Anybody foraging for mushrooms now?

Discussion in 'Plant and Tree Identification' started by moonwolf, Sep 2, 2005.

  1. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    What are you collecting at this time for wild mushrooms?
    The last few days I've found some nice birch boletes and suillus sp. (slippery jacks) and saffron milk (lactarius) mushrooms. A bonus was a crown branching coral mushroom growing on decaying on wood in an poplar/spruce location. These are distinctively peppery tasting to make a fine culinary addition for my fall recipes. Nothing fancy. I like wild mushroom omelettes and such. I am thinking to chop some to make wild mushroom and wild rice pankcakes.

    A book I picked up in the libraray by chance which I recommend is called "The Practical Mushroom Encyclopedia" by Peter Jordan. It has some excellent recipes with illustrated method descripitons. The photographs of the edible mushrooms in the book are outstanding, as are the comparison with the poisionous mushrooms with cautions on how to pick and choose while foraging.

    What are you finding out your way for edible mushrooms now?
     
  2. Island of Blueb

    Island of Blueb Island of Blueb Supporter

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    I have been getting Shaggy Manes just about every day lately. Well, most of the summer actually. Now is the time for Chanterelles here. In a month or so I will start looking for Coral mushrooms growing on hemlock logs and stumps. I love looking at the price of mushrooms in the grocery store, then going out and finding a couple pounds for free! I am in Southeast Alaska.
     

  3. woodspirit

    woodspirit Well-Known Member

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    Just read today about a guy in Buffalo NY who died after eating wild mushrooms. He was in his mid forties. He called poison control and he was being treated in the hospital in Rochester NY, but died of liver failure. I guess he was waiting for a liver transplant.
    I mention this because it is very important for people to understand the risk. Also read another time, that most of the deaths occur among mycologists. They are the mushroom experts.
    I love puffballs myself. Fried in butter. But please be careful.
     
  4. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    Here is a list of the edible fungi that I have so far this late summer/early fall season have picked and ate. I'm still alive. :buds:

    Leccinum scabrum.........Brown Birch Bolete
    Lycoperdon excipuliforme........Woodland Puffball
    Lactarius deliciousus..........Saffron Milk Cap
    Boletus badius.......Bay Bolete
    Boletus edulis.......Cep or Porcini
    Hericium ramosum.....Comb tooth
    Clavicorona pyxidata......Crown Tipped Coral
    Auricularia auricula........Tree Ear
    Marasmus oreades.....Fairy Ring Mushroom
    Suillus luteus......Slippery Jack pine bolete
    Suillus americanus....Chicken Fat pine bolete
    Hypomyces lactifolorum......Lobster Mushroom
    Armillariella mellea........Honey mushroom

    I have not found chanterelles yet and wish I could find some.
    I should be able to find oyster mushrooms, but have not yet.

    We have had frost now and good moisture, so the fall mushrooms should begin to flourish hopefully.
     
  5. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    To add to my list above, I found today my first Blewit of the Season.
    It's a beautiful lavender mushroom that is higly fragrent. Smells like perfume.
    The scientific name is Clitocybe nuda, or also knows as Lepista nuda.
    In a group of fall 'Thanksgiving' mushrooms.

    Check out the link:

    Wood Blewit
     
  6. pyper7

    pyper7 pyper7

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    Hey Moonwolf, those Honey Mushrooms....ever try the ringless Honey Mushroom /Armillariella tabescens? I found a beautiful clump today and have never eaten them before. I cross referenced and spore printed, but haven't had anyone around who's tried them. All the books I have say they are very good, but can cause stomach upset. It's been crunch,crunch,crunch in the woods around here. Still kind of early for the Grifola frondosa, Hen of the woods, and last year I found several gi-normous ones so I can't wait.
     
  7. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    I have only found the ringed honey mushrooms. Be very careful about eating any honey mushroom. They shouldn't turn yellow if bruised on the cap, for one thing. Also, there are characteristic small black scaly appearance to the cap. Honey mushroooms should always be blanched first, or cook in water and dump the water out and cook again. It's supposed to get rid of the toxin that causes stomach aches or cramps. I change the water 3 times to feel safer. These are popular here with an ethnic group. They don't store all that well. Honey mushrooms are 'okay', though not in my group of favourites to eat. I'de probably be as happy with Marasmus oreades (Fairy ring mushroom) instead....but not eaten raw.
     
  8. pyper7

    pyper7 pyper7

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    Also forgot to mention that my yard has quite a few oyster mushrooms, but the darned weather is just too warm and they're full of beetles (yuk)
    Also have a good bit of abortive entolomas down by the creek and we usually enjoy them with scrambled eggs and onions, but again, bugs! We finally had a cool-down and a shower yesterday, so maybe things will look up!
     
  9. birdie_poo

    birdie_poo Well-Known Member

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    Supposedly there is a shroom group here in San Diego county. The wont return email requests for info. I thought it would be really neat to go on a tour of areas where they grow wild, since the house farms are taking over, and they may just go away.

    I bet is sure is nice to walok around and still be able to see plant life in it's original habitat.

    Around here, if they find species that are endangered , they dig up a gigantic plot of the best specimins and relocate them. It's sad to see all these business and one fenced off area with flags all over indicating which species is in there. Takes away from the whole beauty of it all.