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I have an opportunity to go back to school this fall to get my job skills up-to-date, after I lost my previous job due to a severe injury. The state div. of rehabilitation will pay my tuition. I am looking at a course to become certified as a specialist in Microsoft Office. I will need to get a desk job, and most all jobs I see advertised around here require MS Office. I'm thinking that if I can pass this course and get an official certificate, it will help me to at least be even with younger people who might be applying for the same jobs.
The only downside is that it will mean being out of work for another 6 months at least, since the course goes from Oct - Feb. That is going to get us into scary territory, financially. The course is full-time, so I can't work while taking it. However, I'm hoping it will be worth it at the end, that I will be able to qualify for a better job than I could now, with my out-of-date skills. My last job of 10 years was very specialized, the things I did there don't really translate to any other kind of job.
It's kind of exciting and scary all at the same time. I haven't taken a continuing ed. course for over 20 years. I hope my ol' brain can handle the stress! Does anybody have any (hopefully success!) stories to tell me?
 

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You know, we had a friend who was over 50 (I am not sure of her exact age, but know she is older than me and I’m 47) who had a good job and decided to change her career. She wanted to be a nurse! She went back to school and did just fine.

I’ve taken some adult continuing education classes at night college and there were several people in class that again were older than me. Granted, most of the students were young, but hey, who cares? They seemed to like us older folks just fine and we did well in the classes. :)

Go for it and congrats to you!
:)
 

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Ramblin wreck, I have a feeling some of my "school mates" won't even know that people can LIVE to over 50! If they give me much trouble, I can always whack em with my cane....
 

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Nohoa Homestead
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RandB said:
I have an opportunity to go back to school this fall to get my job skills up-to-date, after I lost my previous job due to a severe injury. The state div. of rehabilitation will pay my tuition. I am looking at a course to become certified as a specialist in Microsoft Office. I will need to get a desk job, and most all jobs I see advertised around here require MS Office. I'm thinking that if I can pass this course and get an official certificate, it will help me to at least be even with younger people who might be applying for the same jobs.
The only downside is that it will mean being out of work for another 6 months at least, since the course goes from Oct - Feb. That is going to get us into scary territory, financially. The course is full-time, so I can't work while taking it. However, I'm hoping it will be worth it at the end, that I will be able to qualify for a better job than I could now, with my out-of-date skills. My last job of 10 years was very specialized, the things I did there don't really translate to any other kind of job.
It's kind of exciting and scary all at the same time. I haven't taken a continuing ed. course for over 20 years. I hope my ol' brain can handle the stress! Does anybody have any (hopefully success!) stories to tell me?
I think it would be wonderful for you to return to school because of the circumstances, however, I would really seriously rething the Microsoft Office route. If I were you I would get a certificate in some kind of accounting skills such as bookkeeping or even Quickbooks as it will make you more valuable to a potential employer - thus hopefully providing you a higher salary than being a certified Microsoft office expert.

donsgal
 

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YES, if I can do it at age 57 you can too. I too had an injury and Texas Rehab plus help from a pell grant, paid my tution and books. But I did have a check coming in from Workers Comp. Insurance.

I took Medical Office Management. It was only a "certificate", but I graduated with a 3.5 grade average.
 

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I'm not 50+, however I did go back to school for a degree at the ripe old age of 45. You are never too old. Why can't you go full-time and still work? Good luck in whatever you do, but don't let age be a factor in your decision!
 

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I went back two years ago at 40. Divorce, move, back to school, busy year.

I should graduate next May with a bachelor's in psychology. Was planning to go to graduate school for a master's in counseling psychology but am now really considering a phd or psyD.

It was really scary at first but very exciting. It was tough at first being older than almost everyone, even the instructors. I got over it and am really glad I'm finally finishing my degree.

If I go for the masters, I'll be 45 when I finish. The doctorate would take me to about 48. I don't know yet. I guess we'll see...
 

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A close friend of mine went back to school in her 50's and earned a law degree! (not that this country needs more lawyers!)
 

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I would not pursue the mentioned program but rather an orientation toward mobil computer repair, $40.00 to 70.00 per, work when you want to, be your own boss, ect. The need is there in a growing field.
 

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Critter Mama
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Due to being young and dumb I Had my first child at barely 17. Between working and having kids, I just never had time to go back to school. When I married my present husband he MADE me get my GED. At age 50 :)
I aced 3 of the tests with the equivalent of 100%. So at least now I'm a graduate :):)
 

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MS Office may not be the best way to spend your school time. It is important that you learn parts of Office, especially Excel and Word. Depending on the job, PowerPoint may or may not be helpful and you may never even see Access.

Many schools nowadays aren't even giving credit for taking Office classes. Learn it at home by buying Office for Dummies or something like that. Spend school time and money on bookkeeping/accounting classes or something else in a specialized field. Those are the ones that will pay off, plus you can build on them later if you decide to go back for more education.

I don't know the extent of your injury but I was able to work part time while going to school full time and vice-versa when needed. Sign up in the clerical pool of a temp agency and work during the day while you go to school in the evenings - you may get your foot in the door somewhere or make some good contacts, plus you'll be gaining valuable experience since you'll probably have to do small tasks using Office programs as you go.

Good luck to you!

/VM
 

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Last weekend we met a lady at the general store in Terrelton, OK born in 1922, got her GED at 55, earned a bachelors in child psychology, then became a teacher. If she can do it, you can do it.

I changed careers from banking to IT at 45.
 
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