Anyone been to auction school?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by clovis, May 19, 2005.

  1. clovis

    clovis Well-Known Member

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    Toying with the idea of going to auction school. Would love some input from others with experience.
    Where did you go to school?
    What should I look for in an auction school?
    Are there pitfalls to avoid?
    Do you use your auctioneer training?
    Is it as hard to break into the auction business as I think it is? Any ideas about getting started?
    Thanks!
    clove
     
  2. pamda

    pamda Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My father went to school in Iowa in the '70s. He still auctions and we all work them also. I will ask him where he went tomorrow. He keeps in contact with them I think. He also taught my youngest brother. PAM
     

  3. clovis

    clovis Well-Known Member

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    I would also like to know more about the business. No one around here wants to tell me about the business side. I guess I can't blame them. I wouldn't want to train my competition either!
    Any chance your dad would share what he charges to sell estates or complete farms, without real estate? What does he charge for real estate?
    Does he have different rates if he sets up the items to be sold at the farm or estate and a another rate if the family sets up the sale?
    Any help is appreciated!!!!
    clove
     
  4. chickmomma57

    chickmomma57 Well-Known Member

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    My husband is an auctioneer. He went to Missouri Auction School in Kansas City, Missouri. He went there back in 1988, been an auctioneer ever since. He still stays in contact with the school and the teachers there. They can be very helpful if you find yourself in a situation and need some advice.

    I believe the course he took was a 2 or 3 week course. Very intense. They teach you all aspects of the business. First and foremost is you learn a chant. Then they review the laws, paperwork, different types of auctions (estate, government, livestock, real estate etc.).

    The auction business is a tough business, and I'm not surprised your local auctioneers won't share any info, especially what percent they charge. That's what they compete on. Some charge a lower percentage to the seller and add a buyers premium to the purchaser. Some charge a flat rate for advertising, some include it in their percentage. Some charge a reserve fee on items others don't. Some have a sliding scale of percentage. The higher the final total of the sale, the lower the percentage.

    I can say by experience, unless you are ready for some real hard and alot of time dirty work, don't get in this business. We deal mostly in estate sales and government sales. Estate sales can be alot of work. First you must be compassionate about the situation the family is in. Then you must be able to deal with the family squabbles about who should get Aunt Bee's china cabinet. Sometimes this is the hardest aspect of the business. Government sales are easier, but lets face it you must deal with the government, never easy, always confusing and frustrating, but at least there is no sentimental aspect to it.

    We've also done alittle real estate, the percentage usually charged is comparable to the real estate agents fee. Usually a percent or two lower, but the sellers pay the advertising fee. I know in our state, you must be a licensed real estate agent to auction real estate. You need to check with your state for the regulations that would govern you. Some states you must be a licensed auctioneer, others don't have a licensing.

    A good start would be to contact NAA (National Auctioneers Association) they would probably be able to give you a list of the schools, laws in your state and requirements. Some states even require you do an apprenticeship. Well, I could go on and on. Hope I helped alittle.
     
  5. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Please note that auctioneers have a statistically high count conserning heart problems, apparently its the chanting stress.
     
  6. clovis

    clovis Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for your replies. Keep them coming!
    clove
     
  7. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    Can anyone answer why the big mile a minute chanting thing? I've been to a lot of auctions and I've run across more than one guy who I couldn't decipher.

    I went to one of those fancy pants auctions once for the rich folks and it was more of just a simple straight forward auction without the...well ....the mile a minute gibberish. It was much easier to understand and follow.

    I don't know why but listening to an auctioneer makes me very sleepy. If I sit down on anything halfway comfortable at an auction I'm out like a light. Same thing happens if I have on the superior livestock auction on RFTV. Works better than counting sheep.

    Anyway, what's up with the mile a minute gibberish thing? Just some sort of tradition?
     
  8. pamda

    pamda Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We charge a 20% fee for most all auctions and a per hour fee for some set ups as they take for ever. The last one was just belongings and cars. Took two weeks and had to have security at night due to a family dipute. The estate paid for everything. The 20% is from the proceeds and sometimes there is a fee for advertizing.

    The auctioneers who chant (sing) so you can't understand them I find hard to trust. There are more than one around that do that and you find a larger amount on the bill when you go to pay.
     
  9. clovis

    clovis Well-Known Member

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    I hear alot of people say they can't understand a certain auctioneer. I think sometimes it just takes a trained ear to understand a particular auctioneer. Aren't the fast chants created to speed up the sale and to create a sense of urgency and action at a sale?
    The best guys in town are fast, but have a knack for slowing down when they need to.
    How do you learn when to slow down?
    So how do you become fast and still be able to be understood?
    What is it that makes some auctioneers so popular, and really draw huge crowds and get the really good estate sales?
    Thanks!
    clove