anybody interested in Dams and ecology?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by wvpeach1963, Sep 17, 2006.

  1. wvpeach1963

    wvpeach1963 WVPEACH (Paula)

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    anybody interested in dams and thier effect on river ecology?

    Not talking about flooding people out, I'm talking about removing dams that have no use any longer and the effects ecologists say that has on cleaning up our rivers like within a year.

    If anybody wnats to discuss dam ecology give a holler.

    I posted it somewhere else and got a lot of political repsonses.

    Not interested in that, wanted to discuss how serious a problem the water ways in your neck of the woods are having with polution and id this dam removal has been seen to work by anybody to reverse that.

    Let me know and I'll post a few links.
     
  2. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I am interested in such; however I find the whole issue ends up being very political & just raises my blood pressure.....

    In other words, my view quickly turns to what you don't want to discuss - so I'll stay out of it, but follow the thread if you continue with anything.

    I think you will run into many like me. :)

    --->Paul
     

  3. I'm interested so post away. I live next to a small spring fed creek that the old timers said use to really be full of big fish before someone built a dam right before it empties into a large river. They say the big fish would come up the creek from the river but can't no longer get past the man made dam that is now on the creek. My mom would talk about when she was a little girl how during the spring they would catch eels that would migrate up the creek to due their spawning. So I can see one way how it would effect the creek. What are some other ways?
     
  4. cindyc

    cindyc Well-Known Member

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    This is SORT OF an answer to your question. What to do about this issue depends on the science behind it (don't worry, this is not a politcal answer). So, what is the current presupposition about science has a lot to do with the reccomendations made with regard to water clean up. There is a good book on a related topic by Dr. Charles Dewberry. It is called "Saving Science; A critique of Science and it's role in salmon recovery."

    Scientists make a lot of statements based on "data" that is only completely emperical if you are a logical positivist. But scientists would ignore the "allegorical" information you are getting from the folks who live there for the "current data".

    If you have interest in these types of subjects, it might be worth the read. :)

    In any case, if people live along the creek, they would have a potential rise in the flood plain. That could affect peoples houses. That is another possible affect.

    I am only just beginning to review this subject. I don't really have an opinion as of yet. In fact I only came across the subject indirectly, as I have been reading some things on the subject of science.

    Interesting thread.

    Cindyc.

    Cindyc.
     
  5. Muskrat

    Muskrat Well-Known Member

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    I live in the Tennessee Valley and those dams, though they did take a great deal of land, provide the electricity that has brought industry to the south. The impoundments have brought tourism to at least East Tennessee.

    In West Virginia, where an entire branch of the family resides, until the East Lynn and Beech Fork dams were built, flooding was a fact of life and wreaked heavy damage on homes and businesses. Twelve Pole had never had fishing to cheer about before the dams, but now does have lake fishing.

    The dams and locks have made navigation of streams possible. They've interfered with the fish no doubt, but are we willing to give up the electricity, irrigation for farms, and water for our major cities they supply? Without air conditioning and lights, Las Vegas ceases to exist. The fruits and vegetables of Southern California would disappear.

    Run off from manicured lawns, farming, and highways, diversion of water for human uses, and "civilization" in general have to be taken into consideration along with the effects of merely interfering with the flow of water and the movement of the aquatic creatures.
     
  6. savinggrace

    savinggrace COO of manure management

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    Hello,

    I am interested in learning about this topic but for an opposite reason. I am looking into a micro-hydro-electric power plant to enable us to go 'off grid' as we will not be able to afford a 25% increase in our electric bill!

    Anyways, our creek is a very high quality stream, the Upper Nippersink Creek (of McHenry County, Illinois). In our immediate section of creek, there was formerly a saw mill and a grist mill; two dams and a mill pond. All that remains of the dams are a few concrete and rock piles of rubble that the creek meanders through; and all that remains of the mill pond is a small mosquito breeding swamp.

    I am currently researching flow rates ect. at different times of the year; once I have that information I will work with an engineer to determine what sort of micro-hydro-elect-power plant I can have without any dam system. (working with the "natural" or current flow pattern).

    Thank you,
     
  7. cindyc

    cindyc Well-Known Member

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    In a lot of areas it is illegal to augment a stream or creek in any way. You might want to check into that first.