anybody else train goats?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Caprice Acres, Jun 1, 2005.

  1. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    I own Pygmy goats, and my doe is better trained than most dogs out there. She walks on a leash, pulls my friends around in the wagon, and makes sure that you are walking on the side of the road if a car is coming. Does anyone else have stories to tell of trained animals, or thier teqniques for any type of training? I would like to teach her how to pull a cart without anyone leading her or walking behind her. If anyone has advice, please share it!
    Thanks,
     
  2. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    They certainly are smart !!!!

    I train my dairy goats just by repitition....they milk in a certain order....one that I know is smarter than the rest has learned to jump up hook hoofs on door stabilizing boards and slide it open if it isnt latched, she also pushes out the lock block on the milking stand when she is ready to be done. She pushes on me for attn. gently not a butt.

    Not sure how to make them go without leading....mine also follow. I dont have them pull anything. You might try the pack goat keepers....there are a few on here and I think they have a website.
     

  3. sancraft

    sancraft Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I trained mine to eat and drink at the same time. To open any and every kind of feed storage container. To ignore me when I call unless I have corn in my hand. To step in the milk bucket when I'm milking out the last drop. To escape every fence in creation and to give me gray hairs. :soap: :grump: Boy I sure to love my Baaaddddd babies. Heading over to feed in a few minutes. (they really arent' that bad ;) )
     
  4. JoyKelley

    JoyKelley Well-Known Member

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    my 7 goats sleep in 3 seperate stalls. in the evenings i go in the field and call, "go to your rooms". They split up and go to their own stalls and the horse goes in hers and the mule goes in his. The only one who is " special" is the donkey, she stays with me while I get her dinner and then goes in her stall and eats first .

    If someone is not feeling co-operative I call out.. " no one gets to eat until " so and so" goes to their room" Figuring the pressure and embarassement from thier peers will get them moving , and unbelievable it seems to !!!
     
  5. Ellie5

    Ellie5 Well-Known Member

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    Hmmmmm, Looks like I have some training to do. Does coming when you shake the grain pail count?? lol

    I think that's great - someday perhaps I'll get into harness training, but right now my plate is just too full......
     
  6. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    Mine know "come", "back" (meaning don't crowd me), "in the truck", and "no". I'm still working on "stand" so they'll stay still when I'm putting their saddles and packs on. They respond to their names, also.

    Lots of treats and repetition.........and a squirt gun for when they're acting up. I also don't expect them to be spot on the way my kelpie is as far as obedience. Their version of "come" is to amble toward me with some stops here and there to nibble the greenery. They are really good with "no" because it's backed up with a squirt gun or thrown pine cone or something (contact = correction. chasing them off = fun game).
     
  7. HunterTed

    HunterTed Rockin B Farm

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    One of my 1/2 Nubian 1/2 Boer nannies is great on a leash. I got her when she was 4 years old. One day I decided to put a dog collar on her and see how she would respond to it. She lead so wonderful just by grabbing her by the horn I thought it might work. Well it did. She leads better than most of the hunting dogs that I have ever had. She will also load up in the back of a pickup like a dog. Never tought her any of it and neither did the person who had her before me. She is EXTREMELY smart. I never would have imagined that a goat would be that smart. She just had a baby a couple of weeks ago and he is already starting to lead just like his mamma. He is going to be a present for my 4 year old cousin as soon as I wean him.
     
  8. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    Okay, this is exactly the thing I came in search for over here!

    DD and I volunteer at a local park that is actually an old homestead. We feed the animals one morning a week. There are three Saaneen doelings on loan, but they've got the worst manners!!! They jump on me every time I go into the field to feed them. Do I just pop them in the chest like I've done my dogs? They're really out of control, I need to know goat phsycology! (I like my sheep, they don't jump on me and I can milk them, too!)
     
  9. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    use the squirt gun first....or a twitch...and use the command "no" at the same time. I clap my hands for my girls to come in and yell "giddy up". I use names at milking time for whose turn is next....and I almost always milk in the same order.
    I try to always have treats in my pocket...raisins...so that they learn a positive connection and I have something to offer if I need to get them to listen. Sometimes I just put my hand in my pocket and they will come running.
     
  10. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    Popping them on the nose works better for me than getting them in the chest. Goats just balance too well on their hind legs to unbalance easily. Ears are another sensitive spot for a goat.

    Mine get popped when they try to butt me in play (when they're babies and learning), and when they bite. Licks and nibbles are fine (and kinda cute), sucking my finger in and chomping down is not!
     
  11. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    Thanks! The squirt gun will probably make dd feel a bit more secure. These girls are pretty small right now, but I think the rest of the park staff let's the get away with it, and they'll be quite a problem if it goes unchecked!
     
  12. furrflys

    furrflys Member

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    I have an old pet pygmy doe, a buck who is now deceased, and a 35lb bronze turkey hen who i would regularly take into the fields for fresh browse and exercise, along with a german sheperd and a greyhound all off leash. goats and turkey stayed closer and payed better attention than the dogs, even getting worried and calling out if i got out of site. that had to be a site to see! the pygmy doe is now teaching a new boer buck how to behave on family outtings lol.
     
  13. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    yup, all my nubians are trained, they come up to be milked, and when done, get cookies, if they don't get thier treat, they don't do nothing, and don't get down., yup, they are trained really well. hahahaaaaaaaa
    they just do what they want to do is all.
    it is a trip.
     
  14. EasyDay

    EasyDay Gimme a YAAAAY!

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    Sometimes I can't help but wonder who is really training whom? ;)
     
  15. GoldenWood Farm

    GoldenWood Farm Legally blonde! Supporter

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    When mine jump on me I grab them and flip them on their back and then hold them there intill they stop wiggling. When I do that I tell them no. It only takes a few times and they get it. Works like a charm to. It doesn't harm them in anyway. Just be gentle when you flip them. I am very carefull. (by the way these are like 2-3 month old kids..not full grown adults :no: :haha: . Can't imagine trying to do that to a full grown goat!

    All my milking does know their name and when I whistle will come running. Also my buck loves to take walks with me(without a halter or lead..he will just follow me like a dog)

    Also one of my does when I cluck knows to start moving faster(she can be a SLOW POKE!)

    MotherClucker :haha:
     
  16. manygoatsnmore

    manygoatsnmore Well-Known Member Supporter

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    DD13 has trained our LaMancha doe to pull a cart, and is raising her doe's LaMancha/Alpine wether (it was an OOPS mating :eek: ) to be a pack/pull utility goat. It's part of her 4-H project this year. I bought her a proper harness and shafts/singletree for Christmas and her BD this year, and we're working on a proper cart to replace the makeshift setup she's been using. The goal is to have the LaMancha pull a cart in the parade for our community fair this year, if the cart is done in time.