Anybody grow peanuts to roast/boil?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Silvercreek Farmer, Jan 11, 2007.

  1. Silvercreek Farmer

    Silvercreek Farmer Living the dream. Supporter

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  2. perennial

    perennial Well-Known Member

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    I don't know how, etc., but would really like to know also.
     

  3. mistletoad

    mistletoad Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We did it a couple of years ago. Bought seed at the feed store and planted it. That was about it really - had to keep the bed weeded of course and they do need a long growing season, but even in our clay soil we got a decent return.
     
  4. tink67

    tink67 a wannabe with a plan...

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    We did it when I was a kid. We always had a HUGE garden. My dad always let me pick one out of ordinary (for us anyway!) thing to grow. One year, it was a huge crop of sunflowers, a couple of years it was popcorn and several years it was peanuts. From what I remember, it was much like mistletoad said, just plant 'em, weed 'em, pull 'em and hang in a dark closet till they dry.

    This link might help, it's about Virginia/Carolina peanuts: http://aboutpeanuts.com/infougro.html
     
  5. via media

    via media Tub-thumper

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    I grew a few as a novelty and was pleasantly surprised when I had real, honest-to-goodness peanuts.

    It turns out that they were easy to grow. They just sort of sat out in the garden all summer and bit into the fall. I pulled one and saw that the peanuts were ready so I pulled the rest and let them air dry right there in the garden, per the advice of someone here on the garden forum. I roasted (toasted?) them in the oven and they turned out really good.

    I'm not sure what the scientific way is to know when they're ready; I just got lucky. One thing is that they tend to grow a bit deep so make sure your soil is well worked or else it's hard to get them out.

    /VM
     
  6. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We always had a peanut patch when I was a kid. They're easy to grow. You just put them in the ground (shelled). In late summer/early autumn you pull them up, let them dry, shake off the dirt and pull them off. Store them in a dry place and roast/boil when you feel like it.
     
  7. Starlighthill

    Starlighthill Northern Michigan

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    Boiled peanuts was one of many things we missed after leaving the south for the frozen north. James Earl Jones was raised about 1/2 hour from here and says in his biography that his grandpa grew tobacco and peanuts up here. I never would have guessed it.
    We did grow them one year and we did get a crop, though I'm sure the yield was less than someplace with a longer growing season. They were pretty easy, seems we planted them in hilled rows.
    I'll try again this year.
    Starlighthill
     
  8. Ramblin Wreck

    Ramblin Wreck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you mean how do you grow them, it's pretty much as simple as Ravenlost indicates. They are a legume, which means they fix nitrogen to the soil as a side benefit. After harvesting, which is simply pulling the nuts out of the ground by the bushy top, we dried ours on top of an outbuilding that was roofed with tin. Boiling peanuts is somewhat of a culinary art in the South, and there are some much better at it than others. I had an Uncle who would only use Virginia peanuts that made a good living selling boiled peanuts at local high school sporting events. He never shared his cooking secrets. My Dad would rather roast his, and boy did it make the house smell great.
     
  9. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We preferred ours roasted too and many afternoons we would come home to peanuts roasting in the oven of the wood stove. And Mama always had to have peanuts to make her famous peanut brittle every Christmas. Daddy would usually boil a pot when we first pulled them while they were green.
     
  10. tamsam

    tamsam Well-Known Member

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    If you have good soft soil they can be pulled up, but we either used a shovel to turn them up or a good turning plow. That way you get them all. You want the green ones (before they are dried) to boil. To dry we washed them and let them dry for a bit then put them in burlap sacks and laid them in the sun, turning every so often and kinda mixing them in the bags. As well as I can rember we baked them at 350. If you want you can shell them and deep fry and put on newspaper to drain and salt to taste. Dang this makes me hungry for peanuts. Good luck and enjoy the nuts. Sam
    PS For those who want to taste if you can find them there is a brand of canned boiled peanuts called Peanut patch. Aso we used to rake leaves and work into the clay soil to make it soft.
     
  11. Silvercreek Farmer

    Silvercreek Farmer Living the dream. Supporter

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    Thanks everyone, it sounds great, I am going for it!
     
  12. perennial

    perennial Well-Known Member

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    well, i'm all excited - i'm going to add that to my list of things to grow this year.
     
  13. FrankTheTank

    FrankTheTank Well-Known Member

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    I'll dig it up, but MN did some experiment on growing peanuts and they actually turned out pretty well. Its the seed that is hard to come by (must order it) around here.