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Discussion Starter #1
I need hose guides in my large garden to keep from dragging the hose through the plants when I water. Anyone have any ideas what I could use, preferably from stuff that I might already have. I don't want to use short metal rods or stakes, too dangerous with kids in the garden! Hoping all you creative and frugal gardeners have some ideas!

Thanks!
 

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You can do what we did. We had a bunch of metal railings from the top of a cyclone fence. Dh cut them about 2 ft long and pounded them into the ground. I know, I know you said no metal poles, and I thought the same thing with my four kids running around. BUT........dh cut tennis balls so they would slip over the pole sticking out and protect anyone in case they fell they wouldn't be hurt. They work great and the tennis ball actually holds the hose in place when you pull it instead of allowing the hose to "jump" the pole.

Just an idea!
mljjranch
 

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you could take pvc pipe and run it to the garden semi permanate and hook it to the water line, then take quick connects and hook the hoses up and turn the water on when needed, also put inline shut off valves in place this way the pipe is flat to the ground and no danger to the kids.
 

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I would use plastic flower pots with holes in the bottom turned upside down with a dowl or pole (that fits through the hole) pounded down into the ground. Cheap, easy and removable. I have seen this done with terra cotta pots as well, but I am pretty sure that i would break them.
I have also used plain old cender blocks. they are heavy enough to stay put and they are removable and easy to find.

Belinda
 

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Instead of dragging your hose all around, you could make an above ground sprinkler system with quick connects. Plan these connect points well, so you don't drag the hose all over. Use 1" black pvc pipe, its cheap and you can get fittings to connect hoses and sprinkler heads. Hide the black pipe in mulch.
 

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Why not use long metal poles, hammered into the ground? They would keep the hose where you want it and the worst the kids could do is run into them. (That's what I use because I was worried about the kids getting hurt, too.)
 

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Gayle in KY said:
Why not use long metal poles, hammered into the ground? They would keep the hose where you want it and the worst the kids could do is run into them. (That's what I use because I was worried about the kids getting hurt, too.)

I like that.....maybe hang some flower pots from the top just to make them look less "practical" and use them to hang birdbells in the winter :)
 

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Or you could do it the lazy way and stick a shovel in the ground where the hose makes a corner. A pitch fork and a spade at the other two corners should cover the situation.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all the ideas! I live in N IL so an underground watering system is more work/expense than I want to deal with right now. The perfectionism in me has been saying that all the hose guides have to be neat and the same, but I could use a cinder block in one place and a tall post another and it would work just fine! I tend to vary the layout of the garden every year so permanent stuff at this point wouldn't do. I may try some short stakes and pots - I had thought of using coffee cans. I used up all my tennis balls on posts near where the horse likes to put her head over a fence. Well, my garden may look funny, but as long as it grows that's all that matters!
 

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A good neat and cheap hose guide is a wooden stake with a juice can with both ends cut out over the stake. A hose drags much easier around a large round corner such as a large can. We put a steel fence post about 35 feet apart down the center of the garden. I have a piece of plywood that fits on top the posts. I drag the hose to each post and place a rotary sprinkler head on the plywood and hook it to the hose. We set a can in the area being sprinkled to see how much water has been put on. After a while you will know how long it takes to put on an inch of water, if that's the desired amount.
The fence post gets the sprinkler above most crops other than sweet corn.
 
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