Anyone heating with radiant floor ONLY?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by SouthernThunder, Dec 3, 2006.

  1. SouthernThunder

    SouthernThunder Well-Known Member

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    Just curious if anyone is heating thier home with just the radiant floor. I have seen several ads saying that it is a common practice with thier state of the art system etc...
     
  2. painterswife

    painterswife Sock puppet reinstated Supporter

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    We heat will only radiant that we installed and plumbed ourselves.

    Nothing better than warm floors on a morning when it is -8 outside.
    No state of the art system here. Pex in the floor, two zones, and a on demand propane heater that heats our domestic hot water as well.

    Jill
     

  3. SouthernThunder

    SouthernThunder Well-Known Member

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    Thats cool. Almost exactly what I had in mind too. :)
     
  4. haypoint

    haypoint Unpaid, Volunteer Devil's Advocate Supporter

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    My neighbor built a wood boiler and created a 10,000 gal tank under the garage. The plactic pipes run between the floor joists against the OSB subfloor. Fires the furnace about every 2-3 weeks, more often when it's below zero for long. Nice even heat. The pipes do make sound as they expand when the warm water circulates thru them. Has 150 feet of 3/4 pipe that is in the tank to pre-heat the water before it goes into his elect. waterheater, too.
     
  5. ericjeeper

    ericjeeper Well-Known Member

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    using pex poured in the concrete. no noise.. I use a water heater.. But I use a Heat exchanger.. The fluid in the loop can never be drank. Thats is a bad bad way of doing it.during the summer. That waters just lies there dormant.
     
  6. painterswife

    painterswife Sock puppet reinstated Supporter

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    "The fluid in the loop can never be drank. Thats is a bad bad way of doing it.during the summer. That waters just lies there dormant."

    Not if you do it right! I plumbed mine so that I turn a couple of valves and the water flows through the floor before it hits the water heater in the summer.

    I actually have it plumbed two ways. It can flow through the floor to the water heater or through the floor and then out to the garden hose. When it gets really hot and I am watering the lawn, I will have it go through the floor and then outside. It then cools down the floor and it feels great on the feet on a hot summer day.

    Jill
     
  7. ericjeeper

    ericjeeper Well-Known Member

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    But what if.. what if some of that stagnant water gets to you iced tea glass? Legionaires disease?
    Heat exchangers are cheap.My family is worth a few hundred bucks to know they will never be put in Jeopardy of legionaires disease or any other problems from stagnant water
     
  8. painterswife

    painterswife Sock puppet reinstated Supporter

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    And what if you have a big house and you rarely run the water to one area of the house, same problem.

    I drink my water and I plumbed my house. Do you think I would take the chance?

    All I am saying is, it is possible to do it with an open system. It is up to each person to decide what works for them.

    Jill
     
  9. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    I heat part of the basement cement floor with thermal heat that flows through the lines (in loops) from the outside wood burning furnace and a small circulating pump. The heat rises to the floors upstair and aids greatly in reducing the furnace fan from kicking in.
     
  10. computerchick

    computerchick Keeper of the Zoo

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    Is it possible to do the same setup with an indoor wood furnace?

    Andrea
     
  11. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

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    We have a radiant floor system. One loop, one zone, fed from two water heaters. First the propane heater, and secondly an electric water heater, then through the loop.

    This also supplies our domestic water. [I am a American Legion member, Legionnaire's disease is from breathing mold dust from old forced-air duct work, not from water].

    We plan to include a thermal-bank of 300 gallons, and we will include a wood-fired water heater [a lehman's stove]. I do believe that a cup of bleach thrown into the thermal bank each spring and ran through the loop, will keep the water nice and 'fresh'.

    Right now we also use a wood stove from time to time. But that is because I have not finished with hanging the insulation yet.

    :)
     
  12. frazzlehead

    frazzlehead AppleJackCreek Supporter

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    Sure, it's fairly common here (and it's COLD here!).

    I do have a woodstove but that's jut to help take a bit out of the natural gas bill (firewood's next to free).

    My plumber installed mine: I've got a natural gas boiler that does all my hot water heating - heats hot water for the showers etc, heats the water/glycol mix that runs through the floors, and someday will heat my hot tub. :)
     
  13. insanity

    insanity Well-Known Member

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    I was just sitting here reading and brainstorming as i went, and thought of building a system just as you described. I had already planned the forced air part but hadn't thought about radiant heat to. What a great idea.
    Question did you buy the system or build it? What brand and model number if you bought it? Please.

    The system I'm thinking of building would easily boil the water in the furnace unless it went threw quickly and had plenty of time to cool before returning. Wondering how to do a pressure release or some safeguard. Guessing it would be easy enough to buy parts and copy a system though.

    I think, I'm thinking to big and way to hot. It wouldn't take that hot a fire when being forced air,let a lone radiant also.
     
  14. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

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    I installed a 12VDC circ pump first, then installed a 110VAC circ pump.

    So now the 110VAC pump is running, but anytime the grid dies [which around here happens weekly], then the 12VDC pump can be turned on, and will run for a week on it's deep-cycle marine battery.
     
  15. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Legionaire's disease requires that you inhale microscopic water particles contaminated with Legionaire's disease bacteria; drinking it won't give you the disease. The bacteria exist in most puddles and stagnant water expeosed to the air. (I have to take a Legionaire's update class every year due to some of my job duties, so I am usually up to date on the subject.)

    There could be problems with using your domestic hot water to heat your floor, but Legionaire's isn't one of them--and I personally don't think there is a problem with doing it, but to each their own.