Anyone have a Ford 900 or ever used one?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by seedspreader, Jul 31, 2006.

  1. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    Ford 900 a few roads over that's for sale. It's the tricycle type tractor, which my land is pretty flat (slow steady rise toward the back) so I am not worried about the stability issue.

    The lady says it has a live PTO... It was suprisingly bigger than I thought when I stood next to it.

    Anyways, just checking it out...
     
  2. boonieman

    boonieman Well-Known Member

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    Never used a 900, but all the old Fords are pretty much the same. Steady, reliable, pretty easy to work on. I have an 8N and I love it. Keep in mind that these old tractors are limited in what they do. I've semi-retired my 8N and just use it to do light mowing or pull wagons. I believe the 900 does have live PTO like the lady told you. Seems like Ford started somewhere in the 800+ series.
     

  3. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have a 960, tractor I learned to drive on, plan to keep it as long as I can. It's done a ton of work on the farm, was dad's main one when he got it, been rebuilt a time or 2 already. Needs a lot of rear end work, but I use it too much to tear it down! :)

    The middle number is real important as to _what_ you have. Many people just call them a 900 (or 800, or 600) but it could be anything. People just don't know... Look below the air cleaner in front of the clutch pedal, on the flat tab of cast iron. There you will find the serial # and model #, they are hand-stamped into the cast iron - can be kinda light or painted over.

    _If_ it truely is a 900 series and does have live pto, then it would have to be a 960, very good model. You will have the 5-speed tranny, live pto, 99% have power steering. Best of the lot.

    However, it could be a 950 which doesn't have live pto, or it could be a 940 which is a 4 speed without live pto.

    Then, it might actually be a 901 series - little newer, minor upgrades. _Then_ it could end up being a dreaded 971/981 model, which has the SoS automatic tranny. Was good idea, but there are 3x as many parts in one, a real money pit to repair, and at 50 years old, they all need repair....

    I would totally ignore what the person is telling you; these Fords are _often_ mis-represented, mis-pianted, and folks don't seem to 'get' the differences.

    Look for that stamped model number, & if it is a 960 or 961, you have a really nice tractor if it is in good shape.

    --->Paul
     
  4. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    It hast the 5 speed and power steering, though the power steering doesn't seem to work so well... I have been reading up on these and it seems as if this may be a common problem.

    What are they like to get parts for? That's my biggest question at the moment.
     
  5. ergoman

    ergoman Well-Known Member

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    I just sold a 961 tricycle. no power steering, the steering with a tricycle is pretty easy. It seems like it was about 40hp or more, but you could find out for sure at ytmag.com. Its rated for 3 bottoms, I used it with a two bottom for a few years and it worked fine. I also pulled a baler and wagon with it a few times. Would need to pay attention if your grounds hilly, but tricycles arent the "tip over deathtrap" people say they are. Did a good job on snow with the back blade, no filled tires or chains. I think some of those came with the "red tiger" engine that had a few more HP. I paid $1900 for mine with a fresh rebuild and sold it for $2400 in southern michigan a few years later. If you do end up getting it, I've got all the manuals and some spare parts for cheap. Only complaint I had was the clutch pedal is pretty high on the left and makes you raise you leg fairly high every time you press it. Its alot more tractor than one of the N series. I used two different ford dealers and ebay for parts, never had a problem getting them. Rock the front and back wheels side to side hard, if the axles/bearings are worn they will make an audible clunk, take $250 off per wheel if a shop is fixing it for you. Also look for oil leaks on the in/outside of the rims.