Anyone do a newletter or paper?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by designer, Sep 20, 2004.

  1. designer

    designer Well-Known Member

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    Home publishing, anyone do it? I'd like to do something like a newletter that focuses on country crafts. I checked on some printers, they have like 1000 minimums. I don't need or can afford that many. I want to start small. My home printer only does 8.5x11 so I can't do multipages without staples and the ink cartriges are $35 each. And how do they get that newspaper type paper. Does anyone still use printing presses?
     
  2. 1farmgirl

    1farmgirl Well-Known Member

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    Do you have a local Kinkos? I've always thought they were pretty reasonable. You could print off your first copy and then talk to them about what you are wanting. A local print shop would probably work as well but would be higher. We are running into that for advertising for our business, But we are using local.

    Kathy
     

  3. sapphira

    sapphira Well-Known Member

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    Hello ! I have been doing a newsletter for about 3 years now. I do a 4-6 page (2-3 pages, two sided) for family and about 10 neighbors. I started it to include the older people in our large family. I felt like they did not know the younger ones very well. I have several interests like what's going on really in the "ecology" of USA and then look through a lot of news- which I like to do anyway- for idiotic stuff. Have a family page too. That is entirely news of who did what-short and sweet- and a lot of spoofing and fun. This is not at all what you are looking to do but I type, print and cut and paste to my hearts content, then take the thing down to a now UPS store where I buy copy cards - cheaper that way, and use one machine in particular to print off about 45 copies of it all then mail some and deliver some - good walking. I would be interested in your craft newspaper. I love quilting, painting, sewing, xstitch, etc. I am ashamed I do not do it on word perfect but I just could not get around in the word perfect - but just bought a book at a yard sale - finally ! So look out family! Sapphira
     
  4. clovis

    clovis Well-Known Member

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    I own a business that brokers printing.
    Here is what you need to know:
    High speed copiers are the only way to go on this project. I would run it on 11 x 17 60# stock.
    Layout your newsletter in 8.5 x 11 format, then paste up those pages into 11-17 format. This is called pagination.
    You will have to get extra stock for your layout, and buy a roll of double sided 3M tape. Is the only way to go. Layout the pages, getting them good and straight. Use one piece of tape per page.
    You need to find a copy shop that will give you BROKER PRICING. It will save you the money that you need to make this thing profitable. They are going to be reluctant to give it to you, especailly with low volumes....but try to get it.
    Find a sewing/craft shop that will give away your extra copies, or work out a deal where you can partner with them on this project. This will help get your name out there.
    By the way, Kinkos is the highest priced place out there, so I would stay away.
    You might be able to buy your own stock and save some cash, but printers will want the stock REAM WRAPPED, not something you had laying in your basement.
    Have them run the job, delivering it FLAT to you. You will have to collate and fold them.
    Shop around. Good print prices are out there, especially in this Bush economy.
    clove
     
  5. JackieA

    JackieA Well-Known Member

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    Work for the newspaper here - our presses cost $30,000,000 (yes, 30 million) for the 2 of them! Guess that's not what you are looking for though :haha:
     
  6. Bruce in NE

    Bruce in NE Well-Known Member

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    There's software out there such as Pagemaker that now allows you to lay out your entire paper on the computer and print out the camera ready pages or just email them to a printer. Forget manual layout -- that's part of a bygone era. Pagemaker is kind of hard to learn but once learned, it's pretty user friendly. Serif Pageplus is easier to use and might be a better choice since I think Pagemaker is not issuing any updates any more.... but I used it for several years on my real estate catalog and it served me well.

    b
     
  7. cc-rider

    cc-rider Baroness of TisaWee Farm Supporter

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    Even Microsoft Word will do decent "desktop publishing" now. Actually, I like it better than PageMaker, which was what I always used previously. The MS Office Suite also includes Publisher which is easy to use for newsletters.

    I still use MS Word the most, however!
     
  8. BamaSuzy

    BamaSuzy Well-Known Member

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    I am the editor of a weekly newspaper that has an office in another county with it's COUNTY OFFICE HERE in my living room. Before that I worked for another weekly for mroe than 23 years and I still write for a daily, and have since 1984...all from a home office.

    To begin with, think that you are NOT probably going to make a lot of money at this....Print publishing is a hard way to make money, even on specialized newsletters....We have been printing this new newspaper for two years and my boss has yet to make a profit...and we are doing WELL!

    If you can get a craft shop or supplier to be an advertiser that would be great, you need some advertisers who will off set your publishing and postage costs....

    Also the post office can be AWFUL to deal with. We have two lawyers and the Alabama Press Association working on problems we have had getting certain permits....You have to have a large amount of folks before you can get bulk permits...I think the minimal used to be 200,,,,but I'm not sure now....

    If you go first class you're going to need to have advertising or some other means to off set that cost. Subscriptions alone will ot do it.

    If you do get good copy equipment, you might want to off set some of the costs by advertising that YOU will do printing for churches (such as printing their newletters or bulletins, etc.) to help off set some of the cost. But you must realize that if you have only ONE of each kind of printer, when it goes down, then your customers will still expect YOU to figure out some way to get their info printed on DEADLINE!

    There was great newspaper supply house that I dealt with in the early 1990's when we published a tabloid size Christian newspaper for two years....they were great to order layout sheets from and all kinds of other stuff but I can't remember their name. If I think of it I'll add it to this later. best wishes!
     
  9. clovis

    clovis Well-Known Member

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    Bruce in NE stated that pasting a 11-17 is old and out dated, which may or may not be true. Pasting up your 11-17 will allow you to give your printer an 'easy to do job', that is camera ready or "ready for the glass (on the copier)".
    If you email the work, which has been my experience over the last 8 YEARS, it will require the printer/copier to find the job, open the email, print the email, paste it up himself, then copy the job on a high speed printer. Let me promise you that they typically don't like the additional headaches.
    If you like to pay print shops for what is called PREPRESS, normally at $60 an hour, with at least a half hour minimum, then listen to Bruce in NE. Maybe he has more experience with this than I do.
     
  10. jesuisdiana

    jesuisdiana Well-Known Member

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    I usually lurk but thought I'd add my $.02. I do two newsletters a month, one here at work (a church) and one at home for our small town volunteer fire dept. I use Pagemaker for both which works great IMHO. The church one is usually 12 pages total on 3 folded 11 x 17 paper. There a calendar in the center on a loose 8 1/2 x 11 sheet of paper. I print the pages individually on computer printer and then print/collate them on our copier. We do about 300 a month and send them out under a bulk permit which costs about $35 roughly for postage. The fire dept newsletter is copied back to back on 8 1/2 x 11 paper. The local elem school lets the fire dept use their copier/toner, the fire dept pays for the paper. Their copier only does 8 1/2 x 11 paper. These are about 14-16 pages total (7-8 double sided) and we use a bulk permit there also and send out about 475 copies. The bulk postage cost for this is around $35 also. Good luck in your investigation/endeavors. Diana
     
  11. Shrek

    Shrek Singletree Moderator Staff Member

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    Establish a password only free website and then begin publishing a small circulation print newsletter with the changed with each issue web password. Offer directed advertisments to businesses in the distribution area to cover costs of printing supplies. Use doubke printing of the pages to install all components. 1st printing is bannerhead, graphics and advertisments in paint jpeg files. Second printing is text in word. As it grows add up to 4 printers to your PC until you can justify a mass printing from a single photo master. Initial profits are low, however overhead investments can be recouped quickly if it grows to larger circulation. Also begin by using only b/w format . As Mad magazine discovered, "cheap and unglossy' is quaint, appealing and cost effective.
     
  12. designer

    designer Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all the info. I've been working in MS publisher on my first one. I have to check with the local print shops for some prices. I wish I could print from home since I want to start small but my printer doesn't do 11x17.
     
  13. tngirl

    tngirl Well-Known Member

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    I had a neighborhood newsletter for about a year or two a few years ago. What I did was just make it like a book, open it up and there was printing on the front and back of the pages. I just printed it out on my home printer and them went to Office Depot and got copies. Then, I started leaving cards about my newsletter in peoples' mailboxes and just going up to peoples' doors and telling them about the newsletter. After a while, I had a few subscribers. And one way that I got more subscribers was by involving the customers. I held a best yard of the month contest, interviewed a feature f the month, and even the pet of month with a little award. When they are in the newsletter it makes them what to buy it to find out what I wrote. Maybe you could involve your customers somehow about their crafts. I hope this helps. Good luck and let me know when you get it done, I'd love to check it out.
     
  14. Shrek

    Shrek Singletree Moderator Staff Member

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    Designer,
    Im doing my small circulation ad paper on 8 1/2 by 11 and mucklage bondind the 5 sheets of the 10 page newsletter together so that I can print the low volumes at home at this time.
     
  15. designer

    designer Well-Known Member

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    "8 1/2 by 11 and mucklage bondind the 5 sheets of the 10 page newsletter together"
    Shrek, excuse my ignorance but what is "mucklage bonding"? Does your newsletter come out to be a 5'5"x8" booklet?
     
  16. Peg

    Peg Well-Known Member

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    I do my newsletter on MS word and print it on my own 11x17 printer, which I got used on E-Bay for this purpose. It's 1 page front and back, folded like a book so it actually has 4 8x11 pages of print. I found printing presses and Kinko-type copy places way too expensive. I wanted to have lots of different colors as it goes out to children.

    I fold it in 3rds and use a clear seal to fasten it. It takes a regular stamp. This was more cost effective for my size readership than getting a Post Office permit.

    I use 24 lb. white card stock I got from Quill Corp. www.quill.com and that has worked really well. It's a little bit heavier and prints nice. The price was reasonable too.

    Good luck! You can pm me with any other questions, or if you want to just see a sample of my newsletter to see what I'm talking about I'd be happy to send you one.

    Peg
    www.cookinkids.com
     
  17. Shrek

    Shrek Singletree Moderator Staff Member

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    Its 8 1/2 by 11. I collate the sheets and press them between two pieces of 1/8 inch paneling then glue the spine edge with a glue bead. I can bond them at a rate of about 4 a minute. Slow but suitable for a 100 per week circulation. As circulation increases, I will upgrade the procedure.
     
  18. Gary in ohio

    Gary in ohio Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The easy way is 11x17 paper folded for a 4 pages of printable area. Forget inkjet. Its just to costly, forget color its cost to much. Your best bet is a laser printer for proof and markup and a kinkos for the copies. You can get low end laster printers at $100, mid range sub $300. You can then use kinkos, office max (printmax).
    You can even send your printjob to printmax via the internet. Cost of 2 11x17 pages, 100 copies is about $34.