anyone grow thier own tobacco?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by bob clark, Sep 11, 2006.

  1. bob clark

    bob clark A man's man

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    I sure do miss chew. but when it got to $4.50 a can i had to quit. plus i didnt like the idea of paying a big company for something i was addicted to

    I dont mind the health risks. we will all die sooner or later

    can i grow my own chew here in southern Iowa?
     
  2. pasotami

    pasotami Hangin out at the barn!

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    I'm sure you could but the varieity would be the question. I raised Burley for two years to sell.... too much work for one person plus when I found out all the "stuff" they spray on tobacco (and other things) I understood why people die when the use commerical tobacco.....
    I know they raise some in Ohio and Penn. so I would assume you could grow a short season type but chewing the stuff may not be what you think it is.... I gave some Burley to my BIL that smoked - he put it in a pipe and then called me.... asked me if I was trying to kill him.... the stuff was strong I guess (I don't use tobacco in any form so I would not know.) The "old timers" around here grow their own - and I see they chew it but I believe they were raised chewing it.... I was also told it would worm pigs so I guess it is potent stuff. They make a "twist" out of it.....
    If nothing else, it would be fun to investigate....
     

  3. MaineFarmMom

    MaineFarmMom Columnist, Feature Writer

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  4. kitaye

    kitaye Well-Known Member

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    They grow tobacco at the Historic Village here so you should be able to grow it in Iowa.
     
  5. bob clark

    bob clark A man's man

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    thanks for the info
     
  6. wvpeach1963

    wvpeach1963 WVPEACH (Paula)

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    I grow two rows a year. Used mostly around the garden and dog box's to cut down on insect pests .

    But I put up about five gallons a year in a crock and bring it out at parties.

    Puts a stop to all the cigerette bumming . They can roll their own.

    This new generation claims they never smoke, nut get some beer in them and they sure do.
     
  7. hedgeapple

    hedgeapple Well-Known Member

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    okay, bob clark, i have lived on a working tobacco farm for thirty years and i can answer your question as we grow it and dh reserves some of it he grows to chew. but i have to say a few things first.

    first, i had asked HT to remove me from membership because i am trying to overcome internet forum addiction :) but your question drew me in because i hate to see skills lost and forgotten and since i was able to log in i feel like i should respond. secondly, and this is the really, really sad part, since i am a former law students (but decided it was not for me) i hesitate to post the complete instructions lest some kid tries it and gets sick or worse (you can get nicotine sickness from just working in the tobacco (i do not know if raising it on a very small scale would expose one to enought nicotine to make them sick or not, but i know people who have gotten sick from just working in it)) furthermore, raising tobacco for use isn't as simple as raising a lot of things for use and it really is more of a skill. but i went to the site someone else referred you to and it is very incomplete including the fact about curing that tobacco properly before chewing it and i was concerned that it you did not have a bit more information, you might make yourself sick. also, regarding chewing long green (that's what we call it here when you grow and chew your own), i personally feel that it is probably much more "powerful" than what you buy at the store to chew, so i would say be careful because i am under the impression it is basically a toxic plant (and i believe the part about killing worms and parasites) BUT i wonder if all the stuff the store bought kind is adulterated with is where the real danger lies, regarding long term dangers. i am aware of at least two doctors that have said they would imagine the store bought is worse for you


    some sites for you - though also somewhat simplified. tobacco is considered a labor intensive crop and hands on learning would be preferred, in my opinion.

    http://www.boldweb.com/greenweb/tobacco.htm

    http://www.boldweb.com/greenweb/nicoinfo.htm



    so-o-o-o, this is what i suggest, contact the university of kentucky agricultural college and request information on the production of tobacco from planting the seeds to marketing the product. also, maybe you could ask them to put you in touch with some of the county extentsion agents in counties with heavy production and maybe they could help you more and refer to you a video regarding production from beginning to end.

    perhaps i am overstating the importance of hands on learning for this, after all it is just a plant, isn't it, but since we have raised it on a large scale it just seems to me that pretty much everyone i can think of who grows it learned it probably as a child. there are a number of stages including starting the seeds (currently done with plugs and floatbeds but used to be done in plant beds, but i suppose could be done on a very small scale with seed trays but there are still things to know), transplanting (which i noticed one of the articles said to do in the evening but is done from morning until evening but the water used with the tobacco setters has usually had fertilizer and maybe other things such as pesticides added), fertilizing and cultivation (tobacco is a heavy feeder), topping (breaking out the tops of the plants when they begin to flower), regarding suckers - producers have it sprayed with sucker control - but you can just keep breaking out the suckers as they come in for the next several weeks; knowing when to cut, spear, and house it, knowing when it is cured AND if it has cured properly (those of us familiar with tobacco can look at the leaves and tell the grade and if it can be marketed or should just be thrown away (sometimes the tips turn black or if field conditions and cutting conditions were not right it will cure up green which seldom can be marketed to advantage and i do not think should be chewed )- there are commonly three main grades based on which section of the plant it came from and its color and texture - and dh only chews one of these grades, he will not chew either of the other two and he has been chewing for about forty years) and stripping and storing the tobacco. this obviously is not instructions for growing it as i said i am hesitant to give complete instructions and i do not know it is possible to be comprehensive without hands on experience. but maybe it will let you know that, in my opinion, you need to know what you are doing before you do it if you are intending to use it to chew. also, i do not know what kind of reaction a person might have when they first chew store bought chewing tobacco, but i personally have observed and know that a person who does not chew tobacco and decides to chew a leaf of long green can become extremely sick in about a minute or two and be vomiting. it's nothing to fool around with. and that is pretty much why i logged on and responded to your question though i did not completely answer it - because even thoughn i do not know you i don't want you to get sick because of a lack of knowledge.
     
  8. hedgeapple

    hedgeapple Well-Known Member

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    also, bob clark, the info in my post above is for BURLEY tobacco. there is another kind grown in more southern states, i think it is referred to as flue cured tobacco (not exactly sure ) and i know nothing about it or about how it is cured. i think the kind we usually plant is called tennessee ninety.
     
  9. bob clark

    bob clark A man's man

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    thanks for the info . sorry about encouraging you addiction
     
  10. PutteringAround

    PutteringAround Active Member

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    I just ordered tobacco seeds last wed. form the usda website. They were free, actually all the seeds are free. I chew tobacco also and have moved to the cheapest can that I can get $1 something a can, but I was wondering if I could grow my own also so I ordered some seeds.
     
  11. hedgeapple

    hedgeapple Well-Known Member

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    I'm hedge apples husband and I just wanted to reemphasize the part of my wifes note about getting sick from tobacco. First you can get what we call green tobacco sickness from working in the tobacco when it is big and still green, especially when it is still wet from dew or rain. It seems like the nicotine can more easily be absorbed by the body through the moisture. Second, you never ever want to chew tobacco till it has been fully cured. Curing takes around 3 - 4 months and is cured when all the leaves and stems are brown with no green or yellow. Even when it is cured is rushing it. It would be much better to strip it from the stalk after it is cured and let it age for a year. My wife mentioned the different grades. The bottom leaves are the mildest but have very little flavor, the middle leaves have more flavor but are pretty strong and potent, the top leaves are very strong. Third, even though you do all this, the tobacco can still definitely make you very sick if you swallow any of the juice. I have chewed long green for close to 40 years and on occasion still get weak or even sick from chewing. It is an addictive habit..
     
  12. hedgeapple

    hedgeapple Well-Known Member

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    hedgeapples husband here again, i do not spray any of the tobacco i use for chewing, not with sucker control or pesticides even though this makes for a good bit more labor.
     
  13. Tabitha

    Tabitha greenheart

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    my best friend rasies her own tobacco organically. I visited her yesterday and her small crop looked very good. she only smokes it in her pipe. husband's aunt told me how she and her brother were going to act big and chew some of the tobacco Grampa was curing. they cut themselves off a chaw and both got sick and passed out.