Anyone hit a cow or horse on road?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by manfred, Aug 28, 2011.

  1. manfred

    manfred Well-Known Member

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    A friend of mine hit a cow on the road last week. Happens pretty often here.
    As usual, no one owns the cow. It seems to be an unwritten law here, if your animal gets hit and damages a vehicle or injures somebody, deny it was yours.
    I know of an incident where a prominate rancher said it was not his horse even though had his brand.
    I feel these people should take responsibility, don't you?
     
  2. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    Be VERY glad no one owns the cow. Otherwise your friend would be responsible for damage/death to the animal. Any cow on the road has the right of way.... in Texas anyway. ESPECIALLY if there are fences and it's a known cattle area.
     

  3. FarmboyBill

    FarmboyBill Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, they should, but they dont. I hit a horse after it had already been hit by some girl going to work, as I also was. She went a 1/4 mile further and stopped and called her dad. He passed me before I hit the horse, he knowing by hewr call where it was he went around it. It was around 5 in the morning and the horse was black. I hit it with an old 72 Buick Skylark. One moment I could see the stars in the sky, then I saw the pavement up close and personal. When I got to the 2 cars, I could see him out talking to his DD. His car was fine. Hers had thwe whole front end rolled up under it. being a way newer car. Come to find out , nobody owned that horse, even tho the persoon liveing on one side of the road and had horses and a sign out that read, FOR SALE, Horses, Hay & Heifers. It was assumed that that horse had come up from Mexico
     
  4. luvrulz

    luvrulz Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hit one in Oh years ago - the farmer's fence was crap and it was his fault.... Luckily, there was no damage to my car, it was a '64 Buick...a tank!
     
  5. FarmboyBill

    FarmboyBill Well-Known Member Supporter

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    once, bout the same tima morning, round 4 miles further down the road I came upon several cows on either side of the road. I slowed way down, and it was a good thing cause as I got near past those cows, There stood a BIG BLACK BULL in the middle of the road. If those cows hadnt been there, I woulda hit him sure.
     
  6. DamnearaFarm

    DamnearaFarm aka RamblinRoseRanc :) Supporter

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    Depends on what state you're in- some, like TN are a fence in state and others like NM (we lived there for a little while) are fence out. Personally I think an animal owner should take responsibility for making sure their critters are secure, but, otoh.... accidents happen.
    I carry farm insurance that covers that, though.
     
  7. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Since you refuse to post your location one cannot answer. It depends upon your state. In some states the owner of the cow is due recompense from the driver. In most cases that I know of they usually do not demand it though.

    If you drive around out in the country you need to be aware that there will be critters out and about, some domestic, some not. In my opinion, drivers need to drive for the conditions. If that means slowing down after dark, so be it.
     
  8. Ed Norman

    Ed Norman Well-Known Member

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    This is an open range state. If you hit it, you are at fault. I always manage to miss them.
     
  9. Danaus29

    Danaus29 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    In Ohio the owner of said animal is responsible. If no one owns it and it's a cow you'll have a bunch of very expensive hamburger. I don't know what you would do about a horse since it's not legal to process them for food.
     
  10. Molly Mckee

    Molly Mckee Well-Known Member Supporter

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    In WA state we have areas that are open range--if you hit an animal you just bought it!
     
  11. garbear

    garbear Well-Known Member

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    you hit it is yours. Sorry but the way the laws here it is your fault. You are responsible for damages to the farmer or rancher.
     
  12. ksfarmer

    ksfarmer Retired farmer-rancher

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    :goodjob:

     
  13. houndlover

    houndlover Well-Known Member

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    It's happened here, but everyone knew who the horse belonged to. Did a heck of a lot of damage. Horse's owner was sued for a lot of money. Our fences are good but our nutty neighbor likes to cut fences and open gates so we have an umbrella policy just in case something like that happens. In Eastern Oregon, it's pretty common to see range cattle on the road - hit one there and it's your fault, signs everywhere saying "range cattle on road". So, it depends where you are.
     
  14. Waiting Falcon

    Waiting Falcon Well-Known Member

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    I think maybe in Missouri it is a law to have insurance if you live on the highway and have livestock.
    Here is a link that tells a little about the laws
    http://www.mwl-law.com/CM/Resources/articles22734.asp
    My neighbor hit a black cow at night with his pickup. Took two years to get it cleared and the owner to pay but he did pay.
    Another man said it wasn't his bull that went through the windshield of a small car. We all knew it was , that bull would not stay home regardless. No fence hot or high or tight would hold him. The man in the car died three months later. The owner of the bull never owned up to ownership. He sure lost the respect of the neighborhood.
     
  15. Minelson

    Minelson Well-Known Member

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    Come on Manfred...where are you from?
     
  16. manfred

    manfred Well-Known Member

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    I live in Oklahoma. Here the farmer is responsible for damages from animals on the highway . I think that is how it should be. I see cattle out on the edges of the interstate from time to time. Seems odd to me that the vehicle owner could be held responsible anywhere.
     
  17. DanielY

    DanielY Well-Known Member

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    We are an open range state also. it depends on where you are weather it is the drivers fault or not. I locations posted as range land it is the drivers problem. If not I don't think anyone is at fault. Basically it would be the state but you think they will own up? The reason it is not the owner of the cows fault is that they do not own the land, no control if it keeps his cow in or not.
     
  18. springvalley

    springvalley Family Jersey Dairy Supporter

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    Well here in ILLINOIS it is against the law to range cattle or horses on the roads. And if one of your critters gets out , you are going to pay the bills for damage for a car or truck or a death. About twenty years ago I was coming home from a friends place about 9 p.m. at night, came across 5 head of black cattle in the road, tails headed my way. I aimed for the biggest break in them but still hit one, they turned just as I got to them, striking one in the head. Never killed the calf but buggered up my truck very bad, bumper, fender, grill, headlight. Owners insurance paid the bill on fixing my truck, and he had to do that not long before with someone elses truck. The old guy that owned the cattle, wouldn`t fix his fence, so cattle were out alot. Not long after that he got rid of all the cattle, soon after that he passed away and the farm was sold. And I`m going to tell you another sad story that happened to a young neighbor some other time. > Thanks Marc
     
  19. plowjockey

    plowjockey Well-Known Member

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    Agreed.

    Making drivers repsonsible for hitting escaped livestock, is a stupid, unfair law.

    It just goes for the "deep pockets", which it the driver's insurance company.

    One of our drivers hit a steer, causing $13,000 in damage, to the truck. We had to pay to fix the truck and did not even get the "tenderized" steer, out of the deal.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2011
  20. lemonthyme7

    lemonthyme7 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yup, DH hit a cow once on his way home. To those who said slow down for conditions - he was not speeding and since we are from the area he knew the road. It was on a bend and the cow was right in front of the farm. No denying whose it was! Cow came out in front of him and there was no way to avoid it. Here in PA, as the farmer you are responsible if your animal gets out on the road and causes an accident. The farmers insurance paid for a new "used" vehicle for DH (his small truck wasn't worth a lot so it just replaced it at the truck's value). A cow is a pretty big animal to hit and he was lucky not to get hurt. If I remember right (this was a long time ago) he went into the ditch trying to avoid it but didn't miss it completly.