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I was told that it isn't hard, just need a good microscope. I foster for the humane society and want to keep a check on if my dogs are picking anything up from the fosters that go through. My anatoilian shepherd had his yearly visit and tested positive for whipworms. Last group of puppies tested positive for coccidia and now I am worried my yard will be contaminated and infect my dogs. Someone suggested just treating all new fosters as if they have it, well giving dogs a bitter tasting liquid for at least 5 days is not only a pain in the rear but can be costly. Besides I don't want to give un-needed meds. I saw lots of info and supplies for home testing goats but not dogs.
 

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I've never done fecals on my dogs, but I've done them on my sheep. I'm wondering if it's the same. Anyway, yes, get a good microscope with a mechanical stage that will enable you to move the slide very slowly and accurately while counting eggs. Must have good illumination and be AC powered not battery, and magnification of 100X. The McMasters slides are the best.

Also, Cocci eggs are very small and difficult to see.

I was fortunate to get a good microscope from a school auction.

Good luck!
 

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No, I don't do my own. I would absolutely assume every pup or adult dog coming through your foster care program needs to be wormed. I worked at a Humane Society in New York for almost 5 years, and we wormed/vaccinated every stray adult and every puppy that came in, unless it was an owner surrender with records proving the dog or cat and been wormed and vaccinated previously.
 
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