Anyone living around Lubbock or Amarillo Tx.?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Big Dave, Apr 15, 2006.

  1. Big Dave

    Big Dave Well-Known Member

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    I am wanting to email a homesteader from the west Texas plains area. Is there anyone out there? I want to know how you heat your home. Thanks for any replies
     
  2. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We are not there now, but when we did live in Canyon, we had a heat and air pump put in. As I recall, the electric company financed it and gave us a discount on the electric bill as well. We were very pleased with it. At the time, our electric company was a co-op (Pedernales?) and we were only paying 2 or 3 cents per kwh with the discount. Those were the days! When we moved back to Central Texas, we jumped to 8cents/kwh; now we are paying close to 14. (I know, more than you asked.)
    mary
     

  3. Big Dave

    Big Dave Well-Known Member

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    We now live in Ar. And this state has no insentives for alternate energy. Did you ever buy firewood while you were there?
     
  4. greenmech

    greenmech Member

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    I lived in Lubbock for a couple of years in the mid 80's...worst place I have ever been to. We heated with electric and as far as firewood , if ya find a tree there its called a forest. One neat thing though a radio station gave away wild flower packs once and wanted everyone to scatter the seeds out thier car windows as they drove around the loop. It was very pretty there for a short while but it was still just a dry and barren place. Red skys from all the dust in the air , couldn't keep the stuff out of the house. I would hate to have to go back there again to live. Guess I just like being around green and open water when I want to get away.
     
  5. Big Dave

    Big Dave Well-Known Member

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    That sounds pretty desolate. Are there any farms or just ranches? Is it that desolate all the way to Midland Odessa? How do landscapers make a living? Is everthing shipped in? I am curious.
     
  6. Mudwoman

    Mudwoman Well-Known Member

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    I lived in Brownfield, TX which is just 35 miles south of Lubbock in the mid 1980's. The weather is extremely dry in the summer and we cooled with what is called a swamp cooler-----like an air conditioner with water running through coils. In the winter, we heated with electricity, but some people had natural gas. We caulked the windows shut so that the dust from the dust storms wouldn't get in the house too bad. Every year, we repainted the house as the dust storms would be so bad sometimes that they would sandblast the paint off the house. There are very few trees there. Mostly red sand and cotton fields as far as the eye can see. Flat. Tornados. Very little rain. Cold, cold, cold in the winter with winds howling. My dad spent a Christmas with us and said he had never been so cold in his life. People that have lived there most their lives have horrible teeth that are streaked with brown from the red iron oxide in the water----can't drink the water. The cotton farmers have just about ruined the land and the water with all the chemicals. Halliburton used to do quite a bit of oil drilling out there, but pulled out in 1985. I can't imagine trying to homestead there. Mother Nature is not kind there.
     
  7. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ................I have lived in Lubbock twice in my early college and beer drinking days . Lubbock and the country around Lubbock for a 20 mile radius or so is very flat . And , there are dust storms every so often and it can get very cold , at times . Now , the positives , Texas tech University is a state supported school and offers degree programs in just about any discipline you might be interested IN . They have a law school , Medical school , and will eventually have a VET school . And there are always jobs to support yourself . If you love the mountains you're only 4 to 6 hours away from N.Mexico (Ruidoso , ski area) , which means you can take many weekend trips and still be back to work on monday morning . The Humidity is very low , very few Mosquitos but you do have rattle snakes , etc .
    ................The basic rule IS , IS , If you want a low cost of living and low property taxes then move Too\live IN a small community with a stable population or as some would refer to It as "Dullsville" . This is how it is possible to buy an old wooden home , fixer upper for No money and do the REhab thing and NOT spend a fortune in the process . You can live in a small town , within a 30 mile drive of Lubbock and still.....NOT..... have to pay all those high property taxes due too the Idiot developers creating new Housing developments and the subsequent "Mo schools and Mo roads" .
    ................Northwest texas has alot of Positives when you have a true understanding of the culture , attitudes , and lifestyles of those folks who "Like" living There . It's like anything else , you have to allow alittle time to pass so you truly understand the whole way of life . fordy... :)
     
  8. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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    My daughter and her husband live there; they just headed back about 2 hours ago. She goes to school there, likes it, and may even stay after she graduates. My stepson also graduated from Tech 5 years ago with an engineering degree. It's kind of like an oasis in a huge wasteland. The city itself has lots of shopping, restaurants, hospitals, and facilities. Lots of huge cattle operations out there, feed lots, etc. I kinda like the town as well. But I wouldn't want to homestead in that area. Too barren for me.
     
  9. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

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    True there's not a lot of trees. First year we were there, the weather was very pleasant. Last year we were there, there was a drought. Fires everywhere, and the winds would howl. Dust would come in under the windows and doors and I always felt that I was breathing dirt. With the grass all dried up from lack of rain, when the wind would blow, the skies would turn brown. I was very happy to leave and move back to my home in Central Texas where everything is green and even when the wind blows, the ground stays on the ground.
    This year has been another big drought/fire year in the Panhandle. Worst ever, from what I have heard. I don't know how often it happens.

    Regarding landscaping, I had a friend who was considering moving down to Georgetown. She was very dismayed that the house they considered buying actually had a tree in the front yard, and thought they would have to cut it down if they bought the house. roflol So I don't know how big landscaping is to Panhandle residents. We did have a few trees around our yard, but it was the exception.

    I don't remember seeing farming. Not sure if it takes place there or not. They do have lots of feed lots. The land is cheaper because it isn't too good, in my opinion.