Anyone do flowers?

Discussion in 'Market Gardens' started by babysteps, Jan 2, 2007.

  1. babysteps

    babysteps living at 6800 feet

    Messages:
    524
    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2005
    Location:
    Cheyenne, Wyoming
    Do any of you grow and sell flowers at the FM?
    babysteps
     
  2. chicky momma

    chicky momma Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    429
    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2006
    Location:
    Southern Lower Michigan
    Always plan to but haven't gotten to it yet. It seems to work well for 1 lady at the market who sells them. Thats my background horticulture or floriculture. Do you? Lisa
     

  3. babysteps

    babysteps living at 6800 feet

    Messages:
    524
    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2005
    Location:
    Cheyenne, Wyoming
    I've not done any market gardening, but live on a busy road with an easy pull in drive way. I've thought just for grins I would maybe try flowers. I'd like to do something from seed. If they didn't sell I've not much invested and they would just plain look pretty in the garden. You can get other farmers market stuff in the summer in my county, but I've never seen flowers.

    If I stuck some glads in the ground now they might do ok. But I've wondered if cut flower bundles of zinna's and other flowers might sell.

    babysteps
     
  4. mommagoose_99

    mommagoose_99 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,456
    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2005
    Location:
    NY
    I sold gladiolas and Sunflowers at the Farmers market for a few years. I bought the Glads from Pinetree Garden Seeds. The colors that did the best were the Blues and White. The sunflowers that were yellow with dark centers did the best sales wise. I picked the flowers in the morning placing them in cool water. Some people add sugar to the water. I never did. You need to come up with a way to package the sold flowers for transport. I usually wrapped a plastic bag around the stems. I sold the Glads for $6.00 a dozen and the sunflowers $1.50 a stem. I had a problem with the stems tangling up in the 5 gallon pails . If you can put each color into a separate pail. Remember to add cool water to the pails as the day goes on. If the flowers get too hot they may wilt or the glads may start to drop. Pick your glads as soon as 3 flowers have opened on the stem. If more than half of the stem has opened save the stem for your own use.I cut the flowers to have as long a stem as possible. The sunflowers were aften 3 foot stems. Customers want the flowers to last at least a week and won't buy more if the flowers do not last long.
     
  5. tchan

    tchan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    210
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2006
    Location:
    northern arizona
    We don't have a farmers market within easy distance here but we do have a pretty busy swap meet. For the last 3 years I have sold all kinds of potted flowers and organic vegatables. At the beginning of the season when I show up at the swap meet I have customers waiting for me. My son and I only go on Saturdays and usually can make anywhere from $150 to $300 in less than 4 hours. I either have the flowers in 6 packs(annuals) or 3 inch pots. The 6 packs sell for 1.50 and the 3 inch pots for 2.00. As long as I have the plants to sell I can sell them. My only problem is growing enough plants to keep me going through the whole season. Last year I sold everything I had in one day! This year I have added a new larger greenhouse and am going to be building another one next month. As I grow almost everything from seed the cost is not too high. Also I only grow what cannot be bought at Walmart.
     
  6. wilderness1989

    wilderness1989 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    660
    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2006
    Location:
    Effingham, Illinois 5b
    At our local Farmer's Market the cut flower stand is the busiest stand. I don't if they grow all the flowers themselves of grow some and buy some. They have so many different kinds.
     
  7. mommagoose_99

    mommagoose_99 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,456
    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2005
    Location:
    NY
    For those New yorkers interested in selling bedding plants or anything grown in a pot, New York state requires a premises inspection. You will need to contact Ag and Markets before you sell. It is better to stick to cut flowers, although in New yOrk you need to charge sales tax on the cut flowers. I have a DBA and collect sales tax on all my non food items.
    Linda
     
  8. babysteps

    babysteps living at 6800 feet

    Messages:
    524
    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2005
    Location:
    Cheyenne, Wyoming
    Sounds like cut flowers might be a way to go. In my case the flowers unsold could only just beautify my own home/garden. I've always had luck with glads when I've grown them for pleasure. Thanks. I just might get inspired.

    :walk:
     
  9. JAS

    JAS Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    643
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Location:
    South Dakota
    I am trying to get my 9-year-old daughter involved in the market and have her working on flowers. Zinnias and sunflowers did best last year. The prettist arrangement was the teddy bear type sunflower with Hot Biscuit amaranthus.

    The other vendors do well with glads and dried arrangements.
     
  10. anniew

    anniew keep it simple and honest Supporter

    Messages:
    2,980
    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2002
    Location:
    NE PA
    I've sold flowers for several years. My best sellers in order are sunflowers, zinnias, lilies, glads (but will not be doing more as I always get thrips which destroy the saleability of the flowers and I don't spray), Ageratum and Dianthus Neon Duo. I also have peonies and various other perennials.
    At the farmers market my total sales are always enhanced when I also bring some veggies and/or fruit to sell. Some people won't approach my table with just flowers, but if there are veggies/fruits, they'll buy some of those, then add a few flowers.

    I also sell some perennials in pots in the early part of the season, but usually choose varieties that are also good for cuts. That way, if they don't sell, I can plant them for the following year's cut flowers and/or to divide for more plants the following year.
    Ann
     
  11. amwitched

    amwitched Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,178
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2004
    Location:
    Texas

    Check out texascolor.com. This family has had a couple of articles written about them.
     
  12. Marcia in MT

    Marcia in MT Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,655
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    Location:
    northcentral Montana
    I do statice. I plant all separate colors.

    I pick Friday morning or afternoon for Saturday morning market. I make up bunches of mostly deliberately mixed colors, about 12 stems per bunch. I fasten the bottom of the stems together with a rubber band, cut the stems off evenly, and put all the bunches together in a big basket. They sell for $3.75 a bunch, and I put the instructions on how to dry the flowers at home on their sign.

    Mixed blues, pinks, and white sell the best, but I sell autumn mixes, too.
     
  13. lonelyfarmgirl

    lonelyfarmgirl Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    6,437
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Location:
    Hoosier transplant to cheese country
    I once heard of an old man who planted his whole yard (acre or two?) in daffodils and narcissus. he had an honor booth on the road, and he would cut flowers and put them out there, like 3 for 2$ or something like that. people would just stop and put their money in the box. he made something like 6 or 8thousand a spring season off it.
     
  14. anniew

    anniew keep it simple and honest Supporter

    Messages:
    2,980
    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2002
    Location:
    NE PA
    I've had honor systems in two different locations and they work great. If I lose $20 a year it is a lot, and certainly cheaper than sitting at a stand all day...or hiring someone else to do it.