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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I will be attending my nephew's 1st birthday party in October, and I know that in Hawaii 1st birthdays are a big deal. At the party, I will be recognized as a godparent. I know that most people give savings bonds, money or gift certificates for a gift, but I have no idea how much to give. I'm guessing that the godparents give more (there are five sets of godparents.)
Can anyone clue me in on what would be an appropriate amount to give?
Thanks! ~Merry
 

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Maybe buy a savings bond in the babies name. You could buy another bond for him on every birthday. Also get him a small gift that he can open and play with. I would buy a $100 bond, but I usually go overboard on most things.
 

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Merri said:
I will be attending my nephew's 1st birthday party in October, and I know that in Hawaii 1st birthdays are a big deal. At the party, I will be recognized as a godparent. I know that most people give savings bonds, money or gift certificates for a gift, but I have no idea how much to give. I'm guessing that the godparents give more (there are five sets of godparents.)
Can anyone clue me in on what would be an appropriate amount to give?
Thanks! ~Merry
I suppose that the big 1st birthday is a tradition left over from more primitive times when the mortality rate for children under five was very high. Kind of like "yippeeeeee! he has made it this far - let's celebrate".

Anyway. I'd shoot him a C note if you can afford it. Certainly, no more. If that is too rich for your blood, make it whatever you can honestly afford.

donsgal
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the help. I had thought in the $100-$200 range. I have lots of opportunities to give people small, sentimental gifts or handmade gifts, but this is one situation where I would rather fit in than look cheap.
 

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We lived in the Philippines for 3 years and found that the first birthday was a VERY big deal.
Also, a custom that we thought was strange was that the gifts were piled on a table and unopened until the guests went home. The reason for this was actually a very good one! It was so that anyone who gave a cheaper gift because that was all they could afford, would not be made to feel "hiya"/ashamed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Susie, my brother and his family live in Pearl City, but I don't really know much of my sister-in-laws extended family. They could be cousins though~ it's a small world! We are staying in Waiana'e, at the Army recreation center. Last time we visited, we stayed in Waikiki, so we would like to see a different part of the island. We are also considering getting an island-hopping package; they are quite inexpensive. It should be a fun trip.
 

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I'm part Filipino. In addition to money, the other things already mentioned, certain things are considered good luck. Elephants with trunks raised up in the air are a biggie. Never, never give a Filipino anything elephantine with the trunk down, bad luck. So, if you wanted to get the kid something he could enjoy at his age along with the $, you could get him a stuffed animal elephant with the trunk up. My grandma must have had about a hundred elephants, all types, materials, and sizes, but all trumpeting proudly. :)

Shoes, too. Shoes are a big deal.
 

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Something else, in Filipino culture, the guest visiting a house always brings a small gift or something. Houseplant, knick-knack, food.....just, something. It doesn't have to be a big thing.

And, be careful with compliments. They tend to respond to compliments by giving you the object you were admiring. It's as if your compliment obligates them to give it to you. You can compliment, but on things they can't give to you, such as, Oh, what a nice house, what a nice place you live in, etc etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks, Susie, for the very kind offer.
Thanks to all for the tips. I will make sure I pack a few small gifts for when we visit someone's home, maybe I'll try to find something "Minnesota" themed, like maple syrup or blueberry jam.
I know my sister-in-law fairly well, and of course, my brother is my brother!, but my sister-in-laws parents and extended family seem to be more traditional, and I was not able to communicate with them verbally very well the last time I saw them (when we flew out for the wedding) so the more non-verbal things I can get right, the better!!! Thanks again.
 

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I don't know enough about this culture to give you a suggestion but just wanted to say what a nice thing it is that you care enough about this child and the family to make an effort research ways to be respectful of their culture and traditions. You are sure to make a fine Godparent to this little one.
 

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Dh is from hawaii and he has an idea for you. He said he's been to many first birthdays and he said a fun and favorite idea for the party is a 'money tree'.

he says you can get away with somewhat less money if you do this, using $1 bills, take a tree branch and fold the dollar bills to make leaves and attach them to the tree.
Starting a way to grow a savings for the baby. If you let the other Godparents know about this, maybe they'd go in on it as well and you can use bigger bills that way but still give less.

I said "hawaiian first birthday" and he said "OH YES...VERY BIG DEAL there!" he knew instantly what a big deal it is... though *I* wouldnt have had a clue (being from Oklahoma)
 
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