Anybody sell their goat milk?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Kathy'sKID, Aug 19, 2005.

  1. Kathy'sKID

    Kathy'sKID Kelly in Nebraksa

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    I have a lady in town who'd like to buy mine. Not getting enough yet to really do that but she left her number with me for when we do. I'm just not sure I really want to get into it...well, yeah, I would like to....just a little unsure of the logistics and worried what if something was wrong with the milk. I'd prefer to sell raw and give instructions on how to pastuerize as we drink ours raw. WHat kind of price would I charge?
     
  2. Mrs_stuart

    Mrs_stuart Well-Known Member

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    We sell our milk...cant keep it around (most of the time) and then there are times that i have it coming out my ears...
    We have flyers up at every vets office in town and at all the feed stores. We advertise the milk for animal use and sell a lot of it for just that ...I also sell it to people who "know" that i can only sell for animals ...but what they do with it is their business. We sell ours by the quart, glass mason jars with lids for $1.50 per quart...

    Belinda
     

  3. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    We sell it for $5.00 a gallon. Walmart sells it for $3.12 a quart.
     
  4. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    I sell mine for $6 per gallon. Alot like what has been said "For Pet Consumption Only". Check out realmilk.com and find out the legalities of it in your area first, but make sure you are dealing with facts and not what others tell you! Enough said :)

    I milk, strain and then pour a 1/2 gallon of milk into a gallon size Glad Zip Lock Freezer bag. I stack these flat in roasters in the freezer, no more than 4 high or they will burst the bottom bag! When fully frozen I stack them in a frostless freezer.

    I actually started selling my milk (1990) frozen in 5 gallon buckets to a candy maker who would come and pick up milk weekly, drive with it home in the back of her pickup (lids on of course) and so the milk would still be slush when she got home, poured it into huge stainless pots, let it defrost overnight and make candy (mexican pralines) in the morning. Than I sold milk in mason jars fresh...but once it sat for 3 or 4 days, do you sell it? Make it into cheese? So I started freezing it, as did my customers to get through the dry period. So I just moved to selling only frozen milk and my customers love it. Right now with drying looming in December, everyone not only is picking up their normal order, but several bags more to stock up from Dec thru March when I am dry. I make cheese, soap, lotion and yogurt with frozen milk so it doesn't really change it at all.

    Check out your prices (many sell milk for $8 t $12 per gallon), make sure you are actually making a good profit off of selling your milk, I think most are suprized how much it is actually costing them to get that gallon of milk in the fridge! Adding valued products made from your milk to sell, cheese, soap, lotion, or even veggies and herbs from the garden mulched with goat manure, makes a nice little cottage business.

    Find you niche, give them incentive to drive past the others who sell milk to you, be cleaner, offer other products, a place to picnic. Remember that your customer base will rarely be someone in your area, but the larger town, the folks who can't have goats, health conscious, yuppie, ole hippie folks. So advertise on the free boards at the stores they frequent. Vicki
     
  5. longhorngal

    longhorngal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hi,
    I'm just curious....so goat milk tastes as good frozen and then thawed out to drink? I never thought of freezing milk for drinking though I do freeze goat milk to make soap from. I'm not milking goats myself yet, just buy from local people. Trying to get enough $$$ together to get a herd going soon!
    Cara
     
  6. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    Even back (god forbid) when I fed my children grocery store milk, I would freeze the gallons when it would go on sale. Defrost and shake them up and feed, you couldn't tell the difference. So no you can't tell the difference between fresh or frozen milk, especially if the goats milk fresh is good tasting with a low somatic cell count. I do know that poor milk will make poor cheese no matter if it's frozen or not :) and it can actually curdle when frozen. But with all things being even there is no difference. You can tell chemically it makes no difference or you wouldn't be able to make cheese or yogurt with it.

    I am by far not the only one selling frozen milk, all sites that ship milk are also selling it frozen, since with 1 day UPS you can ship a styrofoam ice chest nearly anywhere, no ice, no dry ice. Vicki
     
  7. longhorngal

    longhorngal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks Vicki, it sounds like a good idea and I will try it. Since I hope to eventually sell some milk it just makes more sense to do it that way. How do you test for somatic cell count? I hadn't heard of that and googled that term and found some good articles but none specifically said how you test. Is it something you take a sample of milk in and your vet does?
    Cara
     
  8. Eveningstar

    Eveningstar Active Member

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    I applied for a license to sell goat and cow milk for animal feed only. I did this about 4 years ago and am now getting back into goats. Just from reading on this forum, things have really changed in those four years. I got $2.00 gal just to get the extra out of the fridge. Not many people up here wanted or knew about goat milk at that time. I used most of it to raise our own animals and for our own use.
     
  9. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    Cara your vet should know where to send a milk sample into. Here it's Texas A&M or now they have a mastitis clinic in Homer, Louisiana (LSU) You could also find the local club in your area through ADGA.org and call the president of the club asking where samples are shipped for local DHIR tests. Or if you know a dairy cattle person? Or on ADGA.org click on Committees than click on the chair of Production Testing and email her and ask her for a local source. Vicki
     
  10. Mrs_stuart

    Mrs_stuart Well-Known Member

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    We to get an excess at times but we freeze it insted of selling it cheap and make cheese later or...I sell a lot of mine to cattle people...the market is high for calfs and such so saving them is worth the money...a few day old can go for several hundren dollars around here and a few month old for 450 or so...they cant seem to get enough of it once they know where to get it. I have posters at all of the local vets and have talked to the vets and when someone calls them, they tell them to call me for fresh raw goats milk...I have sold to people with puppies, rabbits, goats, deer, calves, cats, and older sick animals that have a hard time eating solid food...once they know how good it is, they always come back...even at $1.50 per quart.
    I have a few humans that purchase 2 quarts per week...dont "know" what they do with it...but they say it is great stuff.

    Belinda
     
  11. LuckyGRanch

    LuckyGRanch Well-Known Member

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    Depends on the goat! :)
     
  12. steff bugielski

    steff bugielski Well-Known Member

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    I am liscenced by the state of NY to sell raw goat milk. I get $6 a gallon, they bring their own container. Cheese and yogurt reguire pasturization by law so I stick with milk. I also never have enuogh milk, untill Feb. that is. It is an hour plus drive for most of my customers. The winter weather keeps many of them away. But soon as the weather breals in spring they are back in droves. I also have flyers up in all health food stores fof 70 miles around.
    Steff
     
  13. tltater

    tltater Well-Known Member

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    Steff,

    How hard/expensive was it to get your license? And what part of NY do you live in?

    Tracy
    Southwestern, NY
     
  14. MaryNY

    MaryNY Well-Known Member

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    Ditto what tltater said.

    MaryNY
    Near Syracuse, NY
     
  15. Eveningstar

    Eveningstar Active Member

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    To get a license, call in to your state department of agriculture. Here it is in the plant and pesticide division, might be under a different division in other states. Tell them you want to obtain an animal feed license. They will probably send someone to your farm. Just explain to them that you would like to sell your milk for "animal feed only". There is a minimal fee
    ($10.00 or so) and as long as they know what you are doing with the milk (how it is "processed"), they will send you a permit which states for animal comsumption. The permit has to be renewed every year. I put the milk up in glass jars with a label on it which specifies it is raw milk for animal feed only and what the people buying it do with it is unknown to me. I designed a label for my jars with the farm name, address and phone number. The label also states the percent protein of the milk, and percent fat. If they want to drink it, that is totally up to them but the labeling and permit is there to protect you. I had a cooler in the milkhouse on which were written the name of the person getting the milk. I could keep track of my jars better this way. They would come on a certain day and get their milk. Payment was on the honor system and we never had a problem.
    I feed calves with the milk right now since the market is pretty high. In the spring I also raise lambs on it when the ewe is too dippy to know that she just had a lamb. (Lamb pays my dentist bill so what can I say) Pigs that are raised on milk are excellent. Haven't done that for awhile though.
    Hope this helps, Elizabeth.
     
  16. Eveningstar

    Eveningstar Active Member

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    Then again you can go Grade A if you have a few thousand to spend on all stainless steel equipment. E
     
  17. steff bugielski

    steff bugielski Well-Known Member

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    I do not think it was that hard. We did ours just about as cheaply as possible. Call the dept of agri. in albany. They will send you out' flyer 518?'
    In it they have absolutly everything you need to know and tons of stuff you do not. I asked to have someone come out to show me what I needed to change before I spent any money. They were very heplful. Most of the things are common sense. The milking area must be of non pourous materiel, we chose concrete. The milk room must be of non porous materiel, we chose stainless and concrete. You neede a wash sink and a rinse sink. You need a hand washing facility not near the milk. you must sanitize your equiptment prior to use. We do not have a bulk tank, we have a 10 gallon can which must be kept between 32 and 40 degrees. Because it is raw customers must come to me. I choose not to supply containers so they bring their own.
    My milk inspector was very helpful giving me as much info as I needed. The only downfall is the testing. We are required to test for anti-biotics every batch. The supplies for that are about$50 a month. we must test for Brucellosous and tubercullousous annually.
    We were able to use stainless steel sinks that we had and we constructed the milking room after we talked to them. All in all I do not think it was hard.
    Feel free to pm me with any questions. You can even come out and visit.
    Steff
     
  18. Kathy'sKID

    Kathy'sKID Kelly in Nebraksa

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    To those of you who freeze your milk....how do you thaw it? Every time I've ever thawed milk in a ziploc it leaks out.
     
  19. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    Ziplocks are not meant to hold liquid. 1/2 gallon of milk in a gallon Glad freezer zip lock. Freeze it flat, I use roasters, and don't stack to many on top of each other. I also go to Wallmart and purchase rubbermaid cereal containers with white lids. I sell these for cost. Unzip the ziplock, turn your bag upside down and put in the fridge, let defrost. Only use your cereal container for defrosting milk, and transfer the milk from the plastic into glass for best flavor. Something that as I am showing the customer how I do it, they will notice very quickly I do not.

    All the talk of poor tasteing and keeping quality of milk from plastic, I wonder what is really going on. I have grandbabies who pour their own milk, I will not have glass containers of milk in the fridge with them here. We keep all our milk in plastic :) I make my cheese in food grade plastic containers, and my cheese presses are hard plastic. Vicki
     
  20. Kathy'sKID

    Kathy'sKID Kelly in Nebraksa

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    Thank you for the helpful info!