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SHTH scenerio lol.

Laura Ingalls' Mom Caroline had started a sour dough in the book the Long Winter. They kept it under the stove because it was dark and warm and whatever it was could grow. (there was no yeast for baking because the trains had stopped and food was scarce)

How do you make your own sourdough? Does it take the place of yeast when you cook?

Just wondering about it :).

Kat
 

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I made mine :)

I took about a heaping half cup flour with a scant half cup water, mixed them together in a crock. I then forgot about it for a few days. You are SUPPOSED to feed it every day but I think I left it alone for like 4 or 5 days. My flour must have had lots of wild yeast because when i remembered it I opened the crock and it smelled yummy and sour and faintly like cinnamon rolls. So I fed it another half cup of flour & water and let it ferment for 24 hours... then I think I did it one more time but threw out half of it so I'd end up with 1 cup of starter.

The way I make my bread is I keep about 1 cup of starter at a time. I take the starter, mix it with a cup of wheat flour and a cup of bread flour and 1 1/2 cups or so of water. I let that ferment for 24 hours and then I make my bread, reserving one cup of sponge to go back into my crock as starter. The rest of it gets mixed with about 3 tbs of olive oil, 3 tsp of sugar, and some more flour. Then I add about 1 1/2 tsp or 2 tsp of salt. Mix with kitchenaid... add more flour until the dough barely doesn't stick to the bowl. The wetter the dough the better crumb, in my opinion. I use a 50/50 mix of bread flour and whole wheat.

So then I let the dough ball rise until it's doubled, then punch it down, let it rest, shape into a loaf, throw into my loaf pan, let it rise. I often let the dough rise in the fridge for a day or so because I work full-time. Sometimes this process can drag out over 3 days. I just recently started making sourdough bread again so bear with me on the amounts... I tweak things every time I make more.

So anyway when it's risen I throw it into a cold oven and turn it on to 350... let it bake about 45 mins or so and pull it out. Don't cut it until it's fully cooled or it can lose some flavor and become gummy.

http://www.kuro5hin.org/story/2003/4/17/1055/55941
 

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The wild yeasts are actually ON the grain itself and stay in the flour dormant until you wet it. They like white flour the best, although I hear rye flour makes the best tasting starter.

Making a wild yeast starter is so easy... all you need to do is mix flour & water, let it sit for a day, dump out half, add fresh flour & water for a feed, etc. until it ferments and bubbles up to at least twice it's height after the feed. Usually takes about a week or so.
 

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i thought i read that sourdoguh can be made or started from poatoes.does this ring a bell to anyone?? i think it was in the back to basic book by readers digest.
 

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elkhound said:
i thought i read that sourdoguh can be made or started from poatoes.does this ring a bell to anyone?? i think it was in the back to basic book by readers digest.
yes it can! Never done it though. It can also be done with crushed grapes.
 

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Betho, your going to be just fine girlie. VERY smart! :)
Now, I am not so scared to try it myself. Yeast is the single most expensive ingredient in my bread even when I buy it in bulk. And when we move, stores will not be so close by. I need to really be as self sufficient as possible. Thank you for Kat for asking and THANK YOU Betho for enlightening me! :)
God Bless,
Michele
 

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I got my first sourdough starter from a logger in the mountains of Oregon--he said it originally came from Basque sheepherders there. He gave me a sheet with the recipes on it.

When I moved I let it die, by accident. I've always wanted to find someone who had that starter.

We made sourdough biscuits, sourdough pancakes, and of course bread. They were the BEST!!!

I kept mine in a fruit jar on the kitchen counter--loosely covered. I had to "feed" it about once a week--just threw in more flour and water & stirred it up.

If I wasn't using it for awhile, I'd put it in the refrigerator, which would suspend the growth of the yeast.

I lost track of that logger--he used to be married to my sister. I've often thought of looking him up to get another start from him.
 

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I have my own sourdough starter, and I make a small loaf of bread each Sunday.

James, if you want, I'll bring you a starter. I'm coming back to Texas and have to be in Austin on Friday, then again Monday the next week. Aren't you in that area?
 

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i read a article the other day in a farming type mag at the feed store.it had this fellow sourdoguh featured in the cooking section.it said he has experminted with dehdrateing it for years.now you can order it form him.it is suppose to be form the last gold rush in alaska back about 1899.i have not ordered it ...yet....lol..but i may.i wonder if there was different kinds of yeast flying around back then versus now.like the polution of today..wonder if it has killed off some wild yeasts??i dont know much about yeasts and stuff like that.thought some of you might like to see this link.

http://www.socclay.com/
 

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Supposedly, or so I've read, sourdough from each different part of the country taste different due to the different wild yeats varities. Also supposedly helps your immune system to have the "local" yeast variety.

galump
 

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It doesn't matter where you get your sourdough starter, within a few weeks of being in your environment the native yeasts will overrun the yeast strains that came in it. Rye flour does work the best for making a starter and will take off within a day or so where it can take white or whole wheat flour up to a week. I mix 50/50 rye flour with tap water and mix it up in a ball jar. put a paper towel over it and screw on a ball ring to hold it down and let sit onto of the fridge for a day or two until in doubles in size. Then I feed it with white flour by mixing it the same way and removing half the starter sponge and adding an equal amount of the new feed and mix it well. You can put it in the fridge to slow the yeast down and feed once a week. take it out of the fridge 24 hours befor you want to make bread.
 

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When I made my sourdough starter, I used 1/2-1/2 mix of flour (white) and water, and, put a bit of buttermilk in the initial mix. Now my sourdough has the taste and flavor that I want. I have never put in more buttermilk since the intitial mix.
Gloria
 
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