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Discussion Starter #1
I was in the shop looking for some bugs. I had no idea there were so many bugs that people keep in their home. Most of these seem to be food for pets and chickens. Some are food for people.

I'm curious if anyone here raises bugs as a livestock feed or for other reasons?
 

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I spent a good many years in herpetoculture (reptiles & amphibians) and many a folk would raise crickets, mealworms, roaches and the likes for feed of their keep.. Being as I kept pythons I had a rodent colony so I raised a warm blooded pest for my cold blooded keep.. Not aware of a bug raised for human consumption unless its being exported to China were everything is edible..
 

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My friend used to raise (not sure how to spell this, yellow worms that live in bran) meelly (?) bugs for human food. Apparently, it was tasty, but the chickens broke in and ate the lot.

I've heard of people eating crickets. I wanted to try it, but haven't had a chance. They were in chocolate and several dollars each.

Now that I learned I could buy crickets, I'm wondering what it would take to keep them. When we first moved to the farm, there were hundreds of crickets singing each night, but now none. European Wall Lizards moved in and ate them all. I was wondering if I could create a cricket friendly habitat that lizards couldn't get in, then release the crickets back into the yard. Not sure if this is a good idea or not. I just miss their song.
 

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I raised crickets, fruit flies, and mealworms for pet tree frogs that I used to have. Got the original stock from Petco, then Googled how to care for them. Easy! I kept everything clean, so my stock suffered no bad odors, mites or weird diseases that can easily decimate the entire population.

The only drawback that I found is that no matter how careful and supposedly "escape proof" the cricket bins were, there will always be an escapee (or a few) hopping around. Crickets are not a good inside-the-house project.

I loved hearing the crickets sing, so I kept a few breeding adults in something like this (which is definitely escape-proof), just so I could bring them inside when I wanted real live "Nature Sounds," lol.

https://www.amazon.com/Carrier-Amphibians-Fish-Aqua-Culture-SFS-ONLY/dp/B00FQT2R4W

I know, I know... I ain't right...but I am not alone! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crickets_as_pets


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Discussion Starter #7
Here's a funny thing that came in my inbox today - flour made from crickets. I like that it's gluten-free.

That's a neat thing about having crickets as pets. I'll have to ask the store (if they ever get back to me) how much crickets cost. Doesn't look like they eat much.

I wonder if there are different kinds of crickets. I wouldn't want to accidentally add an invasive cricket to our area that damaged any possible survivors of the lizards.
 

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Joie de vivre!
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That's interesting!

What market did you sell them to? What kind of markup did you enjoy?


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Look into bugs raised in a toxin-free environment for environmental testing. A friend of mine who passed on 10 years ago raised such fathead minnows that sold for about a dollar a piece as I remember. It is a steady market and if you are handy with electronics you can get into installing or customizing testing equipment.

See http://www.ectesting.com/organisms.html
 

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I raise mealworms to sell and feed to the chickens. They are a great source of protein. What good is it to raise my own food (chickens) if I am still buying my food's food (chicken feed) at the store?
 

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I was in the shop looking for some bugs. I had no idea there were so many bugs that people keep in their home. Most of these seem to be food for pets and chickens. Some are food for people.

I'm curious if anyone here raises bugs as a livestock feed or for other reasons?
Use too when I raised mice and hamsters.
Mealworms are extremely easy to raise.
Just keep a storage container with dry oatmeal and a couple cut up potatoes (water source). Put in a container of mealworms, and when you see beetles craeling around, your producing new mealworms since the beetles start laying eggs almost immediately and daily.
 
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