Purina Show Goat for the cocci prevention. Our milkers get a 14% livestock blend, BOSS, rice bran, kelp.

    I have had just about all breeds of dairy goats (and pygmies) at one point or another. My dd has LaManchas and Alpines, and I have Oberhaslis and Alpine. We also have one last Nubian, a Pygmy waiting for pickup and a Nigerian Dwarf doe recently given to us. She is being tamed and dehorned, and then will be sold as a pet animal (to cover our costs and time). My favorites for sweet personality for the LaManchas, with the Obers being very similar in personality, plus the pretty bay color in Obers. The Alpines are bossier, but are great milkers and beautiful animals. I like the variety in personality with them. If I was to pick another breed to keep, I would go with Saanens. Gentle giant really fits them. I loved the ones we had, but there is a limit to how many breeds you can do justice to. Nubians are very popular just about everywhere, gotta love those ears, but I find them generally stubborn and very vocal. Our lone Nubian is fairly quiet for a Nubian, but still noisier than the LaManchas and Obers.

    I will allow outside breeding, but the does must be healthy in appearance and be CAE negative. I am looking at having my boys collected so that will increase the options.

    As you can see, there are as many ways to raise goats as there are goatkeepers. :)